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Old microwave, scrap it or not?

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  • Old microwave, scrap it or not?


    Is there any thing of value inside of a Bosch microwave. Trust me I know about the capacitor in there, I got hit by one many years ago.

  • #2
    Is there a giant coil inside? Rewire it for an induction heater?

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    • #3
      There is usually a radioactive part in it, so dispose of the carcass appropriately. I pulled the cover off mine and found it was a nice long piece of fairly thick gauge metal. A couple hammer blows straightened it out enough to cut it up and use it for various projects. I pulled out the donut magnets though I have not found a use for them yet.

      Dan

      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #4
        Where do you find the magnets? They are always goo to have around.

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        • #5
          They are around the magnetron. Not all that powerful and usually brittle ceramic material.

          If it's older the transformer is "conventional", but usually welded across the laminations so rewinding can be painful. There is a movement to higher frequency switching power supplies.

          Just recycle it all.
          Last edited by lakeside53; 11-18-2019, 12:23 AM.

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          • #6
            Well, I was blown away this afternoon when I saw a new use for old microwaves
            My friend does Glass work for a hobby. He now uses an old Microwave to heat up a special container that is made from
            some refractory material that has a Silicon Carbide internal wall. The microwaves heat the internal wall to extraordinary temps....quickly like 3-5 min...
            here is a quote from a website called
            https://www.thebeginningartist.com/b...ve-glass-kiln/

            A microwave kiln works differently.
            Rather than applying heat from the outside, you apply microwaves. These microwaves travel through the kiln much faster than heat would.
            At the inside of the microwave glass kiln, there is a layer of so called ‘susceptor’ material which absorbs the microwaves and transfers it into heat.
            Depending the exact model, susceptor material and the maximum temperature can differ. But most of these glass fusing kilns for microwave use can reach temperatures up to 1800 degrees Fahrenheit or 1000 degrees celsius.


            There is a Video about the process , a bit down from the start of the the above URL
            In it , the lady covers the glass with the dome cover and for a very short time, you can see the black internal wall , which is the silicon Carbide material.
            that wall glows red hot during the operation ( as seen when removed from the microwave---there is a vent hole on top to view contents
            Rich
            Green Bay, WI

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            • #7
              any thought on using this for heat treating metal for tempering??
              Ed
              Agua Dulce, So.California
              1950 F1 street rod
              1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
              1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
              1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
              1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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              • #8
                There are any number of youtube videos for using the main power transformer to build a magnetic drill press, drill press clamp,spot welder, etc. Unfortunately, unlike the boat-anchor transformers of times past, the current crop looks feeble due to high-frequency switching power supplies. Although I have not tried using them somehow, I don't think these are up to the job.

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                • #9
                  It's a misnomer that there is a radioactive substance in a microwave.
                  They do give of a type of radiation but it is produced by radio waves not radioactive material.
                  Last edited by portlandRon; 11-18-2019, 06:06 PM.

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                  • #10
                    The donut magnets from microwaves get used all the time in my shop. I use them along with square tubing to make temporary fences on my drill press table, band saw, or whatever. So far, none has ever slipped. Those magnets are strong! They're great!
                    So many projects. So little time.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by portlandRon View Post
                      It's a misnomer that there is a radioactive substance in a microwave.
                      They do give of a type of radiation but it is produced radio waves not radioactive material.
                      My bad. Sorry. I was told by the guy at the junk yard that it was an extra $10 to dispose of because of the radioactive component. Turns out that it's simply toxic.

                      From the web: The magnetron inside a microwave can contain beryllium oxide in their ceramic insulators which can be fatal if it gets into the lungs. Simply removing it is safe, but never try to take one apart. It’s not worth it!
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                      Location: SF East Bay.

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                      • #12
                        The big transformer is useful for a number of projects. Spot welder, electro magnetic hold down, etc. Melt down the copper and stack up copper bars on a shelf....
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                        • #13
                          Ditto on the spot welder. That's what I made with mine. Also the timer panel can be made into a timer for any 120v machine or appliance (up to the watt maximum). My timer panel was stand-alone. That is to say; it had power in (cord) and power out through a relay. It was easy to put it in a box and add a controlled outlet.

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                          • #14
                            Its handy to have a transformer or two about.....that the two coils aren't on top of each other makes them good candidates for hacking....i.e. remove and replace the secondary to get what voltage you need. That and a few micro switches. With a transformer or two already in stock, I'd toss it....takes time to tear down
                            Last edited by Mcgyver; 11-19-2019, 09:01 AM.
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • #15
                              In addition to the spot welder, a resistance soldering unit can be made. Also a donut magnet can be pressed onto a dowel end to make
                              a magnetic pickup tool as I have done.
                              RichD
                              RichD, Canton, GA

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