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Mill work holding clamps (home made ?)

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  • Mill work holding clamps (home made ?)

    I would like some of the clamps that hold the work on the edge as opposed to the top clamping fixtures we know and love. I have seen commercial offset clamps that work on a cam system and fix to the side of metal sheets, etc. and hold very well. My idea is to leave the top surface completely free for flycutting, etc.I wonder if anyone has made these or others at home they don't look too difficult. Perhaps someone has their own designs please show or explain them as I am keen to do this as a small project. Why you ask answer because they seem prohibitively expensive to buy for what they are. Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    I took some one inch cylinders (2..) and took three pieces of angle, two anchors ends, other was the second vise, all were bolted to t-nuts.

    As the part was laid on the table you applied air, the sliding angle went forward to the plate *drilling multiple holes/slotting, held off bed on plywood scrap.. I tightened the sliding angle each time.

    Sorry for the poor description, I have no pictures. MY CNC, it is fast, setup and re-zeroing something too large for the vise is not. You'll see pencil marks on the bed when something has to be repeated.. yeah.. that's me, hillbilly..

    Wedges would work equally well.

    I have saw people on the net use two sided tape.. yeah.. right.. I broke two or three cutters putting the hp into the work..
    Excuse me, I farted.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree, unless you are buying questionable chicom soft metal junk, strap clamps, or milling clamps, or whatever you want to call them, are darned expensive. I'd expect that a lot of this is due to the fact that many of them are forged.
      James Kilroy

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      • #4
        http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Carver-Edge-Gr...QQcmdZViewItem

        all the best...mark

        Comment


        • #5
          Have seen some of the double sided tape used for clamps for sheet goods. they do make different holding power ( in pounds it will hold up) on the tape also the thin foam tape that is used to hold the badges and trim on the cars comes in various strenghts. 3M is the biggest maker of differing grades of the tape products. I got some sample rolls from them when I was at a sign biz show years ago. If you go to the auto parts/paint store to get the foam tape they probally will have a 3M catalog. To make rewmoving the foam tape easier use a hair dryer or heat gun.
          I have wondered if you could hot glue the sheet goods to something thicker and clamp against that. You can also get hot glues in differening streghts of hold power. You may have seen the dent puller on TV. And now for something completely different.

          These are printer equipment from the letterpress days used for clamping the loose type cuts and borders in place for printing.


          The items come in handy if you can find them for bars to lift up and level work or the clamps. on different machines. the printers furniture as came in hardwood which was used for the same purpose.
          You can find it at fleamarkets some times they like the old type trays called type cases. You can also check Leev valley tools for ideas on clamping wonder is the vacuum table would work.
          http://www.leevalley.com/home/main.asp


          ------------------
          Glen
          Been there, probally broke it doing that

          [This message has been edited by PTSideshow (edited 01-03-2006).]

          [This message has been edited by PTSideshow (edited 01-03-2006).]
          Glen
          Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
          I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
          All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

          Comment


          • #6
            Alistair,

            Okay, you said “homemadeâ€‌ and “inexpensiveâ€‌! I made some and they worked fairly well but have only used them a couple of times and don’t know the longevity of them. Anyway…

            Example for T-nuts that are for a 9/16 - inch bolt: I used some 9/16 X 1 inch socket head cap screws and machined the side of the bolt head so that it had about 0.010 inch eccentric. Any more than that would have weakened the socket part of the bolt and also would have made too much of a cam angle so that it could vibrate loose when machining. I then machined a brass “washerâ€‌ that was smaller than the bolt head and about 1/8 – inch thick - placed on the bolt between the head and the table. This was used because as the bolt is tightened for the “camâ€‌ action it will “crushâ€‌ a bit and hold the cam in place. You’ll have to have extra brass washers because they will eventually crush beyond the bolt head and be in the way. Also, the bolts must be threaded all the way to the head. Remember to have the bolt threads short enough such that when they are tightened they don’t go thru the T-nut as this can easily break the T-slot in your table.

            If the head of the bolt is too high, you can also machine off the top as long as you have enough left for the allen wrench to hold.

            Cost? About $0.25 each! Is that cheap enough for you?

            Mike

            ____________________



            [This message has been edited by Mike Burdick (edited 01-03-2006).]

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            • #7
              Where the heck will ah get twuntie five cents mister ahm Scottish di yeh no ken, seriously looking good thanks bud.Alistair
              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

              Comment


              • #8
                Allistar,

                Here is a clamp that allows full access made from scrap aluminum plate. The plates are held to the mill table by T-nuts and studs. The socket head screw angles down very slightly to help prevent the work from lifting off the table. The end of the screw does leave a mark in the work piece, but not too bad, certainly commenserate with the price.


                Comment


                • #9
                  Tubal Cain,
                  Thin piece vice from Simple Workshop Devices.

                  Yes, Brother Alistair, it's that man again.

                  Norm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ibender that's a good design could you not put slight packing strips between the nut end and the workpiece to prevent marking?Alistair
                    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Alistar,

                      Yes, you can put a packing piece between the end of the screw and the work. This eliminates the damage to the work with an increase in the chance the work will lift off the table. I have used this setup both with and without packing depending on my tolerance for the ding in the side of the work piece.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Alistair,

                        If you've got any books on using a shaper you'll probably find what you are looking for in there.

                        Basically you need something that is putting a sideways and downward force onto the workpiece,

                        Allan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by lbender:
                          Alistar,

                          Yes, you can put a packing piece between the end of the screw and the work. This eliminates the damage to the work with an increase in the chance the work will lift off the table. I have used this setup both with and without packing depending on my tolerance for the ding in the side of the work piece.
                          </font>
                          When I used to pull barrels off firearms using bored hardwood blocks, I used lead sheet as a packing. Occasionally I'd put some violin players rosin powder on the lead to make sure thing didn't slip and scratch the blueing. If you try that you must first clean everyting with alcholol for firm grip.

                          For my wood working, I clamped a buttress board to the opposite side of my workbench to position the wood I was working on. Then I made a cam/paddle, drilled a hole thru it and my workbench and was able to cam actuate the thing when sanding, dovetailing and carving. I trapped the piece I was working on between the cam and the buttress board. It was a great time saver. No reason such a cam couldn't be incorporated into the setup that Ibender has going for him In the pictured post above.

                          Let us know what you come up with.

                          - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                          • #14
                            How about this one Alistair?

                            http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...lr%3D%26sa%3DN

                            edited to add:
                            looks like you'll have to cut and paste it to the address box in your browser. Even with the . . show as a link.

                            [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 01-03-2006).]

                            edited to further add:

                            What the hell? It's working!


                            [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 01-03-2006).]

                            [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 01-03-2006).]
                            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                            Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                            It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Alistair
                              Check out the "Home Metal Shop Club" web site and go to the May 2002 newsletter. I have an article on a set of T Slot clamps I fabricated using hex nuts and socket head screws with an eccentric head.
                              J. R. Williams

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