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  • Gage versus Gauge

    The thread about using a dial bore prompted me to ask something that I have wondered about for a while.

    What is the difference between a gauge and a gage (spelled without a 'U')?

    <pastes>
    Definitions of Gage - 1). Gauge is the spelling used in Great Britain but finds some use in the US It is chiefly found for nonlinear measurement instruments (fluid gages, etc.). However, it is finding increased use for coordinate measuring machines where it designates a device with a proportional range and some form of indicator.
    2). an instrument or device for measuring, indicating or comparing a physical characteristic.
    3). gauge: a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc
    Definitions of Gauge - 1). a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc.
    2).# accepted or approved instance or example of a quantity or quality against which others are judged or measured or compared
    # determine the capacity, volume, or contents of by measurement and calculation; "gauge the wine barrels"
    3). # measure precisely and against a standard; "the wire is gauged"
    # adapt to a specified measurement; "gauge the instruments"
    # the thickness of wire
    4). In engineering, a gauge is used to make measurements. Various types of gauges include: * Bore gauge* Feeler gauge* Fishtail-Center gauge* Go-NoGo gauge* Gauge blocks* Radius gauge* Thread pitch* Vernier height gauge.

    FWIW, it seems that I have noticed gauge used more in conjection with a device that has moving parts, and gage seems to be used more with devices that *don't* have moving parts, i.e., jo-blocks, ring or plug thread gages, etc. But I'd like to learn the proper usage from people much more knowledgable with the terminology.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Most people know what you are talking about either way.
    Like pOtAtO or potato(pronounced potahto).

    IMHO

    ------------------
    The tame Wolf !

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    • #3
      Interesting, the Machinery's Handbook(twentieth edition) uses "gage".

      I don't have any idea why I use gauge. I do have a Union Tool Co. thread gauge however. Maybe it's because it has moving parts ie, the leafs.

      ------------------
      Gene
      Gene

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      • #4
        Thread gauge.
        Small hole gage.
        Some things seem to get one or the other.
        Nil illigitimi carborundum

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        • #5
          I think it is like the word
          tire or as they say across the pond tyre.

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          • #6
            Gage is also used as a persons name.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #7
              Guage is the correct spelling.

              Gage has an entirely different meaning i.e.
              a token of defiance, had you had to endure my 6th grade english teacher you would know this.
              Non, je ne regrette rien.

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              • #8
                Guagenestinklestenerismflemistinkopoopaw.

                A noun.
                Gene

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                • #9
                  The way I learned it: "guage" is a verb and "gage" is the noun: "Hand me that gage so I can guage the thread" Over my lifetime usage has been converging on "gage" as acceptable for both.

                  It's hair splitting for any but purists and people like me who love words.

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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">
                    Guage is the correct spelling. </font>
                    So now I have a third word to contend with - guage versus gauge versus gage??

                    Thanks for the replies - I guess it's a distinction without a difference.

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                    • #11
                      If you want another, how about "Align" vs "Aline"....

                      Another one of those that has textbooks on both sides of the issue.....

                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

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                      • #12
                        I don't believe it's application-specific, but rather user-specific. The Merriam-Webster Second Unabridged has the good sense to agree with me. By user-specific I mean that some people use "gage" on all occasions, some use "gauge". The great practical advantage to spelling it "gage" is that you will never accidently type it "guage", which is not a word in English.

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                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by chief:
                          Guage is the correct spelling.

                          </font>
                          Only if you are dyslectic

                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                          • #14
                            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by chief:
                            Guage is the correct spelling.
                            </font>
                            I don't think so

                            Gage is a form of plum

                            Tim


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                            • #15
                              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by IOWOLF:
                              Most people know what you are talking about either way.
                              Like pOtAtO or potato(pronounced potahto).MHO
                              </font>
                              And if you run them together at 45 or 60 degree intervals you have a Harley.

                              Ken

                              Ken.

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