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  • #46
    3p h, if I thought it was cool,like a kid would , you would think is sucked,whatever.

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    • #47
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by yo:
      JCHannum & weirdscience,you got to be kidding me. Are you completely stupid? YES!!! Let the group see your creations. What do your mikes look like? Got the guts? NO!! Those French pieces of garbage were imported by companies like E.G.Smith.They were low ball crap back then at less than $3.00ea. Spanner holes - do you even know what these are? HAVE YOU EVER seen these in the same view of a Sterrett mike? NO!!! That's because they are located at about 4 O'clock on the barrel blind to the viewer in the image. You think your really blowing smoke up every bodies but here vand believe your own bull crap!! Having negative big mouths here just show your envy and how dumb you really are. We ordered 10ea. count 'em 10 IN FRONT OF US. recieved them and they are STUNNING!!!!! They check in SPINDLE TO ANVIL alignment, parrallelism, accuracy to Starrett AND Sherr-Tumico mike test sets @ 72*F. NOW are you going to dog those test sets? So if you can't make these or have them - they are no good. If you don't have anything constructive to say - keep your dumb but mouths closed and do us ALL a favor!!!</font>
      Premodonna panty wieght!I'm sorry,well actually your sorry.The picture cleary shows a mic with a misaligned spindle,there is no excuse for this on a "Made in the USA" product.I have two beater Chiwan mics at work,both are over ten years old and have seen rough use,both cost less than $10 each,tell me this why do the're anvils line up and yours don't?If they do as you claim,then what happened with the one pictured?Defect?Is it so f--king hard to wring the anvil and spindle face together,maintain alignment with a $2 drill bushing and zero the timble while the epoxy cures?Oh,BTW,the people at Starret and Mito use the epoxy because it's cheap,not because it's better.Drill a sloppy hole and glue it in,it's the American corprate crap factory way!

      So,what do we have here? A historically accurate replica?A functional tool for daily use?See it's kind of a bastard child because it's neither.A historic replica wouldn't have carbide faces and a fucntional tool for daily use would not have a swiss cheeze frame until it got larger than a 3-4" mic.

      The next question I have is,WTF would I want to build a Mic? Starret has been doing it for how long?They sell for how much?Hardly worth the effort.

      I can also tell you that if I made a level the vial posts would BOTH be in the center.That was not the fault of the camera,one or the other was off center by a soild 1/32",what happened,epoxy slumped in the heat?And did the original have grind marks left in the finish?

      I really enjoyed all the "decorative elements"and other such BS banter,to answer the question why do all hand tools have to be boring?Because they are not made to be looked at,they are made to be used.

      So you have a anvil and spindle made by someone else(because you don't know how)that has admittedly some nice rope knurls glued on to and into a frame full of holes for how many times the cost of a factory mic?It's nice to look at,but the calibration sticker will deminish the "asthetics" real quick if you decide to run work through it that will pass a good QC program.Which brings us back to "if you need a ride into town,will you drive the car or the hood ornament"?

      I really enjoyed all the childish BS in your post,really puts you into perspective,gives us insight to your character.Me I can dish out much better than I get,but not on this forum,I DO have respect for it's membership and owners.
      You made short sighted comments about JC and I AND YET YOU KNOW VERY LITTLE OR NOTHING ABOUT US.Sure we haven't made our own mics(as I said before that would be pointless)but we certainly could.I for one am too busy making a livivng AS a machinist to have the time to waste re-inventing the wheel.

      If Koolaid studios gets the anvils aligned,ditches the holes in the frame,adds a tenth scale and reduces the "lead fishing wieght" proportions of the (as I said twice before)nicely done knurling I will be satisfied,but still won't buy one as I have plenty of Christmas oranments now.As for the level,Captin Nemo wants his paper wieght back.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #48
        Oh,and uh I do post pictures of my work,it's not much,didn't take long to make,but it preforms it's intended function and cost way less than a comparable commercially made unit,no hood ornaments,so you obviously won't like it.


        Notice the lack of glaring grind marks and miss aligned parts?



