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  • Keep it Simple!

    I've been reading this forum for about a year and I think some guys try to make machining too complicated for the young guys. As far as the physics of machining go; we could hash that subject for Years! A machine tool of any type has NO conscience. It will eat you alive and tear and rip off body parts if you give it a chance. I have seen the injuries! Keep it to the basics, such as- you want a good machine tool, go for Mass. Smooth cutting; go for Mass. There are thousands of variables involved, so read ALL you can, buy the most Massive tool you can afford, Put in some steel, plastics,whatever! Take some trial cuts, make them as accurate as you can; you'll learn so much about your tools. If you are afraid of your tools; they will kill you, So, read everything! Didn't really mean to piss anybody off, but sometimes you guys are getting too complicated for the young guys!

    ------------------
    Dave da Slave

  • #2
    AH, why is youth wasted on the young

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    • #3
      I only partially agree, especially about the mass part. Working with my rigid ram CNC versus manual bridgeport is night and day difference, same goes for the 22" swing Polamco vs. 10" Logan. The Polamco will easily and accurately take 0.300 depth of cut at high speed and feed while the Logan is afraid of much more than 0.050 unless it's in back gear.

      I don't agree so much on the keep it simple part, for example I've learned quite a bit these past two years including how to program my CNC rather well, couldn't have done it without the help of this board and some of the posts I've read. I'll consider myself a decent machinist when I master thread cutting on either lathe. By it's very nature machine work is complicated, we have speeds, feeds, material choices, tool choices, setups, etc. The trick is to not overthink a project and look for easier quicker ways to do things. For example I can through a piece of stock in my CNC, write a program and bore a large hole faster than I can setup the manual mill to bore the same hole. Often I'll use my big lathe to rough a large piece in then move it between centers on the small lathe for finish work. I find I get into the most trouble when I try to oversimply things and run the wrong tool or speed etc. I find taking notes really helps in that department.

      Definately agree on the mass issue though, heck even my (new to me) power hacksaw is several times larger than I really need but it's shear mass and power allow fast square cuts even through thick stock.

      ------------------
      -Christian D. Sokolowski

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      • #4
        hmmm?

        [This message has been edited by speedy (edited 12-30-2005).]
        Ken.

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        • #5
          Dave, the Pope agrees.
          The KISS protocol is best observed; especially in the early stages.
          I cannot agree with you in respect of machinery having no conscience however. In my younger days I was honing out the bore of a die; wrapped emery tape around my finger, as you do . I was working at it well until the damned thing tried to tear off my finger; Lucky, I still have my finger AND a vivid memory of the event. That lathe let me off big time!!

          Ken
          Ken.

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          • #6
            Had that happen, also! When I was 20, a guy two machines to my right got scalped; he was running multi-spindles with 5/16 hex bar at 800 rpm, ducked under the bars ; like I told him NOT to; caught his shirt, hat hair and scalp in about 1 second. Bloody mess, about made me sick after I had to cut his scalp off the bar with scissors. The hospital tried to put it back on with no success. All that was wrapped around that bar, in 1 inch diameter.

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            Dave da Slave

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            • #7
              Never would have happened if he had a mentor like Evan

              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Millman:
              Snip&gt;; caught his shirt, &lt;end snip
              </font>

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              • #8
                What an image! That brought back the memory of working with another fitter at the glassworks. We had some cold chiselling to do with the sledgehammer; "so who is holding and who is swinging??"
                "You swing Ken, I`ll hold the chisel"
                " Are you sure?"
                " No worries mate"
                So away we go, and we were doing well for about 10 minutes then Wham!! I missed completely; the sledgehammer squashed his thumb into a bloody mush.
                He was a tough bastard and never got nasty on me either; and I wanted him to yell at me, I felt so bad.
                I still remember the man, he was a good bloke, but I can`t remember his name...

                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by zman92020:
                AH, why is youth wasted on the young</font>
                Because us old bastards would be too cautious to use it fully

                Ken
                Ken.

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                • #9
                  Thats right!

                  All of a sudden Evan's habbit of machining while naked makes perfect sense from a safety aspect.++

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                  • #10
                    I just lashed out on all six "Bull Of The Woods" volumes from Lee Valley Tools, very good, JR Williams had a sharp eye on life...





                    [This message has been edited by Peter S (edited 12-30-2005).]

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                    • #11
                      Aside from the safety part, which is always good to remember....what the heck started this?

                      I haven't seen much over-complicated whatevering here.... It seems pretty open and no silliness. Evan seems to do much with nearly nothing, others seem to do the same.

                      Once in a while a question gets complicated, but when I have seen it, it is complex for a reason I can understand. That's OK.

                      Maybe I missed it?

                      BTW... rsr11: you need to fix your Logan.... Mine takes 0.150 DOC whenever I want it to, depending on material. Takes that 0.050 in 1.5" 4140 PH material, not in back gear.

                      The flat belt is the limit on mine, 1 HP at 1000 fpm, but usually you can't get 1000 fpm. That's the other reason for back gear, to get the fpm up on the belt.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

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                      • #12
                        Ok, how about this then..

                        I'm thinking Lathemaster.

                        The 8x14 at 220lbs vs the 9x30 at 340lbs iirc.

                        Price difference is 377 bucks.

                        That 377 worth the extra weight and bed length?

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                        • #13
                          Well. I think like this...

                          You can make R/C car parts on a 14x48" lathe
                          but can you make real car parts on a 7x12" lathe?

                          ------------------
                          The tame Wolf !

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                          • #14
                            True wolf, very true.

                            That being said, I've asked everyone I know around here that has a 14x48 or better, how much of it they actually use.... The answer I always got, was the first foot of it. So, what's the extra 30 some odd inches good for? Collecting dust and oil, most of the time.

                            Space and money are tight and I have't yet come up with any ideas that would exceed a 9x30's capabilities as of yet. That's the size for me at this time I thinking.

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                            • #15
                              I have a South Bend Lathe group with some simple (not many precision tools required) approach. Sure i can use all the fancy tools but i chose not to for the guys that don't have them yet. So if anybody wants to learn from a simple "knucklehead" (ME) come on in...Bob
                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/

                              ------------------
                              Bob Wright
                              Salem, Oh Birthplace of The Silver & Deming Drill
                              Bob Wright
                              Salem, Oh Birthplace of The Silver & Deming Drill

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