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Dangerous workmen on You tube !

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  • Dangerous workmen on You tube !

    Since my hospital stay and while recovering I have spent a lot of time watching videos of machining on You Tube.
    Many of the videos show people doing things which I feel are, at the least, somewhat risky, some of them are downright scary. Today.s showed a fellow using a 5 c collet block to make T ee nuts and he left the mill running while he removed the block from the vice, turned it 180 degrees and replaced it, the end mill being about 1/4" away from the collet, and the collet block being no more than 1/2" away from the end mill. One slight mis move would have had flying/jamming tools and possibly fingers removed.
    I am no " safety pansy" and I sometimes do things which I feel are safe for me, but which I would never recommend for others, especially beginners, but even I would stop the spindle in this case.
    Is there any way, we, as a group, can encourage safe working practices, without unduly scaring or worrying others, especially beginners.
    Regards David Powell.

  • #2
    I've cut myself on stopped cutters more than spinning cutters. Safety is a spectrum.

    We have plenty of members with fingers hovering a thou over the keys, watching each thread for something to pounce on. On the odd occasion, I suspect it is helpful.

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    • #3
      Many threads on HSM have devolved into arguments about different perceptions of "safe". While there would be a limit where we'd all agree that one thing or another is simply foolishly unsafe I think you'll find that there's a WIDE range of "grey" between easily being safe and the point where 90% of us consider any given action to be unsafe.

      So while I agree with you in principle, and who doesn't want a safer shop, I think you'll find that everyone has their own version of "safe" in how they handle day in and day out practices.

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      • #4
        Matt, I cut myself on a new end mill early in my owning my first mill/drill. After that I kept a sturdy rag handy. And since getting more into leather working now I keep a couple of patches of sturdy thick suede in the same drawer as the end mills. It's not always needed, but at the first sign of tightness I just reach down and grab the patch of leather.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
          Matt, I cut myself on a new end mill early in my owning my first mill/drill. After that I kept a sturdy rag handy. And since getting more into leather working now I keep a couple of patches of sturdy thick suede in the same drawer as the end mills. It's not always needed, but at the first sign of tightness I just reach down and grab the patch of leather.
          That's a good idea. After I get a good cut I'll remember to start doing that.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post

            That's a good idea. After I get a good cut I'll remember to start doing that.
            I'd expect no less.... LOL This IS a safety thread after all....

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            • #7
              What get me is the utube titles claiming most risky/dangerous behavior only to find what some of us consider normal activities like felling a tree or pushing dirt with the bulldozer.

              lg
              no neat sig line

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                Matt, I cut myself on a new end mill early in my owning my first mill/drill. After that I kept a sturdy rag handy. And since getting more into leather working now I keep a couple of patches of sturdy thick suede in the same drawer as the end mills. It's not always needed, but at the first sign of tightness I just reach down and grab the patch of leather.
                Every time a leather belt gets too small - oops, wears out I mean - it goes to vice jaws, gripping, padding Mole grips...
                Decent thick leather, most belts. Shame they keep shrinking on me.

                Dave H. (the other one)

                Rules are for the obedience of fools, and the guidance of wise men.

                Holbrook Model C Number 13 lathe, Testa 2U universal mill, bikes and tools

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                  Matt, I cut myself on a new end mill early in my owning my first mill/drill. After that I kept a sturdy rag handy.
                  Now you've touched on my hot button subject. I don't allow shop towels or rags in my shop. Paper towels will tear away before you get pulled into anything rotating.

                  Just shows we all have somewhat different opinions of safety.

                  I'll protect myself the way I see fit and you can do the same.

                  You see me doing something stupid please say something. Maybe I'll change and maybe I'll ignore you.

                  If say something to you, feel free to ignore me if you want. If you later hurt yourself doing that I don't want to hear any complaints.

                  Mike

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                  • #10
                    I think a lot of people say that things are dangerous
                    to try and protect themselves from being sued.
                    A lot of people will try things because they saw you
                    do it, get hurt, then want to sue.

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                    • #11
                      Those that can, do

                      Those that can't, sue!
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

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                      • #12
                        You don't want to see me working at the drill press- even the machine cringes when I come near it. I have gotten better at using clamping aids though.

                        Lately it seems that driving the car is the most dangerous thing I could be doing. Every day that I go out I'm having to avoid an accident. People are getting bad for not stopping at stop signs, and for cutting you off. Today I had eye contact with a driver, I had the right of way, she simply cut me off instead of waiting two seconds for me to pass the intersection.

                        But back to the shop- I've had my share of cuts, and all of it my fault. Some of it is because I don't always debur sharp edges before continuing to handle the part. I'm getting better at that as well.

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                        • #13
                          When I see someone on a YouTube video doing something which is blatently unsafe I leave a comment. I state my concern and remind them that there are viewers who might not know better and would emulate their actions thus possibly injuring themselves. Not a safety Nazi but don't want to see some innocent chap or gal get hurt. By the way I have seen some of the more popular YouTube machinists do some unsafe/dumb things.

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                          • #14
                            Its youtube, the vast majority are inexperienced hobbyists so try not to take it too seriously. In the professional world we have fairly strict safety rules and policies for good reason, bc even in our world there are plenty of fools. Personally I don't worry over others much outside working hours beyond keeping away from the dangerous ones. More often than not I'm the odd one for having and using the proper PPE, and more often than not they hurt themselves.
                            "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                            • #15
                              realized its pretty dangerous to put your face close enough to the work..if it caught and QCTP gets broken off the compound the handle of the QCTP pushes your face right into the chuck.

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