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Suggestions for running power from ceiling down to shop bench.

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  • Suggestions for running power from ceiling down to shop bench.


    I want to run power from the ceiling down to my shop bench and was wondering what the best method would be for doing this. I was thinking of going from an electrical box mounted on the ceiling down to the side of my shop bench using condiut pipe to another electrical box mounted on the side of my shop table. This would mean I have a condiut pipe running from the ceiling down to one side of my shop bench.

    I could also run a condiut pipe on the floor over to my shop bench but that means I'll be walking over the condiut pipe a lot (Or walking over a raised /\ etc.)

    Any ideas what the best approach would be? Anyone know what the electrical code(s) suggest for doing this?

    Thanks,

    -Adrian

  • #2
    Don't put it on the floor!

    Conduit will work, not sure what Code says, but shouldn't be a problem. I'd do it that way or use Wire-Mold if it needs to look nice or you want the corners to be square. Run a separate ground wire either way.

    uute

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    • #3
      BTW, my shop bench is not against a wall so I either wire it up with a run from the ground, or a drop from the ceiling.

      Which is better?

      If I wire it from the ground, I'll run condiut under a "ramp". If I wire it from the ceiling, I'll run condiut from a ceiling mounted box down to a box mounted on the side of my bench.

      -Adrian

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      • #4
        Conduit is ok but the plug in the ceiling is probably switched for your garage door opener(s). You'll also have to break into the dry wall to make a "correct" connection.

        A cleaner install would be to fish the wire through the joists or use the circuit that's already in the wall. But of course, we're in a rush aren't we.

        No mater. It won't hold up in a blizzard.

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        • #5
          UpP would be fine if it came up right under the bench (like thru the floor) but not if it has to traverse any working space.

          Island bench: consider running 2x4 or other "stiffener" for conduit, or if the bench may be moves some, armored cable (flexible conduit) may be an option, but is liable to get wacked by long material being moved around.

          uute

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          • #6
            Another option would be to mount an outlet on ceiling, plug in w/ heavy cord, then if you hit it, you just pull the plug out - no harm, no foul! (unles it is a 20ft ceiling)
            uute

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            • #7
              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
              Conduit is ok but the plug in the ceiling is probably switched for your garage door opener(s). You'll also have to break into the dry wall to make a "correct" connection.

              A cleaner install would be to fish the wire through the joists or use the circuit that's already in the wall. But of course, we're in a rush aren't we.

              No mater. It won't hold up in a blizzard.
              </font>

              Huh? I'm running a completely new circuit from my shop panel completely inside of conduit mounted on the walls. I'm going to either run it up along the ceiling and down to my bench, or down along the floor and up to my bench.

              The ceiling plugs were there when the house was built. One pair of plugs is switched off the light switch, and another pair is always on for the garage doors. When I install new garage doors/openers I'll run a new circuit from my shop pannel for that instead of use those existing ceiling plugs.

              -Adrian

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              • #8
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by uute:
                Island bench: consider running 2x4 or other "stiffener" for conduit, or if the bench may be moves some, armored cable (flexible conduit) may be an option, but is liable to get wacked by long material being moved around.

                uute
                </font>
                Thanks! I just got an idea. I'll build a square column (maybe 6x6") from the ceiling down to the floor and provide 4 outlets on each side of the column. I'll add hangers to the column too for hanging power cords, etc.

                -Adrian

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                • #9
                  Stay off the floor.

                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">I was thinking of going from an electrical box mounted on the ceiling down to the side of my shop bench using condiut(sic) pipe to another electrical box mounted on the side of my shop table.</font>
                  I didn't know when your house was built or how you were going to tie it in. It wasn't clear from the above statement. It sounded like you were going to put conduit to an old flush box.

                  Many had a plug in the ceiling that was switched. It could be for a light or for a GD opener.

                  The older openers had to be turned off or unplugged when you went away for a few days or even overnight. If you didn't, the door would open every time a airplane went over or the guy down the street opened his. A strong CB radio would open it too.

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                  • #10
                    The drop for cords from over head is 6feet or less they have a speacial clamp goes on the cable/cord that has a strain relief buit in. but a conduit ridgid would work with out a column, as long as it was anchored at the top and bottom. if you use ridgid in 1/2 or 3/4" you can use plumbing theader tool to put some back on if you have to cut the piece.

                    ------------------
                    Glen
                    Been there, probally broke it doing that
                    Glen
                    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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                    • #11
                      SO rubber cord drops are allowed here,so long as you use a strain relief on the ceiling end(thing that looks like a Chinese handcuff)
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Adrian, how about an articulated arm of two 4' sections and a swivel mounted near the center of your shop, with a #10/3 drop. This should cover much of the interior of the shop. Extended (4' + 4' = 8' radius), it would cover a 16' circle. When you are done, merely swing it off to the side. The swivel and the 'elbow' should be a snap to fab in an hour or so. I'm sure you have tabs galore from your cart. LOD

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Adrian, how about an articulated arm of two 4' sections and a swivel mounted near the center of your shop, with a #10/3 drop. This should cover much of the interior of the shop. Extended (4' + 4' = 8' radius), it would cover a 16' circle. When you are done, merely swing it off to the side. The swivel and the 'elbow' should be a snap to fab in an hour or so. I'm sure you have tabs galore from your cart. LOD

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Adrian, how about an articulated arm of two 4' sections and a swivel mounted near the center of your shop, with a #10/3 drop. This should cover much of the interior of the shop. Extended (4' + 4' = 8' radius), it would cover a 16' circle. When you are done, merely swing it off to the side. The swivel and the 'elbow' should be a snap to fab in an hour or so. I'm sure you have tabs galore from your cart. LOD

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hey 3-Ph...

                              E-mail me and I'll send some pic's of my install. I think you'll like it, and it didn't cost much.

                              also air lines are in there. By the way I went to electric heat and it's dry and warm. But I think I will faint at the next "bill"

                              [email protected]



                              ------------------
                              Norm'
                              If it's not broken, why do I keep trying to fix it....
                              Norm'
                              Member C.A.L.S. Balt'
                              If it's not broken, why do I keep trying to fix it....

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