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Collet Chuck on SB9A??

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  • Collet Chuck on SB9A??

    I have a job coming up that will require two quick operations on alot of parts. Most likely in the hundreds. Right now, I am using only a four jaw chuck, and I don't really want to use a three jaw for this job, even if I had one. So, here is my idea...

    Mate this...
    http://www.littlemachineshop.com/pro...ProductID=1792

    To this...
    http://www.littlemachineshop.com/pro...ProductID=2532

    Seems to me that it should work. Does anyone have experience here? I am going to call LMS later, to see if there is any reason that it absolutely will not work. I am leaning towards the ER collets instead of 5C. I have heard that the ER have a greater range of travel in each respective size, over the 5C.

    By the way, I don't have time to build my own collet chuck right now.

    Thanks!
    Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

  • #2
    Look down the list here,

    http://www.bealltool.com/colletchk.htm

    Either one would probably work. I like LMS products. But the one from Beall looks good too.

    Uh Oh, I just realized, the Beall screws directly on to the spindle. Quick and easy. BUT whose to say how true it would run. I'm thinking it would be good on a wood lathe, but since you can't index it to your spindle, I question it's accuracy.

    The LMS can be trued since you will have to turn that mounting plate on your lathe.

    ------------------
    Gene

    [This message has been edited by topct (edited 12-15-2005).]
    Gene

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    • #3
      I've been considering the same type set-up on my 9A. Here is another option:
      http://www.shop.tallgrasstools.com/d...g?productId=15
      I did find a write-up earlier on the Beall chuck installed on a Taig lathe. The author seemed happy and reported a runout of 0.0005. I would be interested to know what you end up with and how satisfied you are with the end product.
      Found the review:
      http://www.cartertools.com/beall.html

      [This message has been edited by johnc (edited 12-15-2005).]

      Comment


      • #4
        There is quite a lot of variation in the register diameter and threads on SB9 lathes - so if you need the kind of accuracy that one normally expects from a collet setup, you probably have to bore the register diameter of the chuck to fit your lathe. I'd recommend you contact the manufacturer of any chuck you plan to buy and verify that the register bore is enough undersize that you can machine it to fit.

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        • #5
          Arbo, what is the beginning diameter of the workpiece and what is the finished diamter?

          Comment


          • #6
            Al,

            The OD is .500", and stays that way. The three ops involve in making the part are simply...center drill, drill, ream. Finished, and next part.
            Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

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            • #7
              I can tell you how to make a simple jig to use in the 4 jaw that won't take 30 minutes to make and for all practical purposes will be as accurate as a collet, and save you a bundle of money if you wish.

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              • #8
                Al,

                Let's hear it. If it works, and saves money, I'm all for it!
                Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

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                • #9
                  You will probably loose some rigidity with this as compared to using a 5C, if you have a large spindle.
                  Life is a compromise.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have one that accepts B&S 22 collets and can be opened and closed while running. Collets can be changed without dismounting it.

                    I think it was imported by Grand Tool in New Jersey.

                    Another nice feature is that it can be opened with the left hand while removing or replacing parts with the right hand.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Arbo,

                      Here's just one more option to add to the mix.

                      Make a new backplate for your existing 3-jaw that is adjustable like the set-true chucks. I made one for my chuck and it's no big deal.

                      Since you are just using one size of material the set-true feature should have repeatable results.

                      Oops...just reread the post - you don't have a three jaw - sorry.

                      [This message has been edited by Mike Burdick (edited 12-16-2005).]

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                      • #12
                        Arbo,

                        Since your workpiece is only .500" in diameter, chuck up a short piece of 1.00" round stock in the four jaw chuck as I understand that this is the only chuck you own? This will also work in a three jaw chuck. Center it as closely as you can and drill a 3/8" hole through the center. Punch a mark on it where it maked contact with two adjacent jaws. Remove from chuck and drill and tap a 1/4" hole about 1" from one end. Re-insert in the chuck, aligning the punch marks with their respective jaws. Then drill/ream/bore the hole until your .500" stock will slide in the hole with a "Stiff puch fit". Drop a bit of Lead in the threaded hole and install a FLAT POINT set screw. You can now do your machining on the workpiece and as long as the jig is not disturbed nor removed from the chuck, the center of the workpiece with co-incide with the centers of the lathe. When you have finished drilling one piece, slack off on the set screw, pull it out and push in another.

                        BTW: This method will also work on Square stock and is a lot quicker than trying to use a four jaw chuck to center it.

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                        • #13
                          I forgot to add that the threaded hole is across the radius of the jig, and make sure that when you put it back in the lathe for the final drilling/reaming/boring, that you leave it far enough out from the face of the chuck that you can get at it with a hex wrench.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If this is going to be a repeating job, I would definitely be looking for a small turret lathe, like a small Hardinge, with a handlever or air operated collet chuck. Been there and still doing that.
                            Harry

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                            • #15
                              Harry, a lot of us amateurs have to do with what we've got and cannot afford to run out and buy a Hardinge or any other turret lathe.

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