Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

screw machine

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Evan
    replied
    bump

    Leave a comment:


  • BudB
    replied
    I grew up in a screw machine shop with Davenports and B&S's in Indy. I've been gone a long time, shop has been sold, but I can still smell the "oil" and hear the rattle of the machines.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hell, anyone can be a " qualified " machinist with the acute ability to push a start button! I've talked to those guys who wouldn't have the slightest idea how to make a part on a manual machine; but they are called "machinists". You have to laugh in their face!

    ------------------
    BFH

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    I have to differ with tattoo' on this. Omni-turns can not be picked up for anywhere near the price of a screw machine.

    I bought a couple B&S's a few years ago for $100 each. Tooling would be, maybe, $200 to get a good start.

    An Omni-turn will run in the $15K+/- range.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by slayer666:
    tattoomike68,

    Would it be possible to later convert a lathe like the one you showed to operate similar to an automatic? Do you know of anyone who has done this?
    </font>

    No I dont think it would be worth doing,by the time it was all rigged up you can get a cnc lathe for less cost. A cnc can cut complex shapes where as with a screw machine tooling cost are insane. to tool up a screw machine it is best to have a surface grinder and a wire edm.$$$$$$$$$$$$$

    here are some videos of a fine little cnc that can be set up to very automatic.
    A used omni-turn that has made millions of parts can be found cheap, repace the ball screws and run the hell out of it.
    http://www.omni-turn.com/Pages/Videos/Video%20page.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Rustybolt
    replied
    [quote]<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by DBW:
    Originally posted by slayer666:
    Does anyone know what the smallest screw machine ever commercially manufactured is? Pics?[/Q

    Screw machines are dead as a dodo. NCR had one of the largest B&S shops in the world with over 100 machines. Actioned them all off and went to solid state designed office machines.
    Why not put steppers and cnc control on your
    lathe and play with something new and learn
    G code.

    </font>

    That would be my recomendation. But if he's got his heart set on it, go for it. He should be able to get a 00 fully tooled and ready to go for less than $1000. The fascinating thing about them for most people is how interconnected everything is. After you rebuild a few of them the facination tends to dissappear.

    Can't help it if you don't have a sense of humor...


    Sorry, but you would not believe how many times I've heard every permutation of 'screw machine'

    Leave a comment:


  • DBW
    replied
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by slayer666:
    Does anyone know what the smallest screw machine ever commercially manufactured is? Pics?[/Q

    Screw machines are dead as a dodo. NCR had one of the largest B&S shops in the world with over 100 machines. Actioned them all off and went to solid state designed office machines.
    Why not put steppers and cnc control on your
    lathe and play with something new and learn
    G code.




    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Iowolf, go easy on the guy. Multi-Spindles seperates the Men from the Boys in about 1 hour. Either you got it or you will walk out, totally intimidated with your tail between your legs. If you do not get massively injured within 2 yrs. , it's one of the most enjoyable experiences; sometimes better than SEX when you set-up and watch them run, sometimes for 2 days holding tight tolerances if you grind your tooling correct. Sometimes; it's better than *****! Relax

    ------------------
    BFH

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by slayer666:
    I guess part of the reason I want one is that I'm just plain fascinated by them. I have been fascinated by them for quite some time. I don't really need one, but it would be neat to have one (I'm willing to bet you guys think that sounds retarded). Where can I get a copy of that B&S book on cam making? Did they publish any other books on screw machining? Where can I buy a copy of these books?</font>
    Yea ,you can be fascinated with them till you have to work on one,Oh and you better invest in Oil dry stock.
    IMHO



    ------------------
    The tame Wolf !

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Proud to see a young guy interested in the complexities of screw machining. I was 18 when I fell in love with screws. Nothing like it! Complicated and relaxing at the same time. You will learn so much on the Multi-Spindles you will never have to ask any questions such as ----tool height, RPM,pressure, speed and feeds, cam configuration , drill and tap size and ALL tolerances and fits! Get in a good screw machine shop and you will live and breathe it. Everything else will come easy, since some tooling has to be hand ground and stoned. If you get the chance; set up and run Guildemeisters; 6-8 spindles.

    ------------------
    BFH

    Leave a comment:


  • slayer666
    replied
    tattoomike68,

    Would it be possible to later convert a lathe like the one you showed to operate similar to an automatic? Do you know of anyone who has done this?

    Leave a comment:


  • ARFF79
    replied
    WARNING: Long Post

    The difference between a Model OO,O,& 2, and a Model OOG, OG,& 2G depends upon the year of manufacure. The "G" stands for ground drive, and was used to identify if the machine was a line drive or motor driven for those made prior to 1945. In the mid to late 1950's, after a redesign, they returned to the OO,O,& 2 designations dropping the "G". These machines are known as Square Base or Push-Button machines. In the 1960's they were again reworked into what are known as the Ultramatic Machines. These bring the most money as they are the newest machines with more bells and whistles, ansd greater spindle capacity.

    I have a small pre-war line drive OO that was driven by an overhead motor unit called a Lima Drive. It weighs less than 1000 pound and takes up an area of about 4x3 feet including the drive off of the back. Since you need to access all areas around the machine for daily maint. and to do set ups, you need to allow for the space your body takes up as well, so figure on 6x 6 to be safe. The spindle capacity of this machine is 3/8" round max. An OOG would be 1/2" round max. You could concievably use it for bar stock without the bar feed by using 2 foot long pieces, but that would defeat the purpose of the machine. The size parts that a machine of this size runs would cycle too fast to be worth it. You would always be stopped to replace the stock. For example. I had a job for some spacers made out of 1/4" pipe. I would go through a 10' stick every 5 minutes. It was a simple push/stop-part opperation and made a part every 3 seconds. If you set it up for a magazine fed chucking job though you would not need the bar feed, but you would need a special feed for the rear cross slide and a source of parts needing a second opperation for it to be worth the tooling.

    They made a click-chunk sound as they index the turret and opperate the collet chuck. The stock rattles in the bar feed and in the feed tube. They throw cutting oil(preferably the pipe threading type and not the water based soup) around and it smokes from the cutting action (this is why newer machines are enclosed). Turret tooling can be had at bargin prices on eBay, collets and feed fingers are a bit more pricey. The real cost is in buying or making the cams. Until you have a very large collection of them, you are going to have to make a set for each job you run. After you have enough, you can find a set that is close enough to the part that they can be made to work.

    If you want to get into production type work, look for a hand screw machine such as the one pictured earlier,or trye to find a bed turret for your bench lathe. It will keep your folks happy that way.

    Leave a comment:


  • gmatov
    replied
    Look here, if you simply want ANY screw machine to begin with.

    http://www.astratool.com/machines/ph4232.htm

    http://www.astratool.com/machines/m3105.htm

    http://www.astratool.com/machines/ph2359.htm

    Cheers,

    George

    Google: Used lathes

    Leave a comment:


  • slayer666
    replied
    Is it one of these books: http://hillsgun.com/shopping/brownsharpe.htm

    [This message has been edited by slayer666 (edited 03-02-2006).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Joel
    replied
    Not exceedingly practical maybe, but not retarded.
    They are neat machines, but fulfilling a need and staying within the limits of available space and budget has dictated the contents of my shop.

    Have you tried to use Google to find the book?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X