        Oh and if you want to be a critic,feel free,unlike some I can take it.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

        Comment


        • #49
          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by wierdscience:
          Oh,and uh I do post pictures of my work,it's not much,didn't take long to make,but it preforms it's intended function and cost way less than a comparable commercially made unit,no hood ornaments,so you obviously won't like it.


          Notice the lack of glaring grind marks and miss aligned parts?



          Oh and if you want to be a critic,feel free,unlike some I can take it.
          </font>
          I like it, what is the dimension of the base?
          I may have to make one of those, but I am defiantely adding rope knurls and maybe some rhinestones to mine.

          Comment


          • #50
            Ohooo, weird LOVES rhinestones. Maybe he should hang some of those fuzzy dingleberry balls on it too. It’ll be cool, really.
            Location: North Central Texas

            Comment


            • #51
              I had chosen to let this thread die, as it had all the earmarks of becoming another "Dead Cat" thread, and we don't need anymore of those right now.

              Since yo has chosen to enter the fray with his valued opinion, I will respond.

              First, I must complement yo on his eloquent endorsement of the Coolweld Studios products. I am sure Coolweld will immediately incorporate it into their literature to show the high caliber and discerning taste of their customers. Good job.

              Second, as far as CWS's response to criticism about the misalignment of the micrometer, he never makes a statement that the micrometer does line up, or has an accuracy that a number can be assigned to, lines of parallelism for instance. He states he has seen Starrett mics new in the box that are mis-aligned, and mumbles about his camera after someone suggests it might be a poor photo. One must assume that is mis-aligned.

              Rather than defend the product, CWS goes into attack mode against his critics, and shows his appreciation of other manufacturers tools by calling Bridge City Tools "an ugly tool with lots of wood in it." Anyone familiar with Bridge City Tools knows this is far from true. They are beautifully made tools, capable of the job and representative of tools produced for their purpose.

              On the PM site, he has posted a photo of a mic made for Frank Ford, and Frank has posted a photo upon receipt. It is different in some details, and is in alignment. I hope he changes the photos on his website to reflect this, as apparently he has previously had this problem when the products are shown to people with machining knowledge. He refers to the RCM site as being critical too. Apparently knowledgeable people object to the presentation.

              There have been several references to the micrometer as stunning, men's jewelry, it would look cool on a desk etc. If this is what it was made to do, it is fine. Then it is a matter of taste, not accuracy or function.

              I never made a negative comment about the quality of work, and was complimentary of the work they do. It is very nice. The products are not for me however.

              As for me, I buy and sell precision tools, machine tooling and tools for a living. I can pretty well tell if a micrometer or other simple tool is good or not rather quickly, and if it is obviously bad by a photo. Kind of like a car with four flat tires.

              I recently sold a lot of 12 new Mitutoyo micrometers, and have at least that many more new and used 1" mics from a variety of manufacturers of all quality around right now, and none of them are mis-aligned. If they were, they would go into the scrap bucket for project mics. BTW, none of the project mics I have now are mis-aligned.

              Regular visitors to this site know that I frequently post photos of my projects with all their warts and pimples. I am not a professional machinist, but one need not be a concert pianist to recognise a clinker when someone hits one.

              In the past year, I have posted photos of two engines I have built, a partially completed Bill Harris steam roller and pics of tools and tooling I have made as well as my small, manual shop. I have also contributed two articles to HSM and MW. So, yes, I do show my work.


              Jim H.

              Comment


              • #52
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Joel:
                Ohooo, weird LOVES rhinestones. Maybe he should hang some of those fuzzy dingleberry balls on it too. It’ll be cool, really. </font>
                LT.Joel I was figuring on maybe some spinner hub caps,a turbo kit and maybe some neon lights under the bottom,15 or 20 colors in the paint scheme,and graphics,got to have graphics!Oooohhh and I got to have a spoiler!


                NOT!



                I just need one more tool,just one!

                Comment


                • #53
                  As far as the misalinement thing.....

