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Bench Mounted hand tapper, any experience?

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  • Bench Mounted hand tapper, any experience?

    Got a job where I’ll have to tap several hundred holes 6-48, some through and some blind. Looking at possibly getting a hand tapper, anybody here use one?
    Round stock, 12L14

    Thanks

    Mike
    Mike Hunter

    www.mikehunterrestorations.com

  • #2
    By a " Hand tapper " do you mean something that you turn by hand or something that you feed by hand? Having several hundred to do I would use a tapping head in a drill press. I use the Tapmatic 3R and have tapped thousands of holes with it. A good investment

    With round stock keeping the hole aligned could be a problem that may require a fixture.

    Rick

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    • #3
      I have one of these
      https://www.micromark.com/MicroLux-Tapping-Fixture_2
      works good up to 1/4”
      Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
      Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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      • #4
        A tapping head in a drill press is the only way to do hundreds. You can set the depth stop on the quill so the tap goes the same depth for holes that are all the same, blind or through hole. It's one of the old school things that is still almost like magic. You can control the speed of the tap, forward, reverse, stop, etc., all with the quill feed handle.

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        • #5
          I recently bought one of those bench tappers at an auction, it works well, but for a lot of holes a tapping head in the drill press or mill is still best.

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          • #6
            I'd say a tapping head too. But if this is a once off sort of job a tapping head is a fairly pricey tool to buy. At that point I'd buy or make a hand tapper similar to that MicroMark.

            Or....... if you are holding the parts to drill them on your drill press perhaps make a tapping arm that fits onto the column and set up the arm and drilling such that you can just swing the vise or clamping block holding the part over and do the tapping' right on the drill press. That way the hole and tap are aligned neatly. For 6-48 threading you want a more sensitive feel so I would not use a cross bar. Instead flute or knurl a roughly 1 to 1 1/4" handle and turn it sort of like a screwdriver for a better feel of the tap's resistance. Or make a wood handle which would not need any flutes or gripiness added to it.

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            • #7
              Turret lathe, nothing short of a NC lathe with rigid tapping will beat it. You could easily drill, chamfer and tap 100 parts per hour at that size and in that material.

              Small turret lathes are awesome for this kind of work.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bented View Post
                Turret lathe, nothing short of a NC lathe with rigid tapping will beat it. You could easily drill, chamfer and tap 100 parts per hour at that size and in that material.

                Small turret lathes are awesome for this kind of work.
                I won't argue with that on the face of it.... But if the OP has to rush out and buy something to do this one time job I'd suggest that buying and somewhat restoring an old turret lathe or buying a spanking new CNC machining center seems a touch over the top for a few hundred tapped holes.... or did I miss the amusing tongue in cheek sarcasm intended in your post?

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                • #9
                  Never pass up the opportunity to buy more tools. This is absolutely a perfect time to buy a tapping arm.....You don't need anymore justification to order one. Do it today.
                  How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                  • #10
                    Hand tapper is a non-starter for paying job with that many holes IMHO. The first thing I'd do is get a good tap and put it in a cordless drill and see what luck you have. Next would be tapping head in a drill press/mill.

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                    • #11
                      Assuming you mean one of these?
                      https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...ProductID=2539

                      I have one and I have done a hundred or so holes at a time with one, but it's kinda big for a #6 thread even though it comes with a #6 tap holder.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        Gentlemen,

                        This is wat I'll be makinghttps://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/1334220

                        .So recommendations on a tapping head? One hole is a blind hole
                        Last edited by Mike Hunter; 10-22-2019, 10:20 AM.
                        Mike Hunter

                        www.mikehunterrestorations.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have one like wierdscience showed and it has been a good tool. I also had one like it at work that I used all the time before I retired. As was said, a no. 6 is getting small for it but with care it will do small threads like that, you just need to keep in mind what you are doing. I use "gun taps" or spiral fluted to eliminate having to back up to clear chips. Also plenty of a think enough cutting fluid to stay on the tap.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                            I won't argue with that on the face of it.... But if the OP has to rush out and buy something to do this one time job I'd suggest that buying and somewhat restoring an old turret lathe or buying a spanking new CNC machining center seems a touch over the top for a few hundred tapped holes.... or did I miss the amusing tongue in cheek sarcasm intended in your post?
                            Tongue in Cheek, merely pointing out that some old school machines still work well in certain applications, turret lathes are great little machines and can be had very cheaply.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you want to tap a large number of holes quickly, then this is what is needed. The one in the advert is 1/3 the price of industry rated ones.
                              https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vertical-...cAAOSwBqVdjwFC
                              You could recover a good proportion of the outlay by selling it afterwards.
                              Last edited by old mart; 10-22-2019, 02:01 PM.

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