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My Rear End (pictures)

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  • My Rear End (pictures)

    I used my HF shop crain for the first time today and I'm thrilled with it. I test-fitted the engine to the frame and will start building the engine mount and finish up the rear end soon:







    -Adrian

    [This message has been edited by 3 Phase Lightbulb (edited 11-05-2005).]

  • #2
    Nice work! Wher'd you get the metal
    Techno-Anarchist

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    • #3
      Looking good! You may not need the 5 foot flames out the back to turn some heads!
      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

      It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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      • #4
        Looks good.

        hoffman... looks like black threaded pipe.. Lowes or Home Depot I'm guessing.
        Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

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        • #5
          I bought 100' of SCH40 1" ID, .190" wall structual pipe from Home Depot after it was clear that Industrial Metal Sales wasn't on the ball. The mild steel pipe TIG welds beautifully after you remove the black scale.

          It's the same steel pipe I built my PsychoKart with.

          -Adrian

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          • #6
            Hey Tink, I think Hoffman's comment has to do with other posts.

            Looks good to me Adrian. But I sure hope the seat sits further from the exhaust. It could do more than expose your rear end.

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            • #7
              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
              Hey Tink, I think Hoffman's comment has to do with other posts.

              Looks good to me Adrian. But I sure hope the seat sits further from the exhaust. It could do more than expose your rear end.
              </font>
              The seat is actually touching the Oil cooler right now. I'll relocate the Oil cooler later. The 4 exhaust ports are another inch or so below the oil cooler. If I leave the seat where it is right now, then it will be about 2" away from the exhaust header so maybe it might get a little warm. I can probably move the seat up another foot if I have to. Nothing is finalized yet as I'm just starting the mock up of everything now. I need to build an engine mount, and add a lot more structure to the rear.

              -Adrian

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              • #8
                Here is a picture from the rear:



                I still need to build the upper frame members. Right now there is no strength without the upper frame members. The upper frame members will tie everything in and also bolt right up to the top of the two differential flange bearings. My rear suspension is going to pivot from the Upper/Lower frame members that are attached to the flange bearings. It should look really cool when I get a rolling chasis.

                -Adrian

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                • #9
                  Adrian, nice work as usual,one question I have and I'm sure you've thought about it too is,do you think the airflow will be sufficient for proper cooling?
                  Another thing I noticed that has me concerned about your safety is that 100lb propane tank in your shop.There is a very real possibilty of the tank venting off excess pressure if brought in cold and full into a warm shop.I'm sure your house insurance would be void if there was a fire or explosion,that is of course if your still around to file a claim.Please stay safe,I enjoy your posts and want see the project to completion.
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've had the experience of a 1 lb tank of propane venting, and it was quite exciting but not in a generally good way. I'm lucky that I wasn't fooling with fire at the time, and it was outside. A lot of gas was released, and the tank froze. I doubt the vent valve closed either, since gas continued to vent for some time, though much slower.
                    All it would take is for low-lying propane to reach a gas water heater or other pilot flame. Kaboom! You'd be lucky to HAVE a rear end.

                    Other than that, good luck with your project.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Willy:
                      Adrian, nice work as usual,one question I have and I'm sure you've thought about it too is,do you think the airflow will be sufficient for proper cooling?
                      Another thing I noticed that has me concerned about your safety is that 100lb propane tank in your shop.There is a very real possibilty of the tank venting off excess pressure if brought in cold and full into a warm shop.I'm sure your house insurance would be void if there was a fire or explosion,that is of course if your still around to file a claim.Please stay safe,I enjoy your posts and want see the project to completion.
                      </font>
                      I think the air flow probably won't be sufficient but I'm not going to worry about it too much right now. I'm not really building this buggy to go out and ride around in for long periods of time. If I have to stop riding after 5 minutes to let it cool off, that's ok for now. If I end up wanting to spend more time playing with it, I'll probably go with a much stronger water cooled fuel injected engine anyway. The engine I'm using right now is an '83 GSX 750cc with around 80hp. The engine I really want to use is a '04 GSXR 1000cc (180 hp) which is a lot lighter, is water cooled, fuel injected, computer controlled, etc.

                      The propane bottle valve is never opened unless I'm actually heating my shop. It's ok if it vents some propane to adjust for pressure. The only concern I have with my propane bottle is a rupture. Hopefully my Oxy/Acty rig that is right next to the propane bottle doesn't blow up and rupture the propane.

                      -Adrian

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                      • #12
                        Adrian,the valve doesn't have to be open for it to release excess presure,also if you brought the tank in cold and full and then turned on the heat there is a very real possibilty that the propane would expand enough to vent out of the safty valve.Not a pretty picture if you happen to be welding or grinding.It's also illegal in most jurisdictions for those very reasons.
                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Willy:
                          Adrian,the valve doesn't have to be open for it to release excess presure,also if you brought the tank in cold and full and then turned on the heat there is a very real possibilty that the propane would expand enough to vent out of the safty valve.Not a pretty picture if you happen to be welding or grinding.It's also illegal in most jurisdictions for those very reasons.</font>
                          If I hold an open flame 3 feet away from my propane bottle and the over-fill pressure release valve opens, I expect nothing to happen. On TV, there would definitely be a big explosion, but not in my shop

                          -Adrian

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                          • #14
                            Propane is heavier than air (unlike natural gas) and will remain at a low level in an enclosed space. That is until it sees a spark...
                            Location: North Central Texas

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                            • #15
                              Adrian -
                              Ditto here: nice, nice work, and of course, stay safe.

                              I've got to say, though - is that the seat you'll be using? I'm going to guess that cloth upholstry isn't going to fare so well in the dirt and mud. It appears to be pretty fancy otherwise, but I'm going to guess that the psycho-buggy type application is one where vinyl seats are still appropriate.

                              So, when do you think you'll start doing wheelies?

                              -M
                              The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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