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  • Hammerite paint?

    Is this forum mess up?

  • #2
    Wouldn't know, Mike.

    The last miracle came out the East- and I missed it. Maybe, it is coming out of the West and I don't want to miss it this time.

    Meanwhile, eh?

    Norm

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    • #3
      Hammerite paint?

      I notice that some people like to use "hammerite" paint on their shop made tools and such.

      Is this some sort of high durability paint or something? Is it spray on, or brush on? Is it available through retail outlets like HD or Lowe's? Don't suppose it costs .99 a can like the flat-black spray paint I get from HD?

      What do you use to paint your shop made tools, fixtures, gadgets etc? Do you spray them or brush them?

      Thanks
      Wayne

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      • #4
        For the big items like the Gantry, E-wheel, Stands, Power Hammers, Frame jigs, etc. I use automotive paint with hardener. It stands up almost as well as powder coat. For small stuff, I just use a rattle can or powder coat depending on use or time. I've even ground and polished a few to look like chrome.

        I've never used the hammer tone or the wrinkle. I don't particularly like the look. A nice shinny tool floats my boat.

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        • #5
          Wayne02,
          Keep your money in your pocket and go the way the professionals go.

          I've tried to use the stuff since it was made just round the corner from me- 50 odd years ago. I find it continues to fail me.

          Trash can, Poubelle, Bin Day on Friday.
          Thanks for reminding me.

          Norm

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          • #6
            The virture of Hammerite is that it covers ugly well, is foolproof to apply, easy to patch.

            The vices are is the stuff is soft and easily marked up, sags like crazy if you're not careful, and it's expensive for what you get.

            I prefer a common alkyd enamel for most paint work. It's much more durable and its easy to patch and touch up. It's also low in cost.

            I know lots of people like catlyzed finishes but with shop tools the paintwork is always getting beat up or eroded with the chip wash. It's a PITA to catylize paint just to touch up a little spot with. With alkyd you can prep the patch, skim off the rind out of the paint can, and brush on a patch before you close the shop for the night. The alkyd paint will be a bit soft but ready the next morning.

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            • #7
              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Wayne02:
              Is this some sort of high durability paint or something?</font>
              Not particularly durable, no. Its chief advantage is entertainment - it's the only paint I know that doesn't just sit there. The hammer stuff spits and fizzes for a minute or so after being sprayed on, as it generates the texture. For paint, that's pretty entertaining.

              It's much more durable if you bake it after it dries.

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              • #8
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by sauer38h:
                I know that doesn't just sit there. The hammer stuff spits and fizzes for a minute or so after being sprayed on, as it generates the texture. For paint, that's pretty entertaining. </font>
                Well put, Mr Sauer!!

                [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 02-06-2006).]

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                • #9
                  Oh, Yeah?

                  Mine was baked in the Mediterannean sun and peeled and fell off.

                  Hammer(sh)ite?

                  Norm

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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by sauer38h:
                    Not particularly durable, no. Its chief advantage is entertainment - it's the only paint I know that doesn't just sit there. The hammer stuff spits and fizzes for a minute or so after being sprayed on, as it generates the texture. For paint, that's pretty entertaining.

                    It's much more durable if you bake it after it dries.

                    </font>
                    Well, we were going to the theatre next weekend but maybe our entertainment plans are changing!

                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                    • #11
                      Norm said

                      Mine was baked in the Mediterannean sun and peeled and fell off

                      well Norm that's what comes of sunbathing in the nude Alistair
                      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                      • #12
                        I like wrinkle finish paint for certain things. Black wrinkle finish has the singular advantage of not reflecting light even at a low angle of incidence. That make it good for certain applications with optical systems. I have used the hammer finish and do find it tougher, especially if baked. It is really tricky to apply so it looks good, especially on large areas.

                        As Sauer said, a good bake really helps. It drives out the volatiles and really toughens up the paint with single component paints. Don't do it in the kitchen oven unless you are single (or wish to become so).
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Well that explains my buddys reaction.. (Normans comment) he said, "that looks like Hammered dog ****".

                          I was going to paint my claw foot tub outsides with it, got it, the wire brush and all ready.

                          Now I am thinkin.
                          Excuse me, I farted.

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                          • #14
                            Your approach to painting depends on your prior experience painting, your tools and equipment available and the ability to move and mask what you are painting. Those that have access to cranes, lifts and forklifts on a 40x60 concrete shop floor with 10x20 powder coat booth in the corner with 25kw of heat lamps will do it one way, others who have to paint insitu with the 2400# mill next to the lathe and no compressor or paint gun will have to do it another. If this is the 14th machine you have refinished and you did flames and the American flag on your last '73 Chevy van repaint you have one set of expectations. If this machine will sit in your basement til after your funeral then you will have another. With all that as proviso I have been pleased with the rattle can Rustoleum Hammered paint I put on my VanNorman #12 mill a couple of years ago. Cleanup of the mill, partly disassembled, took about a month and it took 5 cans total but it has held up to the oil drips and what swarf I have thrown at it well. The color variances that the hammered look provides do mask underlying irregularities nicely. The rattle can comes in 2 shades of green, 2 gray and a sort of brown/gold and a blue. It is at both HD and Lowes.
                            Steve

                            [This message has been edited by sch (edited 02-06-2006).]
                            Steve

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                            • #15
                              Steve,
                              Question -where was Hammerite first made- and who was the bloke and where did he work before he went-West?

                              Don't look it up in Google, it's wrong.

                              said he, clearing the remains of Maleic Anhydride from his lungs! Oops.
                              N.

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