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  • Internal splines

    I have been asked by a friend to make a coupling to connect the engine to the lift mechanism for an old forklift. The shaft sticking out is 1 9/16 inches in diameter, 1 1/4 inches long, and has 19 splines. I would be perfectly happy to find a coupling for him instead of having to make one. Does anyone know where to look ? I have never cut an internal spline. How would I go about cutting one if I have to do this job?
    Richard Montgomery
    Robert, LA

  • #2
    The best way to do this is use a broach with the same profile...This particular broach will be extremely expensive, so the alternative is to make your own broach out of some drill rod....This is actually kind of fun..I have made similar broaches myself, and it works!!! It just takes a little patience,,,

    brent

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    • #3
      You may want to tell your friend to check out a job shop with a ram type EDM and get a quote on getting one burned out.

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      • #4
        Is it a through hole? If so get agoute from a wire shop.
        Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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        • #5
          If it is a through hole, and big enough, you could use a boring bar in a lathe.

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          • #6
            If your friend is going to contribute financially for your efforts and is not just giving you this job just so you can gain some "experience", 1. measure the width of the Male splines on the shaft. 2. chuck up the workpiece in the lathe and drill and bore it to the size of the Minor Diameter. 3. paint one end with lay-out dye 4. lay out the centers of the female portion of the splines. May have to do this on a piece of paper first to get them equal. 19?? Brr! Then broach the female grooves one at a time and be prepared to do a bit of finish filing when you are through. Good Luck!!

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            • #7
              I have cut internal splines on my mill with the use of a 3jaw chuck mounted to a rotary table with a profile cutter of the spline mounted in the spindle. Using the spindle handle to stroke the cutter through the hole and then advance the table for each stroke until the desired depth of the spline is reached. Then rotate the table to the next spline cut and so on. Are you sure on the 19 splines since this is going to be an odd degree. An 18 spline would be 20 degrees and 20 would be 18 degrees but a 19 would 18.95 degrees which is going to be hard to keep track of as you rotate around the hole.

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              • #8
                Go to any farm supply center and see if they can match up a coupling from a company called Hub City, they make most of the spline and couplings for off road and heavy equipment manufactures and after market suppliers.
                George Hawkins

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                • #9
                  Are these involute or straight splines? If you guys know the PA pitch # try Standard Drive Products in NY.
                  Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                  • #10
                    Radmachine:
                    Tell the cheap bastard to order one from the maker of the forklift or go to an industrial wrecker.

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                    • #11
                      Try Burden's Surplus center
                      1-800-488-3407 They sometimes have various spline adapters in stock. As far as I know they don't have a website yet. Ask for a catalog while your on the phone. They have all sorts of stuff, reasonable prices too.

                      [This message has been edited by yf (edited 11-30-2002).]

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for all the help, guys. Yes, I am being paid for this job. The forklift in question has been around for a long time, so long that all the nameplates are gone. We have no idea who made it. I have dividing plates for my rotary table, so cutting 19 teeth won't be a problem.
                        Richard Montgomery
                        Robert, LA

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                        • #13
                          You might ask at a automatic transmission rebuild shop,specializing in heavy duty trannys. Might not be that rare.

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                          • #14
                            rad,

                            Sounds like you have things covered.
                            You being a machinist, this should be no major problem.
                            So let the chips fly.
                            Good slotting.

                            mite

                            p.s. : If you goof it up, there's room in the scrap box for one more part.
                            I always manage to find room in mine.

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