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  • Broken freezer liner

    Audrey got a new Whirlpool stainless steel Kitchen Aid fridge. (Whew) It alredy has a small crack in the freezer liner. Im pissed. It was 1800 dollars plus. It was a 6 month no intrest deal from leons furniture warehouse. They build **** nowadays. I should of braked up some 22 gauge and covered the old two door fridge i dumped but was working pwerfect (thirty years plus old though but nice two door heavy unit). I wish to repair the crack any suggestions. Thanx

  • #2
    Why not have them fix it under warranty? Surely it has one. It's probably as crappy as the fridge, though.

    The warranty on the Whirlpool water heater is a joke. It says on the box and on the tank the parts warranty is for nine years , but in the fine print it says they'll only replace a part once during the nine years. That means I'll have to pay for the next "Energy Smart" circuit board. The original one lasted one month.

    Good luck.
    Roger
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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    • #3
      If the liner crack is in a wall ( vertical surface ) the repair need only be cosmetic. Air passing through will not be detrimental to freezer operation.
      If the crack is in the freezer floor it must be made watertite. Liquids due to defrosting must not get into insulation.
      If possible order a new piece and replace the cracked one.
      If the liner cracked due to physical abuse sometimes a similar type plastic may be used as a welding filler rod for a working repair.
      If it cracked due to its internal stresses I doubt it may be repaired succesfully.
      Jim

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      • #4
        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Jim Hubbell:
        If the liner crack is in a wall ( vertical surface ) the repair need only be cosmetic. Air passing through will not be detrimental to freezer operation.
        .
        </font>
        Any cracks in the liner will let cold air circulate into and condense outside moisture in the liner area.... you don't want that... new liner is best, but a real pain. Some flexible adhesive might fix it also....as in RTV in and over the crack.

        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #5
          If it is new and cracked, get it repaired or replaced under warranty.

          If it is out of warranty, the liner is probably high impact polystyrene, and can be glued or sealed with airplane glue or Duco household cement. It won't be pretty, but will seal it. RTV may peel off unless the surface is roughened.

          It should be sealed.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            I'll stand by my post. The insulation will actually stay dryer if there is cold air allowed to circulate. The vapor barrier is always on the warm side of the insulation. The cold air is dry.
            Jim

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            • #7
              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Jim Hubbell:
              I'll stand by my post. The insulation will actually stay dryer if there is cold air allowed to circulate. The vapor barrier is always on the warm side of the insulation. The cold air is dry.</font>

              True, but it will condense water on the outside of the barrier, INSIDE the "wrap". That leads to drips on the floor from somewhere on the bottom, as well as potential rusting of the "wrap".

              Sealing the crack is so simple to do, why not do it?
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #8
                Jim RTV is that just plain silicone. I had the fridge one and a half months. Im not impressed yet i bought it with no money down no intrest 6 months deal. Maybe i just wont pay. Ill see my lawyer,

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                • #9
                  I'm still standing pat. It makes no difference if it is sealed or not as the inner liner is engineered to " breath ". The repair need only be cosmetic.
                  I am a little puzzled as to how water can condense on a warm surface. If the insulation is bad there will be condensing on the warm side ( of the warm air ). As I said the cold air is dry.
                  The above applies to houses as well as freezers.
                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    Tell them you think it's a lemon and ya want a different model.
                    Living By the Square and On the Level

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                    • #11
                      If you do repair it, an option is to use goop, or shoo-goo. It's tougher than the silicons, and it sticks really well. It will stink for awhile though, but so does silicon rubber.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        This is what been sealing my freezer for the last 8 years. Cheap and quick. You should be able to purchase from a local home center.
                        http://www.shurtape.com/Default.aspx...16&ProductID=2
                        John

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                        • #13
                          I like that tape. Its shiny.

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                          • #14
                            I don't remember the trade name, but I've also bought stainless steel tape a couple of times. It's really good. Sticks permanently. And since it's marketed to the HVAC crowd, I'd think it'd work well in a freezer/refrig. I think I got it a HD or Lowes. Just stumbled across it the first roll I got.
                            It has a protective paper film on the sticky side that you remove before applying.

                            Of course a replacement would be best.
                            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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