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Things others can learn from our mistakes

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  • Things others can learn from our mistakes

    Last month I was in a rant mode and posted a topic about stupid things management did. Lets put the shoe on the other foot and see if we can help others avoid some of the stupid mistakes we've all made
    Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

  • #2
    Spin Doc,
    I have been on both sides of the employment things. I learned many lessons in handling people in the Army and by studying other peoples methods. I like the Vietnamese method of management, at a given time, every body comes togther as equals. Problems are discussed and ideas are thrown out for discussion. Everybody has an equal say. The basic rule is that you can't jump up and say that he is a "Goat f***, Son of a dog", everybody has to be positive in their input.
    I enjoy a time when team leaders had authority over higher ups as well as other team members, because the team leader was the person in control, that team leader was the "expert in that situation".
    The method of contracting for work out put is a really good system, a positive reward for completing the work as control for. Their are no bad rewards, just if you don't meet the contract standards, you discuss why you couldn't meet those standards. The write a new contract.

    Good Bosses are hard to come by, good employees are just as hard to get. With the right communications and expectations, things work out for the best.

    Jerry

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    • #3
      Maybe I didn't quite express myself properly. What I meant to say really dumb things we did in the shop and how we can help others learn from what we admit to be our own lapses at the time. I didn't mean to start this as a us vs. them thing. After all we have to be able to poke fun at ourselves once in a while or we just plain don't have a sense of humor
      Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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      • #4
        Good idea. I would first like to say thanks to all of you For sharing your knowledge. I am new to machining about two years hs.Now my most rensent mishap,I was making a bushing 4"dia in my 16*60 lathe and when I parted it off it fell between the chuck jaw and bed ouch!!it went from 380rpm to 0 and froze up, Took cover off of head stock it had bent a splined shaft and broken a tooth off a gear,This is how i learned to make splines and gears. I now stick a large drill bit in the tail stock and run it inside the bushing to catch it.Was trying to catch it with a rod in hand. happy holidays to all Tom G

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        • #5
          I have been hoping that something like this would come along. Tom, thats a great idea thanks.

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          • #6
            Parting off is ALWAYS the lathe job that I dread the most, Never have been happy with the way things tend to work out when I try it: the tool chatter, the lifting of the headstock in the bearings, flexing of the compound rest, slinging cut-off pieces all over the place, etc. I would use a rear mounted tool holder but my Logan is not made to where I can install one, but I do use a drill bit or a rod in the tail stock to catch the cut off pieces. Usually, I saw off the material with a hacksaw and leave enough stock to true up in the chuck.

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            • #7
              Here's mine, not exactly machining, no one was around as witness either! My first motorcycle was in need of a tune up, and the manual said to adjust intake valves for .002" clearance (cold) and the exhaust .004". I checked through the book 15 times, stared at and cussed the engine for a couple hours, but still it did not reveal to me which side was which. I had done some auto mechanics, too, but this was a puzzler. It dawned on me, some hours later, that the CARBURETORS hung off the intake side and the EXHAUST system off the, well, exhaust side. I think I turned beet red, even without a witness to point out my stupidity. Over the years I've wankered up plenty of stuff, but this incident remains foremost in my random access memory.
              I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

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              • #8
                Welded on a forklift the other night,I work in maintinance now,alone and tired after 12 hours of work. Well after three fire extinguishers and a little,well alot,of swett all was COOL again. Moral,use the buddy system unless you can afford to buy a burn't out forklift.
                Bob
                Bob Indiana

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                • #9
                  When I was in 1st year Vo-Tech, I had to face a piece of steel to length in the lathe. I asked our instructor what was a good way to get an accurate measurement while the part was in the chuck. He told me to put a paralell between the part and the chuck body, then use a vernier depth gage to measure from the part face to the paralell. I took my measurement, pulled the clutch to start the next cut and "ping-ting-ting-bang!" When I looked to see what the noise was, I saw my friend (almost ex-friend) holding his shoulder, and my paralell was at the rear of the shop. The instructor never said anything about taking the paralell out of the chuck before starting the lathe. HONEST! I'm a lot smarter now. REALLY!

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                  • #10
                    One of the common ways to remove a tight bearing race is to weld a bead around the inside of it to shrink it. A good mechanic did the same to an engine,to pull a bad cylinder sleeve. Whoops ! this engine didn't have sleeves.

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                    • #11
                      Al, you got a 10" Logan? Me too, and I was just about ready to make a small rear slide when I got ahold of a t-slot crosslide.

                      BUT, I think you could make a small slide fairly easily and just put bolt holes in it for the rear toolpost. That's what I was going to do, and I still may.

                      If you have some scrap about 1" thick and 4x4 it ought to be do-able. You can mill that size right on the Logan to get the dovetail, since you have the cross-slide travel (just) to do it.

                      Course, if you have a mill, off you go.

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                      • #12
                        BROTHERS: I have often thought of starting a discussion similar to this only on fixing cars but seeing as how we are all in this together I will throw in this story.
                        In 1959 I rebuilt a Ford Flathead and I sent out the block to be bored oversize. It came back and I assembled it and it ran fine BUT it sounded as if there were 8 people running their fingers up and down washboards keeping time with the engine. I called on my next door neighbor to come over and listen to the sound that it was making, now mind you Dave was a B-24 mechanic in North Africa and owned a very successful repair shop so he was no dummie but he hadn't the slightest idea what it could be. Dave suggesetd that I "Pop off" one of the cylinder heads and after I did so he looked into the cylinders and started to laugh his head off. I looked into the cylinders and I didn't see anything funny at all so I asked him "Whazofunny". Between gafaws and other forms of mirth he asked me why I hadn't had the cylinders honed? Honed? Whazat? Well you can figure out what the noise was, all of those piston rings passing over all those tool bit marks sure made a funny noise. WALT

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                        • #13
                          Now this is the idea I had behind this topic. Let it go for a while and I'll let you inon some of my boobboos
                          Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                          • #14
                            Spinner: I bet I did more bobooos than you. And most of mine were expensive!
                            Steve

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                            • #15
                              you-all ever notice that you make most of your worst mistakes when you are "being careful"?

                              If I had a nickel for every time I "very carefully" did something completely wrong, I would not lack for change.

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