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  • work holding faceplate

    I have to clamp four or eight 1/4" X 1/2" pieces approximately 2" to 2.5" long at 90 degrees radially on face plate to cut radial slots in pieces. My face plate has 6 radial slots. Any easy way to clamp, or would building a jig to clamp on the face plate be a better idea? All 8 pieces should be identical.

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  • #2
    A rotary table and a mill would make it a piece of cake. What's the radius of the slot?

    Maybe a round plate to clamp them all down at once might work with light cuts. How close to "identical" do they need to be?

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    • #3
      Unless I'm misunderstanding your needs,
      this sounds like a good use for a four jaw chuck.

      Alex
      Alex

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      • #4
        I doubt a four jaw would work if I understand the set up. A rotary table and mill won't work unless he owns them, and fixturing to a rotary table will present much the same problems.

        It would probably be simplest to fab something like a low profile vise with set screws to hold the work. Banking strips could be provided to ensure each part would be installed in the same location for repeatability.

        The faceplate should be considered as consumable tooling. Tapping holes for tricky setups is not forbidden. If you want to preserve the faceplate, a subplate can be installed and replaced when there is no room left for holes.

        Jim H.

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        • #5
          CCWKen
          All I have is a SB 10" so I need to work on face plate.The parts are layed out like a plus sign. The slots are layed out with center at crossing. I do not know size of slots yet. Depends on what heavy walled pipe my local hydrolics shop has laying around.

          Alex
          By identical I mean +- .01" How would I clamp them in 4 jaw at 90 Deg.

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          • #6
            Related to this is a freeware program avalable to make sketch drawings to post on photobucket?So I can add to this BBS?

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            • #7
              Look under your Accessories folder for "Paint". It's pretty basic but allows you to draw with lines, rectangles and circles. Even freehand, it you have the knack. Probably enough to get your basic ideas down.

              JC, I only mentioned RT and mill as an alternative. What's so hard about setting a couple of bolts up on an RT as a jig? Clamp one piece down in the jig and crank it through. They don't all have to be cut at the same time. The simple jig takes care of it.

              Your own solution is duplicating the setup--Just more complicated.

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              • #8
                CCWKen
                I thought with mounting 4 or 8 on face plate
                it would be easier to make parts the same. This is to make spacers to center two heavy walled pipes one inside of other. A heavy flat plate would work except I need to get between pipes to put in coils.

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                • #9
                  I was suggesting the round plate to hold down your pieces--As a clamp. Getting them all lined up would be up to you.

                  With that small of pieces, I'd just bolt a jig to your faceplate and cut one at a time. The jig will make it easy to duplicate the position. Use HSS or Cobalt bits. Carbide won't like the interrupted cuts.

                  You won't be spinning the heck out it so the out of balance shouldn't hurt.

                  Dang! Tubes, coils? Sounds like some kind of nuclear devise.

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                  • #10
                    CCWKen
                    Jest experimental motor I have been playing with in my mind. Did some tests now to point of trying demo unit & see how it goes.

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                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
                      JC, I only mentioned RT and mill as an alternative. What's so hard about setting a couple of bolts up on an RT as a jig? Clamp one piece down in the jig and crank it through. They don't all have to be cut at the same time. The simple jig takes care of it.

                      Your own solution is duplicating the setup--Just more complicated.
                      </font>
                      If you do not have a rotary table and milling machine, it makes it very difficult to accomplish.

                      Since the question was specifically how to set up on a faceplate, I assumed (correctly) the lathe with faceplate was the only tooling available to use. At that point, rotary tables, mills, CNC's, lasers, plasma cutters or any other method becomes meaningless.


                      With the small number of parts involved, and the equipment available for the job, machining one part at a time in a simple jig is probably one of the better solutions.

                      The basic set up to use a fixture to machine the parts individually on a faceplate or rotary table is still the same. The R/T may not require as secure a mounting, but as mentioned that makes no difference in this application.

                      Your follow up response simply repeats my original suggestion.

                      "With that small of pieces, I'd just bolt a jig to your faceplate and cut one at a time. The jig will make it easy to duplicate the position. Use HSS or Cobalt bits. Carbide won't like the interrupted cuts."


                      Jim H.

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                      • #12
                        A picture should make it clear.



                        Light cuts at lower speeds.

                        Alex
                        Alex

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                        • #13
                          Thank You All

                          I think I will try the jig becouse I need to make the slots close to the end of the pieces. I dont want to risk a crash in the 4 jaw.

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                          • #14
                            Or turn the whole thing around - hold the 1/4" x 1/2" bars in the toolpost (or clamp them to the cross slide) and fix a fly cutter to the faceplate.

                            Ian
                            All of the gear, no idea...

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                            • #15
                              Don't think I understand your set-up, but here's an idea anyway. Can you put 2 bolt throu faceplate slots, secure w/ nuts or T-nuts. Use these bolt heads to register work, clamp to them w/ small block treaded for clamp screw - also bolted in faceplate slot.

                              Just a thought, You'll know if this will fly.
                              ute

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