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  • #46
    If some thing is moving, keep hands and fingers far far away.. There's always someone who has lost a finger in a band saw or been pulled through the cogs of a motorcycle. And by all means if your snowblower jams with ice, don't try to clear it with your hand.

    Luckily, I have not fallen fate to machinery yet. I have friends and family that are willing to educate me on the perils of poor judgment.

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    • #47
      Even if it ain't moving e careful. One of my most stuid things was trying to remove a 4" piston from a 48" long cylinder by pressurizing with air. Piston stuck, rod sticking out a ways. I wondered why. Its amazing I did not look into the damn hole. Laid my hand on the cylinder, intending to feel inside i guess. Just as i touched the cylinder, the piston shot out, the air stung my finger (nothing touched me). The rod and piston went through a heavy wood wall and way across the yard before it stopped.

      Another dumb one? was moving a heavy machine.All alone. Machine just light eoungh that I could lift one side, machine against a wall when tipped to put a roller underthe thing. Had fingers under the edge. roller rolled away. there I am fingers under the edge, cant turn loose, can't lift, forehead against the side of machine, nothing within foots reach to slide under, getting tired fast. Moral is try to have a safety man at all times. And dont commit your back up man to routine work.

      Steve

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      • #48
        A real dumb one. I attempted to weld a friends gas tank when I was 16. He had a small pin hole in it and I just got the MIG welder. I drained the gas of course and rinsed the tank several times. It did not smell like gas so I thought I was good to go. One the first arc the tank expanded into a football shape and left the welding table, hit the ceiling(it was a low ceiling) and took out the lights. My buddy hit the deck, and I casually lifted my welding helmet to investigate the load noise.

        The seams on the tank held. It just expanded.

        I saw my grandfather braze a hole in a tank the year before without trouble. I must have missed a step or two. I have not attempted a tank repair since.

        ------------------

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        • #49
          JasonW, you are one lucky dude!! (As are all occupants of that house, and all surrounding neighbors.)
          I always heard the safest way to weld a fuel tank is have it FULL of fuel. Either way it's potentially a gross example of false economy.
          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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          • #50
            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by lynnl:
            JasonW, you are one lucky dude!! (As are all occupants of that house, and all surrounding neighbors.)
            I always heard the safest way to weld a fuel tank is have it FULL of fuel. Either way it's potentially a gross example of false economy.
            </font>
            Only diesel fuel tank can be welded full! As a matter of fact IHC recommends that as a means of fixing the fuel tank on my 4386 tractor. I can't say I would try that with a gasoline tank!

            Paul

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            • #51
              Yeah, I didn't clarify my point. I certainly wasn't meaning to recommend to anyone that they weld a gas tank... Full, empty, or anywhere in between. I certainly would NOT. I imagine there are safe ways, e.g. by emptying and purging the fumes with some inert gas. But I'll leave that to the experts! (hope nobody went out and blew themself up trying that!)
              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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              • #52
                I have welded several gas tanks. By the book you "press" before welding. Pressing says you fill with some thing that will not explode until there is little room left for and explosion. Still scares me as I don't do that nohow. For gasoline, I shake out all the debris, then put a vaccum cleaner hose on blow, shove it to far side of the tank and let it blow at least overnight. THen use aheat gun to heat the seams and sniff. if it smelled of gas (i think the rust etc absorbs gasoline) it would get blown overnight again. Never had to blow a second time. Never had even a "poof". In no way do I reccommend welding a gas tank, but "PO Folks use po ways" .
                Steve

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                • #53
                  A temporary worker decided while he was alone in the shop sweeping,to make some trash cans out of empty barrels. He cut into the second one with the cutting torch with the barrel lying on it's side. The ends blew out,four of seven overhead doors and all the windows in the building blew out or were smashed.Never scratched the guy.He doesn't work there anymore.

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                  • #54
                    I have use an arc welder to cut a hole in an old gas tank. It was a 300 gal tank, with a leak in it. It sat empty for over a year, but still smelled of gas. I took the CO2 bottle from the mig welder and purged the air from the tank. It cut just fine, not that I would tell anyone it is safe. Just that it worked for me once.

                    I didn't like the idea of using the Ox/Ac torch.

                    Paul

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                    • #55
                      On vacation in '69, had holed a tank on 66 dodge coronet. Blacksmith shop/whatever in Silverton Colo. fixed it. They first drained and flushed tank for about an hour with water. Then enlarged the hole, cleaned the metal with a wire brush/acid and put a moly bolt with a large washer on outside. They then used the largest lead soldering IRON, not a gun, but a hot iron only to solder the washer and tank. Never leaked.

                      Guess what?? They did it OUTSIDE rather than in the shop!!! Wonder why outside?? Hehehe.

                      Must have been wise ole farts!!!

                      [This message has been edited by Crazy Ed (edited 01-05-2003).]

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                      • #56
                        Gunbuilder: what you did was "pressing". thats what the books say do. you "gas pressed", others water press, other a combination gas / liquid.

                        This fear of flames around gasoline (I have it also) is, in my rational mind, a product of our education, not experience. Last summer, Son in law was clearing his land of trees, ran into a hornets nest (on tree already on ground. Grabbed some gas threw it on nest. I was yelling no when he threw a match, the ground had a sheet of blue flame way beyond him, made a "whoof" sound. andthen the falmes were back to the nest. It was a hot day, i think vapor ran through the grass, and ignited from his match. other than being scared, he was unharmed. I offered to investigate more if he was in the mood- do it safer though. He was adamant that he knew nuff not to do again andthat he figured me for a fool (he was much nicer but stiil firm). But rational mind or not, my hands just won't let me do sometings I know are "safe". Matter of a lifetime of education.

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                        • #57
                          Hey, we used to regularly oxy~acetylene weld car and bike fuel tanks by purging the tank with exhaust fumes from an idling car! Rig up a flex pipe onto the tailpipe of a car run the engine for about a half hour (this will dry out the tank and ensure all oxygen is displaced), continue to run the car engine while you weld away. Sorta EGR welding!!

                          Fact is gasoline will only ignite within a close AFR (air to fuel ratio) no ignition below about 9:1, and none above about 17:1. many years ago I was taught, on induction day into a car factory, that gasoline was only the third most flammable substance on the factory site. #1 was trim glue (high aromatics), #2 was grease exposed to pure Oxygen, #3 was gasoline and #4 was anti freeze (glycol)

                          RR

                          [This message has been edited by Ragarsed Raglan (edited 01-06-2003).]

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                          • #58
                            RR
                            The exhaust gas trick is old trick. I had forgotten, every old time repair place ised it (and gas tanks used to hole out a lot more than now). Thanks for the reminder and memory. I quote Oscar and this bunch making us remember it all . .

                            According to the RV guys, more rvs burn to ground because of the antifreeze than gasoline. You get a small pin hole some where where the coolants can evapoarte the water and leave the antifreeze, then under a long heavy load (climbing a pass out west) the Glycol burns and you are siting beside the road wondering what happend. EPA will probably ban it when all the manufacuters find a replacement and are ready to sell. Like freon
                            Steve

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                            • #59
                              I now only solder gas tanks with a solder iron and it seems to hold well, but there was a time when I had to weld a motorcycle gas tank. Nobody to ask, so I took TIDE soap and very hot water and filled the tank and shook, shook, shook. Emptied it and did it again. Put the empty tank on the other side of a concrete block wall and reached around the corner with a torch in one hand, shook a little more, dipped it into the filler hole and waited. Nothing happened, so I welded. Haven't tried it since.

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