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OT, Auto: How To Clean Dealer Sticker Adhesive From Window

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  • #16
    I use brake clean for allot of stuff like that - I would not use if it has applied tint and you can tell at the edge of the window - they always stop short of running the tint full length or it would peel as the window goes up and down,,,

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    • #17
      Let them take it off.

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      • #18
        3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner never let me down. It's a way more effective concoction that any of the single solvents mentioned above.
        3M Adhesive Remover should work too.
        Last edited by MichaelP; 10-20-2019, 08:09 PM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by polaraligned View Post
          Let them take it off.
          No kidding. That should have been removed before it left the lot.
          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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          • #20
            A product called WipeAway works for price stickers and such. Just put a little of it on an absorbent cloth and scrub the goo with that. It takes a little longer, but there's less chance of getting it on paint that way. WipeAway seems a bit less aggressive than GooGone.
            Jim

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            • #21
              Citrol is the best citrus based stuff I've ever used,it is used extensively in Oil patch.

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              • #22
                I am really late. WD40. JR
                My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                • #23
                  How about a sharp blade cook top scraper. It will not harm the glass.
                  Helder Ferreira
                  Setubal, Portugal

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                  • #24
                    Thanks for all the responses. The dealer did offer to remove it so I am going to try that first. My real quandary here is weather or not there is a film type tint on the window. If I knew for sure that it was just glass, then I would have broken out my scraper in a flash.

                    Again, thanks to all.
                    Paul A.

                    Make it fit.
                    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                    • #25
                      I've always used lacquer thinner. It cuts everything and doesn't smear the adhesive around.
                      Just don't get it on any plastic surfaces.

                      JL.............

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                        I've always used lacquer thinner. It cuts everything and doesn't smear the adhesive around.
                        Just don't get it on any plastic surfaces.

                        JL.............
                        Oh, yeah - lacquer thinner works. It's VERY aggressive. I usually try acetone first, it's a much less vicious solvent and it's pretty safe to work with.

                        BTW, lacquer thinner will blast right through your skin, carrying whatever else is on your hands with it, into your bloodstream. You can taste it a few minutes after handling it.

                        Wear gloves.

                        -js

                        There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                        Location: SF Bay Area

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post

                          Oh, yeah - lacquer thinner works. It's VERY aggressive. I usually try acetone first, it's a much less vicious solvent and it's pretty safe to work with.

                          BTW, lacquer thinner will blast right through your skin, carrying whatever else is on your hands with it, into your bloodstream. You can taste it a few minutes after handling it.

                          Wear gloves.

                          -js
                          I've use thinner for a lot of stuff for many years. I've had my hands and it for years to. Never tasted any of it ! Or noticed any strange taste from handling it. It does suck the oil out of your skin real fast and stings pretty good if you have an open cut. I could never find any gloves that would hold up to it.

                          JL......

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post

                            Oh, yeah - lacquer thinner works. It's VERY aggressive. I usually try acetone first, it's a much less vicious solvent and it's pretty safe to work with.

                            BTW, lacquer thinner will blast right through your skin, carrying whatever else is on your hands with it, into your bloodstream. You can taste it a few minutes after handling it.

                            Wear gloves.

                            -js
                            Wearing nitrile gloves is a VERY good idea for just that reason. In fact milder solvents can also get through out skin too so I make it a point to use gloves even with less aggressive solvents.

                            As I understand it lacquer thinner is a soup of solvents. And generally a major part of the generic hardware store lacquer thinner is acetone with a supporting role from a few other solvents added to the bulk acetone. So I'm always very careful with lacquer thinner around any sort of plastics or painted items.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by JoeLee View Post

                              I've use thinner for a lot of stuff for many years. I've had my hands and it for years to. Never tasted any of it ! Or noticed any strange taste from handling it. It does suck the oil out of your skin real fast and stings pretty good if you have an open cut. I could never find any gloves that would hold up to it.

                              JL......
                              Once it lifts out the skin oil and skin fats and leaves your skin whitish like that there's a pretty easy road into your blood in the capillaries. And if we do this frequently enough it can lead to solvent related eczema which isn't very nice either.

                              I can't say I got a taste in the back of my throat either. But as much as possible when using even small amounts of any of the better degreasing solvents I use nitrile gloves. They may not last very well but I'd rather change out the cheap disposable gloves a couple of times for a bigger job than to let the solvent do similar damage to my skin and through my blood stream to my internal organs. A lot of those effects are accumulative too. So it may not seem like they are doing any harm but some day along the way it may be a contributing factor to some other condition that we'd rather avoid. And the cost of a few boxes of nitrile gloves is a small price to pay to possibly avoid such a medical issue that ruins our later lives.

                              At least that's my thoughts on it....

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                              • #30
                                I've tried all kinds of gloves. The problems I've encountered are with nitrile gloves is you can't handle small parts very well and the gloves swell and make it worse.
                                Latex gloves don't hold out much better. They become very slippery and you can't hold on to anything. Then they swell and tear.
                                So sometimes I just have to get my fingers wet to get the job done. Then I wash my hands off with soap.



                                JL.................

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