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My week this week! My workshop videos.

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  • #16
    New stuff, firewood and a reluctant pump, its all in a weeks worth of work! Havent had much chance to film this week, so hope you like what I did get done!
    Phil
    East Yorkshire

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6LtmSTFOeQ

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKf...ltBjj7MWtdjWA?
    Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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    • #17
      Since time is on your side with the tractor tires I suggest you begin twice daily application of a few squirts of #1 fuel oil or kerosene or whatever you call it to all 4 beads to soften the rubber and make breaking the rubber loose from the rim as easy as is possible. Cookie sheets under the tires will contain any surplus applied.
      Second, find an old wood splitting wedge and dull the cutting edge to rounded over to about a 1/8" radius. The wedge and a 4-6 pound hammer should break the old tire loose. leave the tire in contact with the floor and attack the top quarter beginning on the inside. It WILL come off. If complete frustration comes to be, use a sawzall to cut the tire off next to the wheel, and lube the blade with brake fluid to prevent binding.

      Shower system is pretty much telling you what the problem is.
      New fixtures installed prior to buying house.
      Look for Teflon tape. If present, disassemble shower heads and remove accumulated teflon tape shreds.

      If you don't find shreds in the heads check flow with the head removed from pipeing. Also check for restrictors built into the shower heads.

      Begin praying on way to jobsite that the shower faucets aren't loaded with tape shreds.

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      • #18
        Hi Franz Good advice on the tractor tyres, I will be doing that next week, I have some kero/veg oil mix that should do the trick, and also some of the wifes thrown out baking trays, which I keep for washdown.
        On the showers front, I think we still have air locks, as we have a sink which also appears to be on the pumped circuit. I have tried with the shower heads off, and I know the head needed to operate the pump switches has been comprimised, but untill we can get consistent flow under gravity from the showers, the pump woll not start reliably. I have cleaned the pump input filters, and checked the flow to the pump, and it is good, but the client has fitted new showers in the ensuites, which are thermostatic, which means the hot flows first, and bleeds cold in as the stat warms up, and this is not recommended for pumped systems. there is a limited amount I can do to see if the system is still airlocked, and then we will have to look at removing the thermostatic showers, and replacing them with full flow shower valves., But I am going to start by removing the shower valves and checking for any obstructions or flow restrictors! thanks for your input!
        Phil
        Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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        • #19

          Hi all, this week the first of a two part slideshow on building my wood fired warm air workshop heater. My shop is 1150Sq ft, and is now warm even in the coldest days!


          Phil,

          East Yorkshire

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAViA-jroio

          https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKf...ltBjj7MWtdjWA?
          Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

          Comment


          • #20
            Part 2 of the heater build and a couple of videos at the end of a walk in the rain with my daughter, including gratuitous squirrel content, and lots of roaring water! watch, subscribe, like and enjoy!

            https://youtu.be/somnL0Lih58
            Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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            • #21
              Couple things,
              1, that heat exchanger is going to create creosote condensation in the smoke pipe, be aware of it and prepare to do frequent cleanouts of the smoke pipe.
              I may be a bit oversensitive to creosote in the smoke pipe so I added an extinguisher port to the smoke pipe itself for additional protection.

              2, you can improve distribution of hot air by adding turning vanes to better move air in the radiator system.

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              • #22
                Hi Franz, You are not oversensitive to creosote! it is a pain, but most of what I get is water, with a very small amount of creosote on top. I have had problems, but what I do now is light a quick hot fire with the flue fan on low, leave the air fan off till the whole thing gets hot which takes 20 to 30 minutes, then put the air circulating fan on low, and monitor the temperature gauge to keep the air temp inside the heat exchanger at 80F or above, and it all goes up the flue. I have opened the flue recently, and there is a thin layer of creosote in flue, but there is a drip outlet at the bottom which allows most of it to escape. If you turn up the airbox fan too high it does start to condense, but since I have burned the heater hotter and faster this is not a problem. I do need to insulate the flue inside though, and will try to get an insulated flue for outside before next winter, although you know how expensive they are , so I will be looking for "used". The flue fan is held in position by a spring clip and a pull out pin, so could be quickly removed and a CO2 extinguisher shot up the flue! I did put turning vanes in the air outlet from the boiler which spin the air in the same direction as the spiral of the duct, and then realised I had put them the wrong way round, ripped them out again and corrected my mistake. It does seem to make a difference, but untill I can eradicate the creosote as far as possible I leave the fan on low and the whole workshop is warmed in just under an hour. I also fitted the air outlett grills so that when the vanes are opened, they pick up the air as it swirls around the inside of the pipe, and the surprising thing is that although there does not appear to be much air noise in the pipe, there is sufficient air pressure to force the vanes into the fully open position, even with the fan on low speed!

