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  • About Bridgeport vs. Rung Foo

    I have a Rung Foo. I'd like to get a used Bridgeport but some guys tell they're are largely made for wimps. Wanting to get into some really manly projects do you think I'd be better off with the Rung Fooo?

    [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 10-28-2005).]
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  • #2
    I don't know how manly of projects you are talking about, but I have done some pretty big stuff on a Bridgeport, you just have to be creative. Bigger mills have an advantage when you are taking bigger cuts or working on large heavy iems, but a Bridgeport sure is a nice easy to use machine, the handles are all within easy arm reach and it takes up a rather small foot print compared to a larger mill.

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    • #3
      Another point, a twenty year old bp is still easy to sell where as a twenty year old chicom one is junk after about five years because you have so much trouble getting parts.
      my two cents worth.
      Herm Williams

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      • #4
        "...some guys tell they're are largely made for wimps." Just goes to show how much credence real men should give to foolish observations.

        A turret mill (Bridgeport is only a brand name) is a real man's machine tool and so is most any other. Every machine has unavoidable limitations built into it by the designer as he strives to balance desirable features that often conflict with price and market placement.

        A turret mill will not machine 20,000 lb workpieces but for work within its range and design intent it's a highly optimised machine tool that's hard to beat in terms of bang for the buck. Only detail changes have been made since its inception 70 years ago attesting to the superiority of the origina concept.

        If you need a milling machine having a greater table weight capacity or a larger work envelope than a turret mill, the "manly" thing to do is to work up a list of features and shop for the machine that best meets your requirements.

        Oh, and get a different set of "some guys" to hang with. The ones you have seem to be clouding your perceptions.

        [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 10-29-2005).]

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        • #5
          "bridgeport" mills come in different sizes... i've worked on some that seem half the size compared to others.. we have a fairly big one at work.. 4hp... huge when compared to a 2hp bridgeport.. but still the same design.

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          • #6
            A b-port is definately a step up from a mill drill,but like others have siad they do have the're limitations.
            They can do many tricks a mill drill can't or aleast without going to a great deal of extra work to accoplish it.Beeing about to rotate and tilt the head on a compound angle does come in handy.
            Then there is the factor of raw wieght,1800+lbs of cast is always a plus.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #7
              I've bored holes in a 3000 lb block with a bridgeport.We have a crane scale,and I will set the block on the table with the scale reading 200 lbs less than when fully lifted.Clamp down the block and bore away.

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              • #8
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by lathehand:
                I've bored holes in a 3000 lb block with a bridgeport.</font>
                How big (dimensions) of a block of what material? Was the block on the table of the mill? I cannot picture a workpiece of the 3,000# on the table of a Bridgeport.

                The Bridgeport manual states a maximun workpiece weight of 750#.

                I could see a piece a bit heavier than the maximum weight, but not 4 X the maximum weight without the failure of something somewhere.

                This is by no means saying you did not do as you said.
                Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

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                • #9
                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by lathehand:
                  I will set the block on the table with the scale reading 200 lbs less than when fully lifted.Clamp down the block and bore away. </font>
                  The weight of the workpiece is only 200 lbs as far as the mill is concerned.
                  Location: North Central Texas

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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Joel:
                    The weight of the workpiece is only 200 lbs as far as the mill is concerned.</font>
                    Yup, thats it.The block was something like 35 x 30 x 11, so the chains from the edges of the block cleared the head and were left in place when machining.
                    I would have flipped the machine if I would have set it down fully on the table.

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                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by lathehand:
                      scale reading 200 lbs less than when fully lifted.</font>
                      Perhaps I should have read more carefully.
                      Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

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