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New toy - older than me, but it sure is shiney

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  • New toy - older than me, but it sure is shiney


    I've gone and done it again. I came into a little extra money over the holidays (I was a good boy this year) and got myself a new gadget. I've pretty much figured it out, and I'm working on getting it running. See here:

    My gear cutting machine.

    As the page says, I can pretty much figure out how the thing works by powering one pulley at a time, but to really get a picture, I have to power them simultaniously.

    I'll have this thing running one way or another, but I'm posting here as a means of putting out feelers for more info on the machine. I'd love to be able to see another one making parts, but I don't know how likely that is. Anyway, if any of you out there know stuff about this thing, please let me know. In the mean time, I'll be working on the drive system. Thanks, fellas.

    -Mark
    The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

  • #2
    Cool find, i would have bought it also...Bob

    ------------------
    Bob Wright
    Salem, Oh Birthplace of The Silver & Deming Drill
    Bob Wright
    Salem, Oh Birthplace of The Silver & Deming Drill

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    • #3
      .

      [This message has been edited by BillH (edited 12-29-2005).]

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      • #4
        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by aametalmaster:
        Cool find, i would have bought it also...Bob

        </font>

        Heh, heh. You may yet get your chance. I'm treating it, so far, as a cool little project. I figure that, if I do it smart (but tire of it), I can sell it for my cost (less time) once it's running and making parts. I suppose it could be used to make small parts for the RC model crowd if I want to try to get it to pay for itself, but that's for later.

        More interesting was the place I picked it up from. Guy's got a Hardinge HLV-H lathe in beautiful condition and he seems to be using it mostly as a horizontal surface for collecting junk. Next to it is a well-outfitted Deckel FP-1 mill in nice condition. It's wired for 220v, and it works, but it too is just another table for clutter. He's got a warehouse full of interesting stuff. Took me a while to calm down after I got out of there...


        Ah, but one thing at a time. I've got my Winter project for now...

        The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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        • #5
          Would it be naughty to ask what you paid for it. Go on make us all really sick.

          Phil

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          • #6
            Care to share with the rest of us where this treasure trove is located?? (Whine!)

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            • #7

              It's an eBay seller called equip4less, but I don't see anything listed by them right now. I was told that their primary business was "B to B", and they don't normally deal with little folks like me. For whatever reason, they decided to list this machine on eBay. I was able to determine that they have sold one or two others in the same condition, and I understand that they have 6-8 more. They got them in crates with 2 machines in each. They cut the crate in half, make sure the components are evenly distributed, and put plywood sheets on the cut halves to make 2 crates.

              The guy also said that if they ever had a sale at that location, it would be when they decided to close the doors. Most of what I saw was lab-type equipment, although as I said, I saw the Deckel, the Hardinge, and some other machine stuff. There were also a couple of Deckel pantograph machines, and an Atlas tabletop horizontal mill just like the one I have at home (vintage 1940, good condition), and a fair bit of electronic test equipment. I'm going to be watching this seller for more goodies, though - you can count on that. They're in Lorton, Va, about 30 or so minutes south of D.C.

              The guy had to basically run me off after the sale, though. I kept pointing at stuff and asking about it. I believe I was starting to make a nuisance of myself...

              The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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              • #8
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by phil burman:
                Would it be naughty to ask what you paid for it. Go on make us all really sick.

                Phil
                </font>

                About $1500. Not particularly a bargain, I guess, but it might be when compared to the original sale price, adjusted for inflation.
                The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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                • #9
                  Well based on the two or three gear quotes I've gotten in the past, it could pay for itself after a half dozen gears.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BillH:
                    Geez, I would of bought it alone for the fact it was ww2 and packed in grease and never used.</font>

                    ww2? 1956?

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                    • #11
                      Verrry Cool! I would have bought it just to figure out how it all worked.
                      Duke Reno / Yankee Metallic Metalcraft

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                      • #12
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by sauer38h:

                        ww2? 1956?
                        </font>
                        Uhmm I was testing to see if anyone actually reads my posts. Thank you Sauer.
                        I know ww2 ended in 1945 with surrender of the japs.
                        You know, I could of sworn I read somewhere on that page those were from ww2, and I totally skipped over the 1956 part.


                        [This message has been edited by BillH (edited 12-29-2005).]

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                        • #13
                          I'm sure JAPS surrendered in 1945!

                          ------------------
                          Dave da Slave

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                          • #14
                            Ahh, well I did drink some whine earlier.

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                            • #15
                              Well, considering that the thing was only built in 1956, and it predates such modern conveniences as CAD, it could very well have been designed as WWII production. I'm no weapons buff, so I don't know when bomb fuses stopped using mechanical parts.

                              But it is cool. I can't wait to get all the pulleys running together so I can see how all the adjustments affect operation. Stay tuned for more...

                              The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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