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Easy-Outs...rarely easy, seldom out....

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  • Easy-Outs...rarely easy, seldom out....

    After a frustrating experience this past weekend, I'm wondering:

    Have any of you EVER gotten an Easy-Out to work, on ANYTHING?

    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
    Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

  • #2
    Yes! but only once; bust it the next time!

    I think Heli-coil thread inserts were designed as a theropeautic resource for frustrated easy out users.

    RR

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    • #3
      Yea,
      Those easyouts and tap-removal tools with the little fingers work great (har!har!har!).
      kap

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      • #4
        Easy-Out, Liquid wrench, and WD40 are used world over by gullible folks thinking that it will somehow magically loosen that rusted bolt.

        If the fastener turns then by all means use some lubricant, but if it doesn't then this is what I do in order of failure.

        1. apply heat using propane torch
        2. use impact wrench
        3. drill it out using English drill bit
        4. Oversize drill and use Heli-coil
        5. scrap the whole thing, have a temporary mental break down and shed few cathartic tears.

        Albert

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        • #5
          Best idea for an easy-out----don't buy it and don't borrow one.
          Instead purchase a left hand drill bit just a bit smaller than the "tap drill" and drill out the broken fastener. 90% of the time as you are just getting started drilling it will catch and unscrew itself.
          Remember to run the drill in reverse and use quite a bit of pressure. When done I put the drill in a plastic bag with a note that identifies it as left hand.

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          • #6
            There's two kinds of easy-out type deal, only one is the brand name.

            The ones with a twist shank ALWAYS break, when they don't waller out the hole yo drilled. I think those are the easy-out brand.

            I have some others that are square, dunno the brand, maybe Vermont-American. They work about 70% of the time.

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            • #7
              SWG,

              Easy outs work all the time every time. I have several set of different designs. I have always been able to drill the required hole and insert the easy out in it. That part has never failed.
              I would not be without them. However if you would like to purchase them from me I will sell them at a good price. Note: several are broken in the packages but there is no discount because they can be used now to get more frustration on larger more difficult to remove bolts.

              Joe

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              • #8
                IMHO i follow

                1. (sometimes) apply heat using propane torch
                2. (sometimes) use impact wrench
                3. (90% of bell curve) drill it out using English drill bit
                4. (9%) Oversize drill and use Heli-coil or Keensert
                5. (do #5 when doing #3 & #4) have a temporary mental break down and shed few cathartic tears.

                Thanks for the borrow Al.

                WJHartson your quote says it all LOL "However if you would like to purchase them from me I will sell them at a good price" LOL sure LOL.

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                • #9
                  I did the penetrating oil (overnight), the heat from a torch, the hammering, the torque until I stripped out the socket of the setscrew I was trying to remove. I then drilled the setscrew enough to get things apart, and tried an Easy-Out in the hole to see if I could get out the remains of the setscrew. It didn't work...but I didn't really expect it would. I finally drilled tapping size and happily hit it dead center enough so I took out the setscrew but barely touched the tapped hole.

                  I think Easy-Outs, et al, exist just to give you something to do while you figure out what you're REALLY going to do to get the d*** thing apart.
                  ----------
                  Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                  Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                  Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                  There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                  Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                  Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    my expeirience with "EZ" out of any type parallels you all's. My firsst try is heat, oil, then - credit "precision engine" magazine for this. heat and touch the bolt with some beeswax. It usually lets the bolt back out easily.

                    And when its important, I use a soft copper tube, some valve grinding compound, drill press with a weight on the handle. Dam the compound with clay and let it spin. Proper size tube will grind a bolt or tap out. you have to check on it maybe every fiteen minutes and it will take an hour or so to remove a tap. Bolts cut slower. Time invested isn't much. Once the tube starts making its center stick up into the tube, it just a matter of letting it spin. BTW there are differences between compound makers. I prefer Clover brand.
                    Steve
                    PS you Can grind a tap or bolt and leave just the threads and pull thenm out like a spring. Doesnt happen often but it sure feels good when it does happen. usualy I need a small chisel to collapse the shell.

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                    • #11
                      If it don't fall out when you turn it upside down and shake it then an easy out won't shift it. - Period.
                      Bin there, dun that, got the T shirt - and been sick all down it.

                      John S.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I love easyouts! They bring me alot of business! Farmers like to use them after they drill a crooked hole and go through the side of the bolt. Then brake off the easyout and bring to our shop. what would have cost them about $10.00 to have me take it out. Now cost them about $42.00.
                        What we do is weld a nut on the broken bolt and turn it out. Sometimes you have to use a little heat to get things started. If that don't work drill a hole down into the broken bolt. Being careful not to go through the side! Fill it up with weld and weld a nut on it. and now screw it out. the weld shrinks the bolt.
                        Rob

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                        • #13
                          SGW:

                          Other than buying a nice set of 135* split point Norseman lefthanded twist drills - they often will remove a bolt when drilling them for an easyout - might I suggest a better moosetrap?

                          After breaking a Snap-off not-so-easy-out I purchased some really great little buggers made by Alden (1-800-83-ALDEN) Corp from Wolcott CT.

                          They are called Drill-out power extractors and they work very well. These go down to a #5 screw, and is used with a portable drill on low speed. They come in a nice blow molded case or you can buy individual units.

                          I give them an 7 out of 10 - they would score a ten if they were a lot cheaper! ($160 Canadian for the set of 7 extractors - I got mine for $90 because Acklands/Grainger screwed up and I refused to pay more than I was quoted).

                          [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 11-05-2002).]

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                          • #14
                            "...better moosetrap.." That one tickled my funny bone! Thanx for the laugh Thrud.

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                            • #15
                              Hi all!

                              I've used the power-out(s) and have had good results using them with a 3/8 electric drill. For a mechanic, they are the way to go even if expensive. I've used Easy outs on small bolts, 1/4 and down with fair results. It is very important to drill the hole for the easy-out in the center of the broken bolt. This is the trick and often is just about impossible to do. With motorcycle parts, I often use a centering microscope, ( a cheap one from MSC) and jig the part on the table of a Bridgeport. I know this doesn't help for most jobs where you're lying on the ground, reaching up into a dark recess in an automobile or truck, but the point is, if you can get the hole in the center, the things work. If you are lucky enough to have a steel bolt or tap broken off in brass or German silver, just use alum and dissolve the stinker out!
                              hms50
                              hms

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