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  • Cool site

    This guy post over in the PM site, under the antique machine section, I was reading this thread and thought you guys might be interested, they do some beatiful work. http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ub...;f=11;t=001210

    This is their website http://www.coolweldstudios.com/index.htm

    This is a micrometer they make, look at the rope knurl, that is sweet. I wouldn't really want one of these mic's for the shop but it sure is nice looking.


    P.S. I am in no way affiliated with them or anything like that. And sorry if someone already posted it, but I couldn't remember seeing it and the search function on this website sucks.

  • #2
    Purdy.

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    • #3
      Pretty indeed!

      Ok, how do they (or more to the point, how do I) do that rope knurling?

      Ian
      All of the gear, no idea...

      Comment


      • #4
        You buy a Millgrain rope knurler.

        Here
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Mr. Frank Ford has a bit of a page about it here:

          http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Mach...ropeknurl.html

          -Justin

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          • #6
            I wondered if a concave knurling tool would do it - but I thought the edges might not come out looking nice. Seems they do!

            Thanks for the info guys.

            Ian
            All of the gear, no idea...

            Comment


            • #7
              That sure is a pretty tool.Much too nice to use.It's even got one of my old brass doorknobs on the end .A work of art.

              ------------------
              Hans
              Hans

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              • #8
                The anvil and spindle do not line up.

                They took a decent micrometer, drilled some holes in the frame and stuck some brass do-dads on it for coffee table art. As a mic, it is useless.
                Jim H.

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                • #9
                  It's for measuring offsets and eccentrics
                  All of the gear, no idea...

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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by JCHannum:
                    The anvil and spindle do not line up.

                    They took a decent micrometer, drilled some holes in the frame and stuck some brass do-dads on it for coffee table art. As a mic, it is useless.
                    </font>
                    you are right, as far as looks go, the ornamentation had me fooled. lots of old prints of tools and engines were embellished but the holes like "rc car-ish"

                    I've got some mic's supposedly turn of the century (not the last one) and they are very plain
                    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">The anvil and spindle do not line up.
                      They took a decent micrometer, drilled some holes in the frame and stuck some brass do-dads on it for coffee table art. As a mic, it is useless.</font>
                      JCHannum, you have based this claim on what? Have you checked these against calibrated standards? Or is it just your opinion by looking at a photo that they are useless?

                      I would really like to know how you can proclaim these as useless.

                      Les

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                      • #12
                        You could bury it out in the yard for about a year, dig it up, some steel wool, and get lot's of money for it on E-bay.

                        I like the idea of trying to create something that looks antique. But the entire thing should be made from scratch not just a $5 dollar mike fancied up. The rest of their stuff looks nice though. A bit to shiny however.

                        ------------------
                        Gene
                        Gene

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                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by L Webb:
                          JCHannum, you have based this claim on what? Have you checked these against calibrated standards? Or is it just your opinion by looking at a photo that they are useless?

                          I would really like to know how you can proclaim these as useless.

                          Les
                          </font>
                          A good micrometer that has had holes drilled in the frame, and whose anvil and spindle are out of line is nice decoration. The frame is more than likely sprung, making it useless as a micrometer. I would like to see someone calibrate it.

                          Here are a couple of old French micrometers that would be typical. I don't know age, perhaps someone can provide that information, but probably 100+ years old.



                          Jim H.

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                          • #14
                            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by topct:
                            You could bury it out in the yard for about a year, dig it up, some steel wool, and get lot's of money for it on E-bay.
                            </font>
                            a new business model for the ebay guy everyone loves so much

                            I agree with the fun of making an reproduction that looks authentic - thats the enjoyment of model engineering imo, but at second glance imo this is overdone. the pics jc posted look more like the antique mic's i have and have seen

                            [This message has been edited by Mcgyver (edited 08-08-2005).]
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • #15
                              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">A good micrometer that has had holes drilled in the frame, and whose anvil and spindle are out of line is nice decoration. The frame is more than likely sprung, making it useless as a micrometer. I would like to see someone calibrate it.</font>
                              JCHannum, you didn't answer my simple question. You have said these are useless as a mic. How did you come to that conclusion?
                              Did you test them or just conclude it by the picture?

                              Les

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