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  • What is it?

    Yard sale item. Any idea what this is for? Has a replaceable cutter.



    Last edited by junkaddict; 10-24-2019, 03:18 AM.

  • #2
    Almost looks like a wire sizing die.
    The flux capacitors on the input shaft are throwing me off a bit though.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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    • #3
      It's not a replaceable cutter, that's a hardened drill bushing. It's a fixture for drilling nuts and bolt heads for safety wire. The two-piece sliding fixed jaw lets you adjust for the size of the nut and the placement of the hole on the nut, different sized drill bushings for different sized drills, and the big knob in the back adjusts the stop for regulating how high on the bolt head or nut the hole is drilled.

      Actually a pretty nicely made piece. If it's shopmade, somebody spent some time on it.

      Doc.
      Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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      • #4
        I figured someone would know what it is. It seems obvious now that you said it. Its even got some kind of oxide coating on it. Like you said, if it is shop made, someone went the extra mile on it.
        Last edited by junkaddict; 10-24-2019, 12:36 PM.

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        • #5
          The slots seen on that sliding, lower part of the vee jaw kind of suggest that part was repurposed and adapted for its present use.

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          • #6
            The slot on the lower jaw is for drill clearance, once it breaks through the nut or bolt head.

            Doc.
            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lynnl View Post
              The slots seen on that sliding, lower part of the vee jaw kind of suggest that part was repurposed and adapted for its present use.
              That slot seems like it's to open the "V" to move the hole further away from the edge. If you do this, then you change the center height of the hex tip hence the other slot to move the whole piece to allow re-centering of the fixture.
              Helder Ferreira
              Setubal, Portugal

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                The slot on the lower jaw is for drill clearance, once it breaks through the nut or bolt head..

                Doc.
                OK, yeah, I can see now how that would be needed when that lower jaw is moved up for smaller bolts/nuts.

                I was misunderstanding the drill path. I thought it angled down through that little hole up near the apex of the upper jaw, which I now see has a screw in it , rather than a through-hole.

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                • #9
                  It looks like it is for drilling lock wire holes through the corner of a hex nut or bolt.

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                  • #10
                    Those wire locking hole drilling fixtures need to be made heavy duty as thousands of nuts and bolts will be drilled on them, some in all six positions. My firm used to make a lot of aircraft special fasteners on the cnc mills and lathes, but most of the wire locking holes were done by our driller using similar fixtures. Because of the angle of attack, it was probably not economically viable to do them on an automatic machine. The hardened drill bush with the end bevelled to fit against the nut or bolt is essential, and can be quickly replaced when the bore starts to wear.

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                    • #11
                      Good one Doc... makes complete sense - wow what people used to have to do to make a fastener before CNC automation stuff...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Illinoyance View Post
                        It looks like it is for drilling lock wire holes through the corner of a hex nut or bolt.
                        Looks like for drilling lock wire holes to me as well.

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                        • #13
                          Try asking a guy with a cnc mill or lathe whether they would like to drill large quantities of small holes in steel at an angle of 30 degrees and see what they say.
                          Last edited by old mart; 10-27-2019, 04:46 PM. Reason: maths muddle

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                          • #14
                            This is a Reglus Drill Jig I bought from the late JC Hannum that was a member here,pic shows drilling wire holes in bolts.

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