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Hand reamer V Chucking Reamer

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  • Hand reamer V Chucking Reamer

    I have what looks to be a reoccurring job ,press fitting a shaft in to an aluminium hub, at the moment i just drill the hole and use a boring bar to finish to nominal size (22mm) the interference fit is built into the shaft size, to speed things up i want to drill then ream the hole to size, not having a 22mm reamer i have to buy one ,my options are a hand type reamer to use in the lathe holding with a tap handle and pushing in with a dead centre in the tailstock so it sort centres its self or a chucking reamer held in a chuck in the tail stock, my question would a chucking reamer be more critical in tailstock allignment, or lastly a reamer with a 3Mt taper in the tail stock with the same alignment concerns

  • #2
    I think the MT3 reamer will have the best alignment of all, provided the tailstock has not been moved off center. If everything is lined up dead center, it should be ok. It would be critical to check that alignment before using the reamer, because the MT3 reamer won't have any "give" compared to the other choices. So, the MT3 is more critical.

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    • #3
      With a dial gauge on a mag base it isn't hard to ensure the tail stock ram is correctly aligned with the center axis of the lathe. And once you've adjusted that alignment to within a fine degree I'd say that either version of a chucking reamer would be fine.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        Hand reamers? Never heard of a hand reamer be fore.. De-burring tool at best. Want to know why> A metal machining tool and cutter needs to be Solid. :Not a one size fits ll ...
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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        • #5
          Chucking reamer as it will follow the rough hole. If the roughed hole position is off no reamer will correct it, only boring will move the hole position.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JRouche View Post
            Hand reamers? Never heard of a hand reamer be fore.. De-burring tool at best. Want to know why> A metal machining tool and cutter needs to be Solid. :Not a one size fits ll ...
            I believe hand reamers had a square end so you could turn them with a tap wrench or T handle etc. Chucking reamer shanks were round all the way to the end.
            I also believe the starting taper was longer on the hand reamer.

            JL...............
            Last edited by JoeLee; 11-09-2019, 02:23 PM.

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            • #7
              dont worry about alignment, they're flexible enough that they'll get pull onto the bore's centre and won't cut an eccentric hole (unless they're following one). Definitely go with the machine reamer though.....they have designed into it the shaft length required to give the flex to follow the hole
              .

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              • #8
                Surely in a production set up gold standard is going to be a machine reamer in a floating reamer holder in the lathe tailstock. Floating holder will allow the reamer to follow the drilled hole so tailstock alignment is less critical.
                West Sussex UK

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alan Smith View Post
                  Surely in a production set up gold standard is going to be a machine reamer in a floating reamer holder in the lathe tailstock. .
                  agreed, It is, but its a lot to build if you just want to ream a hole. Whether it matters of course it would depend on how much the tailstock is out - the shaft flex isn't going to accommodate a ridiculously high offset, but for the most part it works. Think of chucking a reamer in a DP or mill, you can often visibly see the wobble at the end of the reamer, but as it hits the pilot, it runs straight and makes perfect holes....offered in the context of the offset being a few thou not say a few hundred
                  .

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                  • #10
                    And with a dial gauge on the tool post it's pretty easy to check the tail stock alignment both for horizontal and vertical offset. The vertical being more of a potential issue on older lathes that may have worn tailstock bodies and are sagging.

                    I've done a fair number of chucking reamer holes in my own lathe. And I know it's in good alignment both vertically and horizontally. The final fit the pins or shafts was consistent from end to end indicating no taper to the reamed hole. Showing that a couple of thou is easily allowed for just as Mcgyver is suggesting.

                    I've also reamed holes done in my drill press. I drill the pilot and then ream it with the item held in the DP vise. If it's clamped down that's fine. But often as not I rely just on an anti spin bolt in one of the slots and hold the vise by hand. Same with reaming after the pilot hole. But for the reaming I only hold it to the table fairly lightly and let the reamer pull the vise into alignment as it enters the pilot hole. My reamers are all straight flute so no lifting is occurring so I don't need to hold it downwards firmly.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      The main difference between a hand reamer and a machine (chucking) reamer is the hand reamer has a much longer lead in taper. A hand reamer can give identical results when used in a machine as long as it can go deep enough in the workpiece to cut the full diameter. Machine reamers commonly have Morse tapers on them and do not fit well in tapstocks like the squares on the ends of hand reamers. The short taper on machine reamers make them much more difficult to line up when used by hand.
                      If you plump for a machine reamer in the tailstock, then extend the quill to give a tiny bit more flexibility.
                      Last edited by old mart; 11-10-2019, 02:46 PM.

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