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  • I'm so smart

    Apparently automotive taper (1.5" per foot) reamers aren't available in my small town (Los Angeles) so I grabbed a piece of O-1 and went to work.

    Zip off a piece, chuck it up, set the compound to taper 0.125 in an inch to get my 1 1/2" per foot taper (anyone see where this is going?). An hour later, my first homemade fluted reamer is taking a sauna in the toaster oven while I go back to the rest of the machining on this rush job.

    Around 10 PM, I pop it out of the oven, cool it off and stone the edges. Chuck it up and start reaming away. It cuts a little slow but is going along fine. I get about halfway in and decide it's time to check fit with the tie-rod end. Note to self: 0.125 per inch on the lathe doesn't an automotive reamer make.

    Anyone need a 3" per foot reamer

  • #2
    The old phrase "Half the Included Angle" comes to mind
    THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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    • #3
      if you can make our own reamers it seems there's a market for that sort of thing... http://www.speedwaymotors.com/xq/asp...qx/Product.htm

      [This message has been edited by yorgatron (edited 12-21-2005).]

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      • #4
        Man you are a uhhh... purist I just use an old ball joint that I milled flutes in and case hardened.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5

          If you don't ever make "DUH" type mistakes you are not doing anything.

          Wierd - Thats another good idea, wish I was that smart.

          Ross
          GUNS Don't kill people
          Drivers using cell phones do.

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          • #6
            This one rates with my making a complex part and having finished it I took it to the work bench for assembly and realized I had made a mirror copy instead. It doesn't end there.
            Tried it again and made part of the second part a mirror image. It was definitely a bad day.

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            • #7
              I needed to make an inside left hand acme thread on a part. My first try ended up right hand. I got it right the second time.

              Quickly, tell me how you would set that up on the lathe.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Evan,
                I'd set it up as if I wanted right hand threads...
                Thanks,
                Ron LaDow

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                • #9
                  David...I like weirds idea but your local Snap-On guy has 1 1/2" to the foot reamers.
                  There is a pricey one and an Econo one. Up here they sell for about $40 Cnd.
                  Russ
                  I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                  • #10
                    I had to send my steering arm to Canada for that taper!! I found it cheaper than buying the reamer! But the end result for my crossover steering was worth it! Scott

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                    • #11
                      Here's a pic of the nearly completed project, a forklift spindle with a rather broken tierod arm.

                      yorgatron,
                      Mine is a little more "utilitarian" than those. I'm no T&D guy, just a hack with some equipment. A lathe, a mill-drill and a grinder did good enough to ream through some mig weld buildup I had to add.

                      Wierd,
                      How do you take care of working with it, just weld a piece of round stock to the ball? Are you able to stone an adequate edge after case hardening?
                      Unfortunately, I have no spare Hyster tierod end laying around. This one's a little bigger than average. These guys managed to break the lever off of the spindle so the tierod end was still good, just kinda hanging in the breeze.

                      torker,
                      You only need one strike with most Snap-on guys. I've got two; I'm mobile and an HSMer.

                      ZMAN,
                      When cross-over using chevy tie rods on EBs became popular, aa-mfg sold a very reasonably priced reamer. I don't see it on their website now. Since this was a customer forklift, I couldn't wait on shipping to Canada, especially around the holidays.

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                      • #12
                        David I hear ya!! I was actually admitting I took the easy way out!! I admire you for the get it done attitude!!! plus I was a little nervous of high speed failures! not likely on a forklift!! lol Scott

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                        • #13
                          "Wierd,
                          How do you take care of working with it, just weld a piece of round stock to the ball? Are you able to stone an adequate edge after case hardening?
                          Unfortunately, I have no spare Hyster tierod end laying around. This one's a little bigger than average. These guys managed to break the lever off of the spindle so the tierod end was still good, just kinda hanging in the breeze."

                          Basically that's it,just weld a section of round stock to the ball,chuck the tierod ball by the threads,tap it around til it turns true,centerdrill the stock you welded on and turn the shank true.You can anneal the tapered section and mill the slots in,you only need 5 or 6,then just heat it red until it loses pull on a magnet and quench in water.Sometimes you get lucky and it's hard enough without the kasenite,but if not what to do next is grind some relief in the backs of the cutting edges and then case harden it.You can also weld a nut on the shank to turn it by or if you want mill a square tang on it.
                          In use I usually put the part in the lathe,put a center in the reamer shank,add tailstock pressure and turn the reamer with a wrench.
                          It's usually good for two or three shots before it needs sharpening.

                          For the occasional one off repair,I have also used an old ball as a forging tool.Just grill the hole out large enough for the taper to start in by about 1/3 the length,heat the socket up bright red,stick taper in and drive it home while the backside is supported by something substantial like a hole in a heavy section of plate.When the taper is driven down til your happy with it,let it cool just until black/blue then flip the part and knock out the taper otherwise it will get stuck.

                          [This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 12-22-2005).]
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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