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  • Titanium

    I have some 6AL4V .040 sheet titanium on hand to made liner lock knives with. What type speed should I be running my mill at? What type end mill (HSS,Carbide or whatever) should I be using? What type of lube should I use.

    Jerry

  • #2
    Cut titanium alloy with high speed or positive rake carbide tooling. Cut it like stainless.

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    • #3
      Cutting titanium generates a LOT of heat, so you probably do want some kind of coolant. For the few times I've worked with titanium, I've used mist cooling. I had good luck with "wicked sharp" HSS.

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      • #4
        I have worked a lot of Titanium for my knives and parts. I have found that you have great results with the following rule of thumb.
        First only use HSS cutters. Carbide will not give you precision results for your final cut because you have to use too much tool presure with a carbide insert ( carbide cutting edge is rounded at microscopic level where HSS is not.) HSS will always leave you with a sharp finish.
        Second, feed & speed is kind of a guessing game, but my expreiances have left me with a system that works well for me. Figure out what feed and speed would be appropate for a stainless steel part of similar dimensions, and reduce cutter speed by half. Feed rate is a moderate pressure type feed, slower being better.Since Ti alloy is kind of gummy, this gives the cutter a longer chance to get a " bite".Patinence with Ti is truly a virtue.
        I have used a mist system but if you are doing every thing right, you won't need anything special, maybe just a spray bottle with soapy water...
        Jerry, I don't mean to be nosey, but 0.040 for a liner lock is a little light. A heavy load on the blade might start a little flexing action...My experiance has left me with a minium standard of 0.065 and 0.085 being ideal. It looks a beefy in the handle but my knives never slip.
        Hope this helps.
        Charles

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        • #5
          I'd go along with Charles, and Addy on this one - but you can use Carbide end mills and slot drills so long as they are real sharp, freshly ground; I do agree that inserted TCT cutters are generally not good (as Forrest Addy has iterated the edge needs to be positive rake to cut clean). Stay clear of Tian coated HSS cutters - I have found these have a tendency to 'pick up'. M42 works well in straight HSS Co.

          As for lubricant, and seeing as your DOC's are likely to only be shaving skims, soapy water is OK; for heavy cutting I prefer a Vegetable based cutting oil.

          Don't let it rub, slower cutter speeds and consistent feed is required. As Charles has said patience with Ti is a virtue, if not a neccesity!

          RR

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