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preventing rust before paint?

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  • #16
    Simple answer. The part won't rust while it is wet, it needs oxygen and water. Keep the part wet as you clean it and as a last step rinse it with boiling water. Boiling water is deoxygenated. This will warm the part enough that no moisture will condense, even at the microscopic level. The part will quickly dry because of the retained heat but will still be warm enough to prevent rust from condensation for a short while, plenty of time to give it a shot of primer.
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    • #17
      For short term protection I've used a liquid phosphoric acid product...I can't remember the brand name at the moment. I would try a liquid product or something like this:

      http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/m...gory_Code=RCAC

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      • #18
        You problem is the surface of the metal is somehow charged with rust promoting cooties by the rust removaal process. If you are treating the metal with an acid pickle you have to passivate it imeediately after. As it happens a hot solution of powdered laundry detergent with its high percentage of sodium carbonate scrubbed into the metal surface with a stiff brush works eliminates these rust promoting cooties (residual acid ions) as anythng you could get from a commercial metal treatment supply house.

        For the last ten years I've been following up the hot degergent dip with a phosphoric acid metal prep solution like Jasco Metal Prep. This etches the metal a trifle, provides a rust resistant surface, and improves the paint grip. In an unheated shop, resistance to rust improves from mere seconds when fresh from the pickle to days after the passivation, to months with the metal prep.

        All this is worked out by the paint, metal cleaning, and prep industry for generations. You can find some excellent advice if you Google under metal prep, rust prevention, and similar search objects.

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        • #19
          I use three drums.One for the electrolisis,one for a plain water rinse and the final is filled with Surprep 5 rust converter cut 10:1 with water.I just rinse the parts then dunk in the Surprep solution.Once it dries the parts will keep indoors indefinately.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #20
            Darin beat me to it!

            I skip the dips and put a 1/4 cup of phosforic acid in the electrolysis tank (5gal). I use the cheap Jebco, Jesco or something like that "metal prep" available at Home Depot, et al.

            Don't over do it or your amps will skyrocket.

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            • #21
              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by NORMAN ATKINSON:
              Only one person survived the storm and was captured and tried and duly hung as a French spy.
              Later, it was discovered that the survivor was none other than the ship's pet monkey.

              See what you lot missed!

              Norm
              </font>
              That was no monkey, that was my grandpappy's grandpa's second cousin!

              He just looked, talked, and smelled like a monkey.... reckon that's because he stayed behind when we left

              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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              • #22
                Lead loading?

                My query is addressed mainly at you experts in, near or with connections with North East England:
                I am told that the only solution to rust forming on / in my Cavalier rear wheel arches is to go for "lead loading", but that this may not be economic in view of the value of the car. Does anyone know anyone who does this in the North East? I am not a metal expert myself!

                Thanks

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                • #23
                  Dunno, but I noticed the original poster seems to be from Louisiana.

                  That in and of itself is rust-creating.

                  Dry does not rust at least not fast. Humidity rusts.

                  I try to dry off parts right away, towel and hot air.

                  Humid areas will rust the metal and not a durn thing you can do but move.

                  UK is wet too, right?
                  CNC machines only go through the motions.

                  Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                  Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                  Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                  I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                  Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                  • #24
                    I fully understand your problem. It is related to where you live Clinton LA. Hot and Humid . Have same problem here Sport La but not as bad. Only solution is gray primer I buy it buy the 6 pack at wal mart. Face it metal rust down here.
                    Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                    http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                    http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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