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  • OT - ? 4 British members

    While watching a movie in which the word "sir" was used many times, a question came to mind.
    Here in the US we use the word "sir" to politely address a man whose name we do not know.
    Since the British use the word "sir" as an honorific, what how do you politely address a stranger?

  • #2
    Oi you! ger orf moi land.

    Comment


    • #3
      'sir' (or'madam').

      Generally when you want their money

      Tim

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      • #4
        It is a convention to use Dear Sir or Madam in correspondence when we don't know the person to whom (not who) we address. Note the Royal Wee. Sorry- we.
        Again, if we are really standing as formally as we dare, one( note the third person singular) says Sir or madam.
        One can terminate with:-
        I have the honour to be
        Sir
        Your Obedient Servant

        This is especially useful when you both know that you really mean- Hey, you, Sunshine or you bag of ****e.

        Sir, is again used to denote rank. the commonest- and they usually are- knights- who have probably been Siring- or baronets which are little barons are all addressed as Sir-who the f*** are you. Dames are not the organisers of brothels- sorry- usually the orgaisers of brothels and places of ill repute but respected members of the opposite sex who have gained honour in the field- of the arts, politics or the like. Do you like politics- like?

        Kings- when we get any- will be addressed not as " Hey, you, Big Ears" but "Sire" and from all reports, Elizabeth Alexandra Mary's laddo has done a bit- I mean- a bit of that.

        I trust that this has proved to open up some of most interesting bits in polite English protocol.
        Clearly, one- note the order- has to proceed with the utmost caution in HM Forces. One uses the word "Sir" to anyone with a Royal Warrant down or up to the rank of Warrant Officer- and with assorted scrambled egg on his hat. Here recognition becomes difficult with sexual freedom when one can wear a crown not on the head but on the shoulder and rings- not on fingers or on lower parts of the anatomy but on one's sleeves. One has thin rings, middle size rings and broad rings and they should be switched off in aircraft, places of entertainment and worship- but worn in warships.
        No doubt that you will be getting the feeling for all of this and whilst it is frowned upon by the Vatican is readily accepted by the Church of England.You know the thing- another fellow feeling?

        I now rest my case.

        Norman

        Comment


        • #5
          It is a convention to use Dear Sir or Madam in correspondence when we don't know the person to whom (not who) we address. Note the Royal Wee. Sorry- we.
          Again, if we are really standing as formally as we dare, one( note the third person singular) says Sir or madam.
          One can terminate with:-
          I have the honour to be
          Sir
          Your Obedient Servant

          This is especially useful when you both know that you really mean- Hey, you, Sunshine or you bag of ****e.

          Sir, is again used to denote rank. the commonest- and they usually are- knights- who have probably been Siring- or baronets which are little barons are all addressed as Sir-who the f*** are you. Dames are not the organisers of brothels- sorry- usually the organisers of brothels and places of ill repute but respected members of the opposite sex who have gained honour in the field- of the arts, politics or the like. Do you like politics- like?

          Kings- when we get any- will be addressed not as " Hey, you, Big Ears" but "Sire" and from all reports, Elizabeth Alexandra Mary's laddo has done a bit- I mean- a bit of that.

          I trust that this has proved to open up some of most interesting bits in polite English protocol.
          Clearly, one- note the order- has to proceed with the utmost caution in HM Forces. One uses the word "Sir" to anyone with a Royal Warrant down or up to the rank of Warrant Officer- and with assorted scrambled egg on his hat. Here recognition becomes difficult with sexual freedom when one can wear a crown not on the head but on the shoulder and rings- not on fingers or on lower parts of the anatomy but on one's sleeves. One has thin rings, middle size rings and broad rings and they should be switched off in aircraft, places of entertainment and worship- but worn in warships.
          No doubt that you will be getting the feeling for all of this and whilst it is frowned upon by the Vatican is readily accepted by the Church of England.You know the thing- another fellow feeling?

          I now rest my case.

          Norman

          Comment


          • #6
            It was hard trying to understand N.A the first time. It was doubly hard the second, does anyone apart from me not understand what he says or is it just my lack of intellect

            [This message has been edited by malbenbut (edited 11-30-2005).]

            Comment


            • #7
              M!
              I think tht you will appreciate that the correct explanation written in the cold light of day would probably be just as incomprehensible to someone who has separated by a common language.

              I was poking- there used to be a law against it- fun- and there is not a lot about- English- now there's a joke- language.

              Over to you,kind sir, over.

              NA

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              • #8
                Ah the evils of strong drink.OOOOOOOPs sorry Norm Alistair
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                Comment


                • #9
                  And a Happy St Andrews Night to you- and all me wavers of that great Saltire.

                  Hic! Hic!

                  And Alistair

                  I meant it.
                  Now for a rousing " Ball of Kirriemuir"

                  Norm



                  [This message has been edited by NORMAN ATKINSON (edited 11-30-2005).]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The term Sir in the UK is a generic form of respect.
                    It applies to people you wish to address politely, as in "Excuse me Sir"

                    When applied to a honorific it's usually prefixed before that persons name as in "Sir John"

                    Unless you are aquainted with the honorific then it's hard to know they are titled so the generic Sir will surfice.

                    Sr John, [ Earl of Sudspumpwater ]
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by malbenbut:
                      It was hard trying to understand N.A the first time. It was doubly hard the second, does anyone apart from me not understand what he says

                      </font>
                      No I think it's an excess of bromide in the tea or having to wwear short trousers into his 30's.

                      Sir John.

                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It was hard trying to understand N.A the first time. It was doubly hard the second, does anyone apart from me not understand what he says


                        Anyone used to doing cryptic crosswords would have no bother understanding him....... Me.........I dont do crosswords.
                        All the bbest.mark

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In the service we of ocurse had to address officers as sir or by their rank but the convention wisdom was that if you addressed an offcier as sir, you were implying that he didn't know who is real father was.
                          Non, je ne regrette rien.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If it speaks to you say Sir as you salute.
                            If it doesnt speak but moves salute it.
                            If it doesnt move pick it up and take it away.
                            If it is too heavy to pick up, then paint it white.
                            These are a soldiers rules.Especially for recruit.
                            bobby.
                            PS Of course if you are trying to sell a chap a ten year old car then you always call him Sir. B.
                            boef

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sir John,
                              Re this bromide thing!

                              " malbenbut" is an anagram of a 'a numb belt' Just exercising me little brain!

                              Yes, Mark, after 55 years, they are almost admitting the funny things that we did.

                              Matron calling- back to the coffee.
                              Tastes funny?

                              Norm

                              [This message has been edited by NORMAN ATKINSON (edited 11-30-2005).]

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