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  • alterations

    I have been thinking of making a few, ahem, alterations to a particular lathe. it doesnt need to be strong or (gasp) super accurate but it does need to have a bore and chuck that I can run .25-2" tubing through, the delema right now is that chucks I have seen that have clearances like that are a serious case of overkill, like hunting gophers with 000 buck I was thinking ( yes I know, Ive been warned) about annealing a "junk" chuck, boring and then mounting on an appropriate back plate. any better Ideas?

    thanks
    Samuel

  • #2
    Most chucks are cast iron or semi-steel, so annealing will not be necessary.
    However, the scroll pivots on a boss in the chuck, and boring to this diameter may take this boss out, so check the chuck dimensions before purchase.
    Take a real good at the lathe spindle also, 2+" is pretty big, and there may not be too much meat left in the area of bearings. Also consider that you have destroyed any resale value. You may want to keep the original spindle and turn a new one for this purpose.
    Jim H.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply, I am basicly starting with a bare bed, so I will be making the tailstock and headstock, also it will be opperating under low/no load, so I think a quality set of pillow blocks would work out for the bearings, I suppose I could cast babbit, and make things simply more complex....

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      • #4
        Heck yes. You don't even have to anneal to bore them. The bodies are machinable.

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        • #5
          Like Forrest says - Hell yeah.

          Ask any doofus that has accidentally bored the chuck off a spindle. while not paying attention. (not me! - I have heard many of these stories)

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          • #6
            I think one of the wheels at work is still shaking his head in disbelief about my boring out the chuck on the Clausing. Spindle bore was bigger than the chuck bore by about .060 so I bored out that well worn Pratt Burnerd to match. Didn't hurt a thing and allowed these parts to be ran, and I've ran a lot of these parts, they have been a steady job.

            Just make sure not to take to much out, look before you leap.

            Tools are meant to be used, not just admired.

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            • #7
              Why not make a collet holder?
              Bob G
              Bob Indiana

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              • #8
                I was under the impression that collets were for applications that require a little more accuracy than I need on this proj.

                also the lathe will need to have two "headstocks" that will work in syncro to eachother, ie instead of a tailstock. wich would meen two sets of collets, but I am intrested in a collet holder for me atlas

                any other ideas?

                Thank you all so much for your help, normally I do all right but this one has me up a creek.

                Samuel

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                • #9
                  Samuel:
                  Are you talking about a powered or unpowered rotating tailstock chuck?

                  Bison also makes ball bearing tailstock chucks 3 & 6 jaw - or you can make your own. Rolling your own its more difficult but not too hard.

                  I made a MT#2 arbor with a non-rotating backplate for a Bison 3-1/2" chuck mounted on it for use in my tailstock, rotaty table, and mill.

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                  • #10
                    Thrud

                    In theory, I would like to run 2" tubing through both the head stock and the tail stock, both of these being powered, sounds crazy I know, but this is what is required, and to make matters a little more complex the distance between centers needs to be able to change while the lathe is in motion.. good thing I like a challenge.

                    Respectfully,

                    Samuel

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                    • #11
                      Samuel:
                      Might be easier to buy a 6 axis CNC lathe...

                      Good luck, sounds like a nightmare looking for a place to happen! (A challenge!)

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                      • #12
                        Thrud did I mention that I will be spinning something that will be hot enough to require didimium eye-are? he he a dangerous challenge!

                        Samuel

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                        • #13
                          Samuel,

                          Just what the heck are you trying to make,if I make be so nosey?

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                          • #14

                            Hey Al,

                            the machine will be a glass lathe, used to make retorts and such for the extraction of elements/metals from concentrated deposits, although not a machining proj. in and of itself except for construction.

                            Samuel

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                            • #15
                              I be derned!!!. My best guess was some sort of friction welding pipe end to send. Way off! THanks Al, for asking
                              Steve

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