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One of them nights...

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  • One of them nights...

    Have you ever had one of them nights when everything seems to go wrong? Last night was one of them for me. I was working on a part in the lathe. On the final finish cut on a hub of the part, I apparently bumped the compound dial when adjusting the cross feed dial for the finish cut. The part ended up .040" undersize, because of a careless mistake. I built it back up with some weld, and started over. About ten pm last night, I finally got the part to come out the right size. Turning the weld beads was a first time thing for me, and that proved to be a challenge for my little SB 9A. During this same time, I was working on a picture frame for a friend of mine. All was going well, until the molder head on the table saw decided to take my stock and chew it up into an unrecognizable mess. So, I glued up another set of boards to replace that one. Maybe tonight, I can get some work done, instead of fixing up my screw-ups!
    Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

  • #2
    lately i have had this problem in the shop of going out there and sitting down in front of the corn stove and just watching corn drop into the fire.

    after half an hour i say the hell with it and go back upstairs to work on the computer.

    AT LEAST YOU WERE WORKING!

    -Jacob

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    • #3
      One year for Christmas the kids got me a reloading press. The same year I was suffering from Epstein-Barr Virus. No strength, endurance or concentration. Decided I could not trust myself to repeatedly and accurately throw powder charges & etc. I put the thing away until I got better and could give my full attention.

      Same way with machining; sometimes it is better to shut down and rest up. Do it once, rather than quick and twice.

      Wes
      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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      • #4
        The key is to run through the process several times in your head first... You can still work in your shop without physically being there

        -Adrian

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        • #5
          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by snowman:
          lately i have had this problem in the shop of going out there and sitting down in front of the corn stove and just watching corn drop into the fire.

          after half an hour i say the hell with it and go back upstairs to work on the computer.

          AT LEAST YOU WERE WORKING!

          -Jacob
          </font>
          Jakob...that's strange...I went through the same thing awhile ago. I had so much to do that it sort of overwhelmed me I guess.
          Got better after I put a dent in it all
          Russ (and yes...arbo...I know "that night" also)

          I have tools I don't even know I own...

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          • #6
            tomorrow is the day.

            i plan to ship out everything that has been purchased from me.

            after everything is shipped, i can start enjoying the shop, at my own pace...once again. i've got a laundry list of things to do, i am looking forward to it.

            -Jacob

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            • #7
              "The key is to run through the process several times in your head first... You can still work in your shop without physically being there
              -Adrian"

              ditto! Got to have something to do while in class!

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              • #8
                I find when things are slow and boring at the day job, I have less ambition during evenings and on weekends. When things are busy at work, it seems like I feel like doing more in the home shop. Of course the two activities are very different.
                Lynn S.

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                • #9
                  That's happened to me lots of times. Maybe one day I'll learn. Most often the handle on the dial will turn downwards because I didn't engage the friction ring. Usually the slide backs away and the work is left larger than expected. Sometimes my shirt or something catches the handle and I don't feel it, even though I have it in mind that it could happen. Then I take a short expletive break and go back to it. I often forget just where the dial was even if I have just set it moments ago. AAK!
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    My problem in a nutshell....

                    http://comics.com/wash/pickles/archi...-20051215.html

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                    • #11
                      smoked the rpc just now.

                      does that qualify?

                      loose wire hidden away out sight,on capacitor bank- flash, hummmmmmmmmmm.

                      motor hot ,no smoke .

                      dont know if the thing is toast.

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                      • #12
                        yup

                        that's all i have to say today

                        yup

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                        • #13
                          of course just when itappears that i am are in a deep hole ,
                          then out i pop , the RPC still works and the guy at the electrical store
                          was kind enough to give me a couple of fuses-after 5.00- come pay tomorrow,everything working.hahahahahaha


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                          • #14
                            Must not have let the magis smoke out.
                            At a certain point in the course of any project, it comes time to shoot the engineers and build the damn thing.

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                            • #15
                              Arbo, I definatley know how you feel. If i remember correctly (rarely the older I get) you also collect the old visible gas pumps as i do. I has just finished a 5 gal Frye. Completely disassembled, sandblasted, primed, painted, decaled, but with the original glass and globe. Moved the finished pump (10' high) over to the shop door (9' high) and proceeded to open the overhead door with great vigor. Then there was this terrible noise behind me, turned around, my gas pump is on the floor, broken glass everywhere. Now that's not all, I had just bought a new roll around Kennedy box and had left 3 drawers open, yep you guessed it, the pump took the open tool box drawers with it. The scene was depressing at best. I closed the door, turned out the lights and went to the house.

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