                Going back to what you said re creosote, there are various ways I could have made the heat exchanger more efficient, for instance I could have put vanes on the inside the smoke chamber to pick up more of the heat, but I am glad I didn't as more heat removed = more condensation! The outlet flue is only warm at best, which is why I want to insulate it. It heats the workshop very well in all areas, without using much wood, and that is efficient enough!
                Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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                • #23
                  To begin I'm still working to understand the Brit fascination with divorced fireboxes. You've been on that system since 19th Century boilers and we don't do it here, never really have best I can tell. Perhaps it's due to the high quality and BTUvalue of what you call coal.
                  Add in the joy of 2 nations seperated by a comon language, and lesser britania's falling into the Metric camp and communication is getting more difficult. Hell, you guys even hang license plates on steam tractors and call trucks lorrie.

                  The above to the side for the time being, the portion of the smoke pipe inside the building is called breeching here. I built my wood stove to be so efficient it condenses creosote in the breeching rather than sending it up the stack. Quick eyeballing of a couple commercial boiler rooms and paths to the smokestack led me to "Light concrete", a mix of portland cement, some sand and a lot of vermiculite. I formed around the breeching pipe and filled the form with the mix the following Summer with fence fabric in the void between form and smoke tube to reinforce the light concrete since it has little strength. In hindsight I should have wrapped the breeching tube with half an inch of fiberglass prior to pouring the concrete to prevent adhesion of the concrete to the steel tube since they don't expand at the same rate. The insulation has minimized creosote condensation on the breeching by about 90%. Over time some expansion cracking is evident on the light concrete but it doesn't affect performance.

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                  • #24
                    Hi Franz, I didn't intend to have a divorced firebox, I saw the idea used by a youtuber called PPotty, and adopted it. it was really a fix for the rocket stove firebox, which smoked! The whole build has been spread over time, and started off as a proof of concept experiment to see if I could get enough heat out of it. The Mk1 design worked, but smoked, but now it works well, and I know a few tweaks will make it good! Breeching! never heard it called that, but you are right, I need to insulate my breeching! The lid of the firebox is insulated with vermiculite cement as you describe, and it would not be too difficult to make up some half round mouldings of it to use on the breeching. There is a proprietary product called Rocklap, which is rockwool insulation moulded to fit to various pipe diameters, and covered with aluminium foil, (ttps://www.insulationexpress.co.uk/rocklap-pipe-sections) but can't find anyone local with stock, and minimum orders plus delivery make it very expensive indeed! The rumours about our falling into the metric camp are greatly exaggerated, I still buy fruit and veg in pounds and ounces, and measure in thous, although I do use metric linear if it happens to come out round figures for whatever I am measuring. When Brittania was the engineering shop of the world, it was all made in feet and inches.
                    Phil
                    East Yorkshire
                    Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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                    • #25
                      Hi Guys, part 1 of my workshop rebuild slideshow, I will be putting more up in between videos, and I am back at the workshop from Monday, so expect a video next friday If I can get something interesting done. Monday I will be back out to fit new hoses to the showerpump, as the old ones were leaking, and then seeing if we can solve the other problems Thanks for watching, like, and subscribe of you want, but most of all Enjoy!
                      Phil
                      East Yorkshire.
                      https://youtu.be/j6-ErhZiYDw

                      Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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                      • #26
                        Not sure on your situation over there, but rock wool here has a growing corps of protestors who invade stores to protest this safe & sane product that has been around over 70 years I know of. Since it will withstand 2000°+ as well as being water resistant it would be ideal to cover breeching. My preference would be to stand the breeching off the wall and get insulation behind it too.
                        Add steel lath and you can easily plaster an envelope around the entire pipe.

                        Question seems to be where you'll get it.

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                        • #27
                          Franz, it is pretty unpleasant stuff to use, but in the UK it is supplied as a bonded product rather than loose rolls of wool, always use a dustmask when I use it, or glasswool for that matter. My breeching is clear of the wall, so I may just cast up some vermiculite. Back to work on Monday, Fittig new hoses to the showerpump, and then back to the workshop, renewed and refreshed, and determined to break eggs with big sticks!!
                          Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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                          • #28
                            Well, if you have sufficient eggs and quantity of stale beer you can make up a nice bonding agent for the vermiculite. Then again, portland cement works well too and might be easier to work with as well as provide better long term bonding.
                            I do recommend vibrating the pour to remove air bubbles. When I poured mine I ran a vibrator motor mounted to the bottom of the form.

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                            • #29
                              My beer doesnt last long enough to get stale!! I will put it on my "to do list" which these days is a lot smaller than it used to be.!
                              Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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                              • #30
                                Hi Guys, below is part 2 of my workshop rebuild, the interior of the "Chuch lane end", no video this week as I have been off with sinusitis, a thumping head and a stiff neck, but I am determined to go back next week, so it will probably snow!! like, subscribe and enjoy, any comments and questions welcome!

                                Phil

                                East Yorkshire


                                https://youtu.be/cGCxwq2BsLg
                                Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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