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Buffalo #1/2 Ironworker specs?

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  • #16
    The levers compound the tonnage put on them.

    The scotchman will punch 1/2" through 1/2 plate easily, but you look, it is a 6" cylinder there on the end of the fulcrum arm about three feet away. Not sure how much pressure is pushing. No guage on that one.

    You need a way to "guide" the punch, guide the shear.. Buying a complete unit that goes onto a ironworker is the "premade" deal. www.grainger.com has them, along with edwards. along with..

    If I was going all the way again, I'd build a H-press, then outfit it with tubing benders and punches, and shears, and sheetmetal dies, and ..... Hard to let anything around here just do one thing.

    I looked to see where you are? I got a H- frame sitting here rusting. No hydraulics.. but then.. HF has a 50 ton for $699..complete.
    Excuse me, I farted.

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    • #17
      Update on the Buffalo:
      I've been in touch with Buffalo machine tools and found out that this #1/2 was built in 1947.
      A replacement drive pinion (gear) is available - for $1150...
      Anyone have any ideas for an alternate source
      for a pinion?


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      • #18
        Thanks for the offer but I already have a H-frame...that is why I am interested in hearing and seeing what others have done to enhance their presses.

        Has anyone else enhanced their H-frame? If so, pictures would be great.

        TMT

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        • #19
          The problem with using a H press to punch holes is that you can only punch holes in stuff that fits inside the press frame.
          I built a big H press a few years ago, and copied the enerpac presses- I have the cylinder assembly clamped to the top frame member with 4 bolts, so if I loosen them, I can slide the cylinder assembly left or right, giving me more flexibility.

          The very first Scotchman ironworkers, like the one David has, also had inboard punches- it is easier to get the pressure this way.
          The later ones, and most commercial ironworkers, have a C shaped open throat for the punch- its a lot more flexible, as you can punch holes in the edges of really big pieces.

          Scotchman ironworkers started out with a "tooling bay" where different ironworker modules got interchanged-
          this would be an easy way to use a H frame hydraulic press- you can buy really good modules from Scotchman, but they cost about a grand apiece, for press brake, round bar, square bar, and angle shears.
          There are cheaper, lighter duty ones available for the metal pro, from Northern Sales.
          Unfortunately, neither of them sell punch modules, as the punch station is the one that is built in and dedicated on both ironworkers.
          Here is the scotchman page of tooling-
          http://www.scotchman.com/special_tooling.php

          Lower priced ironworkers from most makers use the lever principle, but the better ironworkers use machined vertical slides- which eliminates the arc the punch travels in- its very slight, and undetectable in most uses, but if you think about it, if the punch is at the outboard end of the lever, it is scribing an arc, rather than a straight up and down punching motion.
          For very precise punching, you want that up and down- which the Peddinghaus, and Mubea ironworkers from germany have- at twice, or more, the cost.

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          • #20
            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Herb W:
            Update on the Buffalo:
            I've been in touch with Buffalo machine tools and found out that this #1/2 was built in 1947.
            A replacement drive pinion (gear) is available - for $1150...
            Anyone have any ideas for an alternate source
            for a pinion?


            </font>
            Get the specs on the gear,tooth count,pa,face width etc and contact these folks-

            http://www.linngear.com/

            I have bought several large gears from them in the past,they are very reasonable.You may be able to get a stock gear from them for less than $100 depending on what the gear is.

            I just need one more tool,just one!

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