                  Of course its BS, in terms of being a real indicator of function.... but;

                  "if they don't even care enough to aline the anvil on a piece they use in advertising, what DO they care about, and what else is wrong with it also?"

                  Now then, I assume these are NOT INTENDED to be "functional" pieces, as has been suggested, but rather decorative or "presentation" pieces. In that case, they are a bit better, although using a "real" thinble assembly should mean it would be usable.

                  I agree, I do NOT care for the combination of "aerospace" lightening holes with "retro" rope knurling.

                  My message to "coolweld"

                  "Folks, I would suggest from a design standpoint that you choose either retro or new, and stick to that theme, and not mix it up with elements from other eras, because I don't think (and I have company) that they go together well in the ones we have seen".


                  He also ain't making friends with the backhanded slam (on teh PM board) at home shop people, including, by reference, Barry Jordan, and Sherline contest winners, etc...... Many of them do work than makes that mic look kind of crude..... and he makes a point of mentioning his years of experience etc, etc. Work speaks, people squeak.

                  I might repeat that the coolweld pieces are evidently intended to be examples of "fine craftsmanship".

                  Now, "fine craftsmanship" includes getting ALL the details exactly right.... including alinements such as the anvil. When accomplished, it speaks for itself, whether the maker has 60 years or 60 minutes of experience.

                  Otherwise it is merely "good acceptable commercial work", which many others can do just as well (I may not be included, but I know it when I see it).

                  I still sorta like the pieces for what they are... although I would NOT characterize them as really being reproductions or whatever the term he used was, of old stuff. They are much more "interpretations", if you will. Nice, no doubt.

                  [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 08-21-2005).]
                  CNC machines only go through the motions.

                  Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                  Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                  Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                  I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                  Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by JCHannum:
                    A good micrometer that has had holes drilled in the frame, and whose anvil and spindle are out of line is nice decoration. The frame is more than likely sprung, making it useless as a micrometer. I would like to see someone calibrate it.

                    Here are a couple of old French micrometers that would be typical. I don't know age, perhaps someone can provide that information, but probably 100+ years old.


                    </font>

                    I had one that my grandfather had when he worked for Stewart Warner before WWI. It was a B&S I believe(somebody lifted it) and it looked much like ours do today. Your's look much older. They have that 'one off' look. Before 1890 maybe?

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      .

                      [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 08-21-2005).]
                      CNC machines only go through the motions.

                      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Jerry; I read your post on the PM site, and I very much meant to make the point that lack of attention to detail indicates poor quality work. In my third post, I said, "The apparent offset in the anvil and spindle if nothing more displays inattention to detail that I would not expect to find in a precision instrument costing this much."

                        I was surprised at the reaction of many on the PM site. Several of these "professionals" seem to be happy with something that looks good.

                        Thanks for sticking up for the HSM. Very nicely put. Ability has nothing to do with the cost of the tools used.

                        Rustybolt; the two micrometers were both made in France. The smaller is marked France, and the larger "Aux Forges De Vulcain, Paris".

                        They are both metric, and may be late 1800's. I have no idea of the age. Brown & Sharpe saw a French micrometer at the Paris Exposition of 1867, and brought the idea to the US, they and L.S. Starrett refined it. There has been little change in construction since 1900.
                        Jim H.

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                        • #57
                          JC,the comment our"friend" made about those mics being "lowbuck" is proof positive of his ignorance.He makes note of them costing "less than $3.00 each(BACK THEN)"

                          I hope he realizes,back then $3.00 was half a weeks wages for a machinist and a new lathe could be bought for less than $100.

                          If he had done his research he would have found that ornamentaion on machinery and tools was pretty much out by the late 1850's and was all but gone after the Civil War.

                          Those are neat mics you have there and worth more to me(and you too I am sure)for the're simple witness to times past and the hands that held them.
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            JC you got me thinking about the history. I'd read once the Maudsley (SP?) invented the tenths mic around 1800, but the first mic was invented in the Baroque area, by William Gascoigne an Englishman in 1636.

                            Seems like B&S and Starrett were rather late comers to the party.

                            http://www.worldwideschool.org/libra...II/chap43.html
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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