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Snowplow mounted on truck (pictures)

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  • Snowplow mounted on truck (pictures)

    I finished the snow plow and mounted it on my truck today. I just need to wire up the controls inside. I think this is the first time I'm wishing for snow to fall now







    -Adrian

  • #2
    Adrian,

    I'm not sure which will buckle first, the winch mast or the lower blade supports. I suggest fully triangulating the winch mast and hooking the cable to the top crossbar on the blade. When you hit a small bump with the truck the entire assembly will bounce with several gees of force.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
      Adrian,

      I'm not sure which will buckle first, the winch mast or the lower blade supports. I suggest fully triangulating the winch mast and hooking the cable to the top crossbar on the blade. When you hit a small bump with the truck the entire assembly will bounce with several gees of force.
      </font>
      Yup, that's my main concern right now. The mast is 1 1/4" .120" wall so I think my push arms will bend first.. They have large rubber bushings so that's what you see compressing, then the blade lifts after the rubber compresses. Clearly not ideal but I'm getting close. I'm think triangulating the winch outward more towards the blade and lifting the blade itself at a more shallow angle would be good..

      -Adrian

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      • #4
        I would have made it all out of two by two heavy section box.
        that things going to be pushing over a ton and a half of snow.!!
        thats me though.
        no complaints about your workmanship..excellent.

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        • #5
          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by aboard_epsilon:
          I would have made it all out of two by two heavy section box.
          that things going to be pushing over a ton and a half of snow.!!
          thats me though.
          no complaints about your workmanship..excellent.
          </font>
          I can push a ton and a half with my pinky finger..

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          • #6
            Nice work. This do not means good work.hأ© hأ©.
            By experience this size of blade packed with heavy snow will weight close to a ton. Since Monday we had to remove 2 ft of that white ****. 21 miles of rural roads

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            • #7
              Don't know where you guys are getting all this "tonnage" for snow. Even if it was packed solid into a chunk of ice, one cubic yard will weigh about 1,685lbs.

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              • #8
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
                Don't know where you guys are getting all this "tonnage" for snow. Even if it was packed solid into a chunk of ice, one cubic yard will weigh about 1,685lbs.

                </font>
                edited to eliminate one mangled double post. Seems to take the servor some time to spit these post up there.

                [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 12-29-2005).]
                - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                • #9
                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Your Old Dog:
                  </font>

                  Those figures look similar to the ones in the Western and Meyer's snowplow manuals. The figures take into account the weight of the snow has to be pushed down the drive. Oh heavy wet snow it is a chore for my 350 Chevy 4X4. Many times my truck is brought to a halt by the load of snow up front. When angled, the plow will be shot off to the right or left.

                  The vertical geometry will become important because the blade will tend to glide over top of the snow if the attack angle of cutting edge of the blade is not just right. You can use that trait to good advantage as you ride in on a bank you goose the hydraulics up a tad and the blade starts to trip. This allows you to stack the snow higher at the end of the lot then the cab of the truck if the springs are adjusted just right.
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's what I do with the Rover. Although the blade lift is only about 2 feet max the blade can go up to about 5 feet on the hinges. I can pile the snow about that high by lifting it as I hit the pile.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      Thinking about it, for the cost of the body repair on your truck when that setup crumbles and smashes the front of your truck, you could of bought a new snow plow, maybe. The dinky little plow on our dinky little garden tractor was much, much more heavily built. I respect all the work you put into the plow, I just dont want to see you having to pay for body work if that fails, murphys law you know. Dont under estimate the forces involved here, you could end up having a very bad day.

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                      • #12
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BillH:
                        Thinking about it, for the cost of the body repair on your truck when that setup crumbles and smashes the front of your truck, you could of bought a new snow plow, maybe. The dinky little plow on our dinky little garden tractor was much, much more heavily built. I respect all the work you put into the plow, I just dont want to see you having to pay for body work if that fails, murphys law you know. Dont under estimate the forces involved here, you could end up having a very bad day.</font>

                        What specifically do you think will fail?

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                        • #13
                          Yo, Adrian (heh, not like you haven't heard that one before...)

                          First thing that's going to happen, is it's going to fold or fail where the lower arms attach to the blade. You have two pretty small bolts in single-shear, and worse yet, rubber mounted, which will allow them to twist (which will in turn force the tab to start twisting.)

                          The rams are stronger than the arms and pivot, so I suspect the first time you run into any sort of obstacle at all, the blade will pivot on the ram mounts as the lower arms bend and spread (or snap bolts or tabs and spread.)

                          Past that, your pivot-to-body framework is FAR too spindly, and poorly triangulated. Depending on what you hit, look for it to rapidly fold sideways.

                          I understand you have a short, paved driveway and will be moving minimal snow. But as the other guys pointed out, the weight and sliding friction builds up in a big hurry. You shouls have made the blade literally about a quarter to one-third the size it is. That would reduce the forces and probably allow your structure to live.

                          The homebrew plow on my truck (I didn't build it, but I've had to fix and upgrade it) probaboy weighs 800+ pounds. The face is 3/16" steel- and it's been bulged by snow a little bit- with 1/4" plate wings. The A-frame pivot is gusseted 1/2" wall angle, with a 1" grade-8 center pivot and two 3/4" hitch-pin frame pivots. The ram structure is welded to the frame (old Chevy beater) and tied to the frame from the pivot back to just ahead of the axle bumpstops, by 2" by 3/8" angle and bolted on with spreader plates.

                          And yes, we've bent everything at least once, sheared the 1" bolt at least once, and w ekeep piling on weld and reinforcement every time we break it again.

                          It's finally to the point I haven't had to fix it in a couple of years, and admittedly I have way more to plow than you do, but really, unless you're very careful, and take small, slow passes, I doubt your build there will last even most of the winter without some serious repair and reinforcement.

                          Doc.
                          Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                          • #14
                            i think i'd be most worried about the winch mast, very nice craftsmanship though. Looks very neat and well put together. I'd also be worried about your tabs/brackets bending. They look like mayber 1/4 or 3/16 strap. If it was me i'd feel more comfortable with a clevis and clevis pin with 1/4 or thicker. Theres alot of weight in snow; i was asked to weld up an "industrial" snow plow my school had for several years. They broke a mount that was 1/2 thick, about 5" wide piece of strap rolled into a half-cirlce.

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                            • #15
                              Adrian,
                              How are you going to actuate the angle cylinders?

                              Mike

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