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  • How the Heck Do I Do This?

    Okay, in my shop class, I can pick some of the projects I want to do. I decided to build a model of the Apollo Lunar Lander, since it looked like it be a quickie based on the plans I'd found. Everything went fine until I got to making the cabin. I looked at it, couldn't figure out how to cut the window sections and I showed the plans to my instructor and he's not sure of how to do it. So I'm turning to the great minds here for help. It's part number 12 on the plans here: http://vesuvius.jsc.nasa.gov/er/seh/LMmodel.html

    And if I can ever get the silly image to load, you can see another view of the lander here: http://www.angelfire.com/space/hospital/

    Any suggestions?

  • #2
    Tuckerfan:
    I think there are 2 missing lines on the fab drawing of item 12. Look at the mock up of the model and you can see a sloped surface below the bottom of the windows. If there were 2 solid lines on the fab drawing of the part going horizontally from the right and left sides in about the middle of the part it would make sense because from the inside of the lander you would want to be able to look down at the base of the lander. With this surface cut away you would be able to look out the two triangular windows and look down to the lunar surface near the base of the lander.

    ------------------
    Dick
    Dick

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    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Dick Payne:
      Tuckerfan:
      I think there are 2 missing lines on the fab drawing of item 12. Look at the mock up of the model and you can see a sloped surface below the bottom of the windows. If there were 2 solid lines on the fab drawing of the part going horizontally from the right and left sides in about the middle of the part it would make sense because from the inside of the lander you would want to be able to look down at the base of the lander. With this surface cut away you would be able to look out the two triangular windows and look down to the lunar surface near the base of the lander.

      </font>
      You're right about that. I realized that as I soon as I pulled the pic up when I got home (all I'd printed out were the plans, I didn't bother to print out the picture since I didn't figure it'd come out too clear), but I'm still unsure of the best way to cut that (other than on a milling machine, of course ).

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      • #4
        I used to work in a model shop, and these weird angled glass things were real popular in the shopping malls at the time. At 1:16 or 1:8 scale, it was a challenge with skinny acetate or plexiglass. We would first make up the shape out of blocks that were double-sided taped together. EAch facet is a block. When the shape was right, the wood pieces were disassembled. A piece of the plastic would be stuck to each face, and the angles filed using the edges of each block as a guide. Glass removed, blocks assembled again, then a thicker tape used to refit the glass, staying away from the corners and joints. This would stand the glass off the wood a little. Then the plastic could be welded together. One errant drop of welding stuff and you had to start all over. Once you get one made up, you can get a feel for what needs adjusted and work the angles again. The second or third attempt should look like the target, and fit the hole it is supposed to cover. I don't know what the model looks like, but this type of glass is a real challenge.
        I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

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        • #5
          Well, my instructor and I tried putting a piece of scrap in the dividing head on the mill and eyeballing it, with no luck. What we came up with was no where near what the part's supposed to look like. Anybody have any ideas, other than what's been given so far?

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          • #6
            Tuckerfan:
            From the front, the top was straight, and the glass was angled down and back to allow the astronuts to look down towards the ladder area and off to the sides. Maybe Lockheed could help you out with some real drawing or photos - they built them.

            Revell had a really good models of it, a 1-1/2" inch high (in a book set with the command module), 3-6" high in the 74" rocket model, and about a 10" individual model. Used to have them, I am sure they are landfill somewhere now - disappeared during a move.

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            • #7
              Hmm, if Thrud doesn't have an easy answer as to how to do this, I don't feel so bad. I don't know if Revell is still making the models or not. Have to check and see. Oh, and it was Grumman that built the lander. I think Rockwell made the engines.

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              • #8
                TuckerFan: Just guessing, but I doubt if your plans (unless they provide a sepearte drawing) show any of the lines (EDGES)in true length. It is easy to derive the true lengths (even of curved surfaces) if you have two veiws or more, with the angle between veiws known.

                Its not complicated, but not easy to explain in text. A good old book on basic "descriptive geometerty" or Some OLD codger of an engineer or surveyor or a good math teacher (maybe) can determine the true line lengths and even angles between the line. with lines of true length, the surafce should be easy to lay out, and if you can draw it, you can make it- so I say here .

                ANyone have a copy of the old poem about the engineer/draftsman who is designing a part, his first sucess (on the drafting talbe) was when he got the part so you could not make it on mill not lathe, then more joy, you cold not make it from weldments, then ultimate success!!!!! you could not cast it. I think i worked with the guy who was the basis for the saga, might have been couple of other guys who were likely canidates too. Wish I knew its name or had a copy.

                Steve

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                • #9
                  Tuckerfan:
                  If you get a picture that is not buggered you will have no problem with making them. I just do not remember the angles exactly - last time I looked at them was 1973. Piece of cheese cake.

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                  • #10
                    Well, the only clear picture I've managed to find so far, shows the shape of the windows as being a 45 degree triangle. I can't find any other clear pictures which give a clear enough view to tell how the windows are angled in the lander, nor the angle of the sloped front. Somehow, I've just got to learn that when the directions say "easy to build" they probably don't mean it.

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                    • #11
                      Tuckerfan: Today, I went flea marketing, saw a model of a 48 tucker, in a nice cardboard box, $15.00. Thought of yu when I saw it. Had a door on left front fneder to the rear. surely it was not for gas? I asked who made the model, but forgot the maker.
                      Still a pretty car!
                      Steve

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                      • #12
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by docsteve66:
                        Tuckerfan: Today, I went flea marketing, saw a model of a 48 tucker, in a nice cardboard box, $15.00. Thought of yu when I saw it. Had a door on left front fneder to the rear. surely it was not for gas? I asked who made the model, but forgot the maker.
                        Still a pretty car!
                        Steve
                        </font>
                        doc, I've got a couple of those models myself. One to play with, one to leave in the cardboard box. Lots of folks have made 'em, so it's hard to say which one it might have been. I've got the Road Legends models and paid more than $15 for mine. The door on the front fender is the fuel door. The Tucker being a rear engined car, needed the tank in the front to help with the weight balance. The original prototype, however, had a rear mounted fuel tank, with the gas cap being located behind the air inlets on the rear fender. Thanks for thinking of me!

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                        • #13
                          Road legends was the name. the box was in excellent shape. I am no collector, but if it is worth a lot more than 15.00 to you (shipping would add to cost), be glad to look again. Man saiid he came every week

                          Lemma know
                          Steve

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for the offer, doc, but I've got enough stuff taking up space now. The average price for one of those models is around $30, so $15's a good deal. Now, if you can find me a real Tucker at that price....

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                            • #15
                              Tuckerfan:
                              A 45*-45*-90 Triangle sounds right for the window. It was angled back at the bottom so as to have a better view of the ladder and landing gear. The area below the window sloped awayto allow a better view. I am not 100% sure now, but the outside 45* corner may have been angled back as well.

                              The thought occurs to me that if you contact the Smithonian they should be able to tell you for sure.

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