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  • Drilling brass?

    These are carb jets, drilled from 0.6mm to 2.2mm.
    The jobber-drills hang up, and I haven't seen anything in the standard catalogues about drills for brass in these sizes.
    Is there a style or make of drills for brass in these small sizes?
    Thanks,
    Ron LaDow

  • #2
    Just take the bit you want to use and grind the tip almost flat, that should do the trick.
    James Kilroy

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    • #3
      stone or grind zero rake onto the drill, same as you would when cutting in the lathe. if you are new to it, it may not be obviously where the rake on a drill is...here's a photo showing the positive rake ground down to zero rake

      http://metalworking.com/DropBox/brass1.jpg
      .

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      • #4
        Well, grinding the tip flat might work, but it seems it would increase the effective rake. I can try it.
        And no offense, I'm familiar with drill rake, but I'm really not competent to modify the rake on drills in that range. The one I was using today is 1.4mm, say 56 thou; that's a flute ~20 thou wide.
        I haven't called the folks who sharpen my cutters; maybe that's the way to go.
        Thanks,
        Ron LaDow

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        • #5
          In those sizes you might try carbide circut board drills spun up in a Dremel or pencil grinder.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            Orifice reamers will do the trick. get them from welding suppliers.
            Jim, By the river enjoying life...

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            • #7
              Just use a stone and an eye loupe.Sometimes all it takes is a broken edge. Allen

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              • #8
                Grinding the tip flat is just changing the relief, look at Mcgyvers photo and stone that edge for a more neutral rake. James

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                • #9
                  I'll check on most all, but holy cow! Some folks have really good peeps.
                  I can read the paper without specs, but I'll have to try some magnification to mod those flukes. I don't think I have a stone that will get in there.
                  Thanks,
                  Ron LaDow

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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Ron LaDow:
                    And no offense, I'm familiar with drill rake, but I'm really not competent to modify the rake on drills in that range. </font>
                    none taken or intended, thats a small drill.

                    what works for me is some small hard arkansas slips, ony a couple of inches long and maybe 3/16 thick, they usually have a sharp enough corner to get in the small drils, with the right stone is a few seconds work, but i agree without those little stones i'd be stumped! oh yeah, not my photo, just mined it (in case the legit owner is about to descend and bust me )
                    .

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                    • #11
                      Try using an end mill. 2 flute of course. You will very close hole size and it will not tend to pull like a drill.

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                      • #12
                        I've always done like Mcgyver, a few strokes with a stone is usually all it takes to break the sharp cutting edge.
                        Smitty.... Ride Hard, Die Fast

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                        • #13
                          Clock makers grind all brass drills to zero rake. Been doin it for centuries.
                          Only way to get a hole in brass that is half way decent.finish with a reamer.
                          Bobby.
                          boef

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                          • #14
                            I use my Dremel to touchup drills to zero rake. I use the side of a 1" abrasive disk. You can square the edge a bit by touching it to another stone lightly. A 0.6mm will be a challenge but possible working under magnification. Light touch.

                            I have a visor for such work.

                            Paul A.
                            Paul A.

                            Make it fit.
                            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                            • #15
                              Paul,
                              Great minds or fools....
                              I was just about to report the edge of a Dremel cut-off tool drops right in on the leading edge of a flute on that 1.4mm drill.
                              I put the drill in the tail-stock chuck to keep it steady and rested my hands on the ways. Just a touch; you can see (with my magnifying 'peeps'; probably the same as your visor) the rake go flat.
                              Just drilled one; perfect!
                              Thanks, folks,
                              Ron LaDow

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