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Anybody ever build there tools using Gingery's books?

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  • Anybody ever build there tools using Gingery's books?

    Hello All,
    I am a Machining student at belmont tech college in St. Clairsville Ohio. And, a couple of years ago my mom bought me David Gingerys books "Build Your Own Metal Working Shop from Scrap" Series. And, now I would like to build them. Since I am a machining student. Has anyone ever done this? Where could I get supplies for the characol foundry? Also, when I am done, where can I find some plans for steam engines? I am into those and hit and miss engines. Also, would these engines be possible with this equipment? Please help me.
    Thanks,
    Jeeper

    ------------------
    Duct Tape, the most widely used tool!!
    Whenever you hear BOOM in a machine shop, always ask, \"Finish Cut?\"

  • #2
    Jeeper
    There's a yahoo group for Gingery builders http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gingery_machines/
    Good Luck!

    Herb

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    • #3
      Thanks alot Herb for the info.
      Chris

      ------------------
      Duct Tape, the most widely used tool!!
      Whenever you hear BOOM in a machine shop, always ask, \"Finish Cut?\"

      Comment


      • #4
        Live Steam, also published by the sponsor of this board is a good start for IC stuff. Check the ads for leads. I bet if you ask Neil nice he'll send you a free copy.

        [This message has been edited by Gizmo (edited 10-01-2002).]

        Comment


        • #5
          I have read about his books in a catalog I get, but am not so impressed. Take his bandsaw for instance if you have a junyard full of scrap metal and odds and end parts it might be worthwhile. But if you plan to buy iron for the project, as well as a motor and cord and springs, sheet metal, coolant pump, and whatever else it requires, you will find that you have over half the cost of buying a cheap new one. And unless you have other good equipment to make it with you can't be sure of the accuracy.
          I learned this one the hard way. I thought I would make myself a milling machine with a new drillpress and a milling table. With the cost of these put together I was only about $150 short of buying a small brand new one. But I would still be lacking a quill stop, quill lock, table locks, knee adjustment and knee locks. ( very important) A lot of work yet to do. Is it worth my time for a measly $150? I don't think so!!! I think you are better off to request catalogs from Enco or Grizzly or Victor Machinery exchange or other machine tool suppliers. And pinch your pennies until you get a good machine.
          When you build something out of angle and flat iron you will find that you are lacking one very important element of a good machine. CAST IRON. Why is cast iron so important? Because it absorbs vibration, something you don't want. Why do you think machine tool companies spend so much time and efort using cast iron?

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Gizmo and David. David, I have never thought of that. I have thought of the accuarcy and that, but not the money(go figure). Do you have websites on those machines that you suggested? And, what sizes should I look at for the lathe mill and drill press. I am trying to stay away from those multiy machine deals. I heard some bad stuff about them. I have already subscribed to this magizine. Oh, and can you recommend a good first project once I get my machines? Something simple and easy, till I get to know these machines. Sorry about all the questions, I just want to get started out on the right foot. All, and is anybody else out here being trained to be a machinist or is a machinist?
            Thanks,
            Chris

            ------------------
            Duct Tape, the most widely used tool!!
            Whenever you hear BOOM in a machine shop, always ask, \"Finish Cut?\"

            Comment


            • #7
              Check out www.backyardmetalcasting.com This guy is working on a Gingery lathe, and has ideas for inexpensive furnaces. Interesting page even if you don't end up building machines

              Comment


              • #8
                Why not wait until you can afford brand new cnc machines? If you are lucky you might get to use them for a day before you croak.

                Built my first lathe out of angle iron .... still remember my early projects. Can't remember what I turned last month with the fancy lathes I now use.

                Still use the bandsaw my grandfather built out of a plow and cream separator.

                You learn this machine trade one chip at a time. Drooling over a tool catalog does not give you the needed hands-on experience

                Comment


                • #9
                  I gotta agree with Trap.The experience of building something from scrap for as little as you can get away with is the challenge.The resulting accuracy will be the time and patience you put into it.Its all about learning.Go for it Jeeper. Hell even if you fail you'll have learned a hell of a lot more than someone who just plunked down money for the equipment.
                  Addendum; You gotta learn to dumpster dive. Check out the dumpsters in your local industrial park.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Have read the Gingery books and they are great reading. Have started 2 of the projects but I keep getting distracted with other "fun" shop troubles.

                    Pyramid Products, in Niland CA, sells foundry stuff and are good to deal with. I bought lots of stuff from them.

                    The object of the Gingery books, to me, is not that the machines will compete with the Bridgeports and the like but that you have fun building them yourself at little cost and then have a capable machine when you are done. Most of the time you could buy a used machine for comparable expense that would be bigger, faster, better and more practical. But if I wanted to be practical I probable wouldn't have a shop at all! Thanks--Mike.

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                    • #11
                      I'm with Mike, Rusty & Trap. Making the stuff you work with is half the fun. After all,if you just want to work with high end machines you can go & get a job somewhere.
                      Tel

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                      • #12
                        Interesting question regarding the Gingery machine tool series.

                        Here's a little food for thought: in the October/November 2002 issue of Machinist's Workshop there is an article titled "Metal Lathe Cone Center." It should be of interest to you for two reasons: 1) the author casts the cone in aluminum which you would be doing while building the machines, and 2) it sure looks to me like he's using a Gingery (or Gingery-derived) lathe to do the turning.

                        Proof that you can build and do meaningful work with Gingery machine tools.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks guys for the replies. Ya, I want to experience and something to play around with. I know that I wouldnt get too too accurate work, but it mite save me money. But, I was thinking, what should I cast it out of? Aluminum or iron? But, like what David said. If I dump money into these machines and just have to go an extra 150 dollars for a new machine that I know will be more accurate(hopefully), why wouldnt I do that? Just a thought, i dont know.
                          Thanks,
                          Chris

                          ------------------
                          Duct Tape, the most widely used tool!!
                          Whenever you hear BOOM in a machine shop, always ask, \"Finish Cut?\"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            David
                            despite your most excellent first name - I have to take issue with your statement.

                            When faced with no other alternatives there is nothing wrong with Gingery's stuff. It can be made on the cheap if you try hard enough. If a precision lathe can be made by P.O.W.'s under the watchful eyes of the Japanese noses with crude tools then anything can be done if you have the will and determination. I would also argue that the accuracy from a cheap import may be no better than these home built units. This is determined entirely on the builder's skills, proper use of materials, and attention to detail and not as much on its cost.

                            Solving a problem and doing it with pride in your workmanship is something you cannot a dollar figure on...

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                            • #15
                              There's no reason for your home built machine to be any less accurate than any of the middle range stuff around. Beauty of it is you can keep working on it with modifications & improvements, something you would be less inclined to do with a fancy store-bought machine.
                              Tel

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