Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

mechanical puzzle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • mechanical puzzle

    Recently ran across a 3/4" Almond drill chuck that was mounted on ball bearings. Part of tooling for an old 16" South Bend. Don't know the purpose, though, and I was hoping somebody else might.

    Some details. The housing consists of a piece of round hot-rolled steel 2.375" OD and 3" long. ID is bored to 1.875" for 2.5" of depth. One end open to 1.875", one end drilled and tapped 3/4"x16 tpi, with a shop-made Morse taper 3 arbor threaded into the tapped hole. Chuck is mounted on a 1.25" diameter arbor about 3.5" long. One ball bearing race at chuck's back, other race on the bottom end of the arbor. A plate has been fastened onto the aft end. Chuck, arbor and bearings are pressed into this housing.

    Chuck's in great shape and spins very freely on this mount. I'm open to ideas about why you'd want to do this, 'cause I haven't got any.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    I'd mount it in the tailstock as a rotating support for the part I was cutting.


    ------------------
    Mike L
    Amateur machinist, self-taught. I had a poor teacher, but I was a good student.
    Mike L
    Amateur machinist, self-taught. I had a poor teacher, but I was a good student.

    Comment


    • #3
      It might have come from an automotive repair shop where they used that type of chuck to recondition the armatures of generators and starters. They would chuck one end up in the headstock chuck and the other end in a rotating drill chuck in the tailstock.

      Hope this helps.

      Greg
      "The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is." Winston Churchill

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm guessing (up front) that I'm not seeing this quite right in my mind's eye, but I have something I call my poor man's milling machine. Mine runs in pillow blocks. The chuck is on its own shaft, and another shaft is #2MT with a draw bar. Rear of both shafts have flats, and I drive it with a 1/2" hole shooter. When bolted to compound it is dead on center line. I do all sorts of goofy stuff with it. If it will bolt to your compound or topslide it might be something along these lines.
        REread your post, and I think I'm wrong. But what the heck, you could use the parts and make the poorman mill anyway!
        I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a 3-1/2" Bison mounted on a MT#2 that does not rotate, but is used in the tailstock, roatry table, and milling head for various workholding and toolholding chores.

          What you have sound like a live chuck for turning armatures as has been suggested already, or it can be used to turn tubing and shafts.

          Bison makes a 3-1/2" to 6" chucks mounted on bearings for MT#2 to 6 shanks for turning tubing among other things.

          Comment


          • #6
            Another flyer this one.... how about that its a holder off of a tool & cutter grinder.

            I have a tailstock like fittng for my Clarkson grinder which tees into the table, the spindle is similar to a tailstock barrel but is ball bearing mounted. It carries a 3" Pratt chuck, into which I can load either cutters or cutter holders for re-grinds. Now if this had a fixed barrel it would have required the chuck to rotate on its mount (as s7hss's tool is described). Maybe the tool 'walked' from the T&C dept into the 16" SBL's direction!?

            Then again it is just a guess as seen from my perspective - I would vote for 3jaw's answer, sounds likely to have been an armature reconditioner..... Wonder where the commutator undercutting tool is????

            RR

            Comment


            • #7
              Many thanks to all for their input. After reading the replies, I did some more digging through the tooling. Did find commutator undercutting tools (thanks RR!), so that makes a lot of sense. It's taken some digging to get the tooling sorted out, as most of it hasn't been used for 20 years or more.

              During disassembly, I've been admiring the workmanship. Somebody obviously went to a lot of trouble to make the live mount and did a nice job, but my blacksmithing chapter wants the chuck for drilling in that same lathe. The housing and chuck arbor are hardened, so I may not be able to cross-drill for a locking pin.

              Many thanks to those who responded. The wisdom is very much appreciated. Learn something new every day.

              Tom

              Comment


              • #8
                Tom,

                If you can't cross drill and pin it ~ how about putting a lathe dog (with 90* bend leg) on it to catch against the tailstock body? I can even now envisage a set up that uses this as a tapping attachment!!!!

                Seems a shame to use this tool for drilling though! it may damage the jaws ~ for the price of a new chuck and arbor I'd want to keep it 'as is'.

                RR

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ragarsed,

                  The dog is an excellent idea. Don't have one that big, but should be able to make one up. The group I'm with (www.blacksmithing.org) operates as a non-profit organization, and as 3/4" chucks are somewhat expensive, this one will have to serve for drilling.

                  A tapping attachment...intriguing concept...hmmmm....

                  Tom

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X