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An unexpected resin printer issue

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  • An unexpected resin printer issue

    Awhile back I bought a 3d Resin printer, but have yet to really get up and play around with it. A neighbor about four blocks down from me also has one, same model in fact, and has had issues with the train rolling through town.

    Since he and I are both the same distance from the RR tracks and since both my house and shop rock and roll when the train passes, I'm thinking I'll have the same problem. His prints will come out with some faint ridges in them if the printer is running while a train passes by and the print is being exposed. Since I bought a resin printer to specifically avoid a boatload of hand finishing, it would be nice to find a way around this. I have tried asking the RR if they could provide me with a schedule, but since I'm not a commercial concern they pretty much told me to FO.

    As a last resort I could bring the thing to work and set it up there, the shop floor and building are a sizable mass and don't shake ,however it wouldn't be the most convenient setup.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    Heavy concrete block sitting on springs? Worked in an old Nike nuclear missile site and all the equipment in the building was mounted on thick concrete blocks supported on springs.

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    • #3
      Or, just lay a board on a square of 2" thick foam rubber and set the printer on the board. If too much vibration gets through, cut the foam back to just pillars in the four corners.

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      • #4
        Hang it from the ceiling on simple bungee cords. They don't weigh much, and it's cheap and easy enough to try.

        Reminds me of a story I read years ago in a trade mag or somewhere about a stamping press at one end of the building wrecking finish cuts on a machine at the other end.

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        • #5
          I would think that a solid and somewhat heavy base would be a good start. Mount that on springs and encase it in a framework, then use pieces of a memory foam mattress as dampers.

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          • #6
            Put it on a piece of board on top of a half inflated large inner tube. DIY float table it's what I've used for long exposure fluorescent microscopy.

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            • #7
              The macro photography people have struggled with this problem for a long time The first issue is figuring out the frequency of the vibrations you need to cancel. A cellphone vibration may or may not be sensitive enough.

              Sorbothane feet can make a big difference.
              Large mass base of concrete, granite, sand, or sand blasting media (it's heavier than beach sand).
              Suspend the unit from the ceiling on bungee cords.
              Semi-inflated inner tube (as mattthemuppet mentioned).
              Set the unit on coils of cable (coils are vertical).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                Hang it from the ceiling on simple bungee cords. They don't weigh much, and it's cheap and easy enough to try.

                Reminds me of a story I read years ago in a trade mag or somewhere about a stamping press at one end of the building wrecking finish cuts on a machine at the other end.
                Yes, happened to us. Had a big stamping machine blanking out 24" discs in 1/4" stainless for barrel ends. At the other end of the shop, about 100 yards away was a roll grinder for truing up the rolls of the finishing mill. It had to have an independent concrete base in a pit of its own, isolated from the rest of the floor to avoid ripples when the stamp was working.
                'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                  Put it on a piece of board on top of a half inflated large inner tube. DIY float table it's what I've used for long exposure fluorescent microscopy.
                  I think we have a winner!
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

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                  • #10
                    I tried using a semi-inflated innertube with my desktop macro photo setup. It's mounted on a 12"x18"x3" surface plate. It was pretty unstable. You may have resin sloshing around a lot. Fortunately, it's cheap to try.

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                    • #11
                      Install a semaphore and have the trains stopped till you're done with printing.
                      Mike
                      WI/IL border, USA

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by elf View Post
                        I tried using a semi-inflated innertube with my desktop macro photo setup. It's mounted on a 12"x18"x3" surface plate. It was pretty unstable. You may have resin sloshing around a lot. Fortunately, it's cheap to try.
                        It should work given the frequency is pretty low. I also thought about two lapped plates in a tub with a small pump pushing oil between the plates from the center. I remember reading about a large telescope that did that for both seismic reasons and as the thrust bearing for rotation.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          For the innertube option a big thick innertube works well, like a motorbike one. Plus you need a reasonably heavy thing on top of it, so the thing being suspended doesn't oscillate or wobble. Now I remember, when I was in Australia we had our microinjection set up on such a float table, so it's good enough to use a pulled capillary tube to inject DNA in to worms 50um in diameter

                          Weirdscience - the hydraulic approach (which is really what the innertube is) is the pro way. For really heavy stuff oil would be ideal, for lighter things air works well. Typically for high end microscopy (compound fluorescence or laser confocal) the manufacturers supply a air hydraulic float table, which is a heavy steel frame with a 3/4 or 1" thick ground steel plate suspended on 4 or 6 air pistons. Air is usually supplied from a large tank strapped to the wall (sometimes it's nitrogen gas, which is also used for microinjection). The ground steel plate is both self levelling (not v. important) and isolated from vibration transmitted through the floor. Without it you can see when people are walking by in the corridor outside or a freezer compressor kicks on nearby.

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