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What Kind of Paint on a Copper Boiler

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  • What Kind of Paint on a Copper Boiler

    My 2 inch scale Minneapolis Boiler is coming along nicely, and I am now considering Paint. I love the Hammerite spray products, but they tell me they are no good over 200 degrees. Any suggestion for brands of spray paint would be great.



    ------------------
    Wade
    Wade

  • #2
    Shouldn't it be some kind of wood lagging, or other insulation covering?

    If not, I'd guess one of the high-temp "barbeque grill" paints would do it. Or there may be something for high-temp exhaust paint at an auto parts place.


    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
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    Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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    • #3
      No, a traction engine boiler (american) rarely has lagging because there are so many things attached to it.
      Wade

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      • #4
        If your boiler will be in the 350-400 F. range an Epoxy Appliance paint will work best unless the boiler will have a lot of sun exposure which will cause the epoxy paint to chalk. If it will be in sunlight a lot and the temp around 300 F. then a urethane would be a better choice. I do not believe that a high temp paint will stick to copper for long without chemical surface treatment before application of the paint. Hope that helps. Nilsson

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        • #5
          Wade, there is some type of coating that racers are using on exhaust headers. I was told that it won't crack, peel or change color. The headers that I saw, may have only had twenty minutes running time on them. Not long enough for my approval. I don't remember a name or how it is applied but I think it is some type of ceramic. If no one else (hint-hint car nuts) knows what I am talking about, I'll try to get the info and post it.

          jim

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          • #6
            Jim is right, you could get a Plasma sprayed ceramic coating if you wish, but I do not think it would be appropriate or allowed on a ticketed boiler. There are many high temperature paints that are suitable and should not affect boiler certification.

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            • #7
              Thrud, if it is just a coating, why would it be disallowed? Because they can? Or could this stuff flake or cause work hardening of the boiler material.

              jim

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              • #8
                In another recent thread "Pyrometer" there was a reference to another website (Kilns/books/supplies/etc.) One of the supplies was a group of very high temperature coatings: ITC -- I assumed that was the brandname. Performance characteristics they cited were very impressive, as was the price (about $27 - $49.00). Might be worth investigating.

                here's that website:
                http://pottery-books.com/cgi-local/a...yrometers.html

                [This message has been edited by lynnl (edited 11-15-2002).]

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                • #9
                  jim:
                  Because it is a hard coating with no give. It also obstructs visual inspection of the pressure vessel - hiding defects such as cracks, etc.. You would need to confirm its use with the certfying agency in yur area.

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                  • #10
                    Thrud, understand the lack of inspection ability.

                    How thick is the plasma sprayed ceramic coating that you mentioned and isn’t it made for a high thermal expansion? What I remember seeing was on a drag car exhaust header. I would think that in that position it would be put to the test with heat and expansion. Would a boiler be any thinner then a header?

                    Maybe we are talking about two different products. I'll try to get a brand name and maybe a MSDS for it.

                    jim

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                    • #11
                      Here is a link for the "Live Steam" forum - must be lots of model engineers who can help.

                      http://www.chaski.com/cgi-bin/webbbs...steam.pl?#4333

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                      • #12
                        jim:
                        Copper and steel do not expand at the same rate, ceramics and steel have nearly identical expansion rate - the reason ceramic gage blocks are becoming so popular (corrosion/storage issues are the other big ones). Because their thermal expansion rates are nerly identical the seramic rarely cracks on steel. Copper or the coating itself could fail. It may be useable at lower temps, but I am not sure if the inspectors would allow it. They are very fussy as to what can or cannot be done to them. I am not saying it cannot be done, I am saying you had better check with the certifing agency first - that is all.

                        That being said and done, I think this ceramic coating kicks ass. I have a friend that had his Triumph Triple crotch rocket all done in a "chrome ceramic" coating - looks beautiful and it never turns the headers blue like regular chrome. He said it cost $50 to get his headers done in Calgary, AB.

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                        • #13
                          Wade,

                          To find out more about the ceramic coatings go to http://www.jet-hot.com. They do the coating on headers and other parts.

                          Joe

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