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Hammers and dollies and files. Oh my!

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  • #16
    CCWKen,

    No, he didn't mention a shrink disk. And he didn't mention doing any metal shaping (as in fabrication).

    There are only 14 class sessions so I can understand why we won't get into metal shaping but I'd really like to learn more about it.

    I did mention in another thread how I had a chance to play with plastic hammers and a a leather shot bag. I then played around with the English wheel. But that stuff was all on my own.

    I wish they had a whole class on sheet metal fabrication.

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    • #17
      Dan, this thread brings nack some not so fond memories
      I took an autobody course some time ago.
      One of the first things we had to do was cut out a piece of 20 guauge and fit it into this funny looking 18" square box frame.
      Oh boy...now we had to take hammer and dolly and beat on that thing until it was up 1 1/2" in the center and a near perfect dome. Not so bad...ooops...along comes the ol' instructor and makes us heat and shrink the whole thing down to a 1" drop so it looked like a big salad bowl.
      Hmmm...that took a day.
      Then we had to raise the whole darn thing up again. When it was near perfect 1" high dome again....the ol' jerk comes along and drives a sharpend chipping hammer right through it.
      So, then you get to repair the hole with O/A and shrink/stretch the whole thing back into the 1 1/2" high dome. When it looks good then you finish the surface off with body files and lead until it's perfect.
      Whole process takes over a week.
      The entire north wing of the college just hates panel beating time.
      You can imagine the noise when 25 students are hammering(and cursing) for over a week.
      You may change your mind about O/A when you have to repair a large panel where you can't get in behind to dolly it. The metal shrinkage from O/A welding can be frustrating, especially with the thin metal used on more modern vehicles.
      Russ
      I have tools I don't even know I own...

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      • #18
        "You may change your mind about O/A when you have to repair a large panel where you can't get in behind to dolly it. The metal shrinkage from O/A welding can be frustrating, especially with the thin metal used on more modern vehicles."

        I agree 100%. I know MIG is the way to go in that situation. To do things right in autobody work I would think a person should have a MIG welder and an O/A outfit. They each have their places.

        I've O/A welded 2 pieces of sheet metal together and watched the pieces rise like butterfly wings as the filler metal cooled.

        If you can't get to both side of the weld you can't make it flat.

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