Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Suggestions for Cuttin .070 Al Sheet

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Suggestions for Cuttin .070 Al Sheet

    I have some sheet aluminum that is .070 thick and is about 3' by 6' that I need to cut into various shapes, some is irregular.

    I do not have a sheer, so I was considering a simple Saber Saw with a metal blade, then follow with a file to hand work the cut edges straight and flat.

    Some pieces will be 6' long, so there will be a lot of edge work to do.

    Any better suggestions using basic tools?

    Thanks,

    Marv

    Post Script:

    It's politically incorrect, but MERRY CHRISTMAS and HAPPY NEW YEAR to all!!!


    [This message has been edited by debequem (edited 12-22-2005).]

  • #2
    Jigsaw with a metal cutting blade is what I'd use,I cut that thickness steel with mine.

    Allan

    Comment


    • #3
      No offence taken here. Merry Christmas to you and yours!

      Check out the cheap HF electric shear. I've been using it to shear .060 steel so it should cut your aluminum. You'll have to adjust the cutter gap a little but it should work. It's a darn nice shear for the price.

      http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=92148

      Comment


      • #4
        That's cool! I may have to pick one of those up after the holidays.

        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
        No offence taken here. Merry Christmas to you and yours!

        Check out the cheap HF electric shear. I've been using it to shear .060 steel so it should cut your aluminum. You'll have to adjust the cutter gap a little but it should work. It's a darn nice shear for the price.

        http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=92148
        </font>

        Comment


        • #5
          Marv,

          If you have one, a router works very nice on the thin aluminum! If you have many of the same shapes to cut out you can make a template out of masonite.

          Another handy hand tool that will cut this is a hand nibbler from Klien. I think Radio Shack had something like this too - not sure if they still do.





          [This message has been edited by Mike Burdick (edited 12-22-2005).]

          Comment


          • #6
            A hand nibbler on .070 ? Your hand will fall off.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              Yikes! Hand nibbler? That would kill me! I am trying to build a full-size cockpit section of an aircraft and I have a lot of aluminum to cut. They are neat tools, although.

              I had not considered a router.

              Marv

              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Mike Burdick:
              Marv,

              If you have one, a router works very nice on the thin aluminum! If you have many of the same shapes to cut out you can make a template out of masonite.

              Another handy hand tool that will cut this is a hand nibbler from Klien. I think Radio Shack had something like this too - not sure if they still do.



              [This message has been edited by Mike Burdick (edited 12-22-2005).]
              </font>

              Comment


              • #8
                An aircraft cockpit of .070 aluminum? What is it, a Warthog?
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                Comment


                • #9
                  Why not use your circular saw for all the long straight cuts and then the jig saw for all the fiddly cuts. Lots quicker using the circular saw with a tipped blade and it cuts like butter. Just watch out for the hot chips and wear ear protection as well, it makes the most god awfull noise when your using the circular saw.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hmm. Most smaller aircraft use .032 for skin with some .063 for re-enforcement and load carrying sections and stringers. Some use even thinner material down to .015. The Pilatus Porter uses .020" floor panels sandwiched with balsa wood between two skins.

                    You could make life a lot easier by using .032 material. That is cuttable with aviation snips.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      This is for a simulator, so it gets much rougher treatment than the real aircraft ever would. Also, it gets more hours of use, too.

                      that, and it never leaves the ground. ;-)

                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
                      Hmm. Most smaller aircraft use .032 for skin with some .063 for re-enforcement and load carrying sections and stringers. Some use even thinner material down to .015. The Pilatus Porter uses .020" floor panels sandwiched with balsa wood between two skins.

                      You could make life a lot easier by using .032 material. That is cuttable with aviation snips.
                      </font>

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Which aircraft?
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This one is for an F-16. Next one after that is JSF.

                          Not as romantic as some of the older aircraft such as the P-51, but it will help pay the rent.

                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
                          Which aircraft? </font>

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I second the use of a jigsaw with metal blade. It sure is nice to have the blade 'kick' feature, which the bosch has. I cut a fair amount of .125 thick al with it, and used al cutting fluid as well. Makes a nice job.

                            By the way, a belt sander will save you a lot of time with the file, as far as outside curves, anyway. Use an 80 or 120 grit belt, and not too much pressure.

                            [This message has been edited by darryl (edited 12-22-2005).]
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Marv,

                              Check this video.

                              http://www.compfused.com/directlink/1019/
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X