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  • #31
    If you look around maybe a used Jewelers setup might work. Might be natural gas, methane, hydrogen, propane or acetylene. Another point is that victor does not make and will not sell a propane/oxygen welding tip. This is to prevent welding steel with propane or methane. Too much carbon makes the weld very brittle.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by lynnl View Post

      Damnit! It never fails. Someone asks for an apple pie recipe and everyone jumps in with reasons why banana pudding or brownies or this-or-that is so much better.
      He didn't ask what he needs; he asked one question: Anybody have any experience with the Mag-Torch brand?
      Then said he'd like to hear other recommendations EXCEPT acetylene that fit his stated conditions (implied) .

      Yes. He had already made up his mind about certain parameters and constraints - he said that at the outset.
      It's not him being argumentative, it's you and others.
      Yes I agree, he was very explicit in his request, however with a thread title like "Oxy Torch Suggestions" it is almost certain that others will click onto that thread and read it.
      It is only fair to those folks that all of the info be presented, pro and con to that choice.That information should be presented here for not only the OP but also to those that may read it later.
      Sometimes a little extra information from those that have been down that road before will help make a more insightful decision. We would be remiss in our obligation to offer aid by not presenting the information and experience we have to offer, for all concerned. It is a public forum, not a personal request line after all.

      No one here is trying to sell anything for personal gain, on the contrary, folks here have taken the personal time and effort to share what they have learned. That information should be graciously accepted and used as it fits the requirements of the OP.

      A simple "I decided to go with what I need, thanks for the all the info" would have been more appropriate than posting a complaint about receiving unsolicited advice.
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

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      • #33
        Originally posted by loose nut View Post

        That's right. They are HOME SHOPS not commercial shops where equipment costs get passed onto the customer, we have to pony up all the money ourselves. Many can not afford the commercial grade tooling you like so we have to bite the bullet and use what we can afford. If we are lucky we can get the occasional better bit of tooling.
        I have a HOME SHOP. I do not make parts for money. My shop is for me and my projects. There is no passing tools purchase price on to my customers. It is all me.
        As for tools, there is an economy of size where a tool begins to be effective, and any smaller, it is cumbersome to use.
        This holds true for a torch. Too small and you are applying heat for ever to get the item up to temperature, if it does at all.
        That is where the minimum effective size comes in. You need a torch big enough for the job, to get it hot quick, do your braze or weld or whatever.
        It is not an insulated oven. Heat loss is a race against time. Fiddle farting around with a toy torch is just that.
        That is what I was trying to convey. But you all know better. I don't argue, just state what works from my experience with torches.

        -D
        DZER

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Doozer View Post


          By your incredibly narrow list of acceptable parameters and your incredibly wide list of constraints
          it appears to me that you have already made up your mind what you want and want you need.
          That begs the question, why ask what you need here when you know what you want already?
          It seems you just want to argue.

          -D
          You're right, I had made up my mind on what I wanted and what I needed, that's why my original post stated, very clearly, that I was looking for a small oxy-propane torch, that acetylene was not in the running, and the torch I was looking at. Like Lynnl mentioned, it's getting told brownies are better when asking for an apple pie recipe.

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          • #35
            I have a oxy-mapp similar to the Menards model. I've used it a few times, and it is usable for small things. I had hoped that it would let me braze a 1 inch tube to a 2 inch tube, but I did not get a good joint. I have not used it for much since. I've since ended up with a TIG and use that for brazing as well as welding.
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by lynnl View Post

              Damnit! It never fails. Someone asks for an apple pie recipe and everyone jumps in with reasons why banana pudding or brownies or this-or-that is so much better.
              Well brownies are better.
              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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              • #37
                And oranges in a thread for celery...

                One point.... when you get into oxy torches, and particularly acetylene, in many places, if you have a fire, the FD comes, and if they find out there is oxy, and especially acetylene, but often any large fuel gas tanks in the structure, they back off, watch it burn, and protect other structures. Small stuff they expect, industrial tanks no.

                They do not want to be roasted or hit by big tanks flying out of the place. Just recall any of the many youtube videos of tank storage on fire, even just trailers full. Tanks come randomly flying out. How bad you want to go in and aggressively fight a fire that is going to "shoot at you" with heavy tanks rocketing around?

                Something to remember when you decide what to use, and where to store it. Outside in a fenced area where they can cool the tanks with a hose is likely best. Just like the welding shops often do.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #38
                  Professionals

                  They saw a sign that said Welding
                  They even professionally advised the owner that's why you buy fire insurance.

                  6 cylinders, 2 being acetylene popped safety plugs without moving.

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                  • #39
                    Now I know why all the manufacturing went to China.
                    The government and the media have you all scared to death
                    of anything that has to do with manufacturing and industry.
                    What a sad nation we have become where fear has been
                    indoctrinated into the minds of once proud men, who now
                    only fight to be the most obedient servants to overlords
                    who we voluntarily invite to listen to our every word and
                    to follow us where ever we go. Some of you preach utmost
                    safety above all else. There is a safe little padded room
                    waiting for you at Bellevue where we hope you will feel
                    very comfortable. And your government will pay for your
                    accommodations, while you try and heal from the affliction
                    that they gave you. Linger as long as you like, they have
                    you right where they want you. Enjoy your stay, Kool-aid
                    is served every day.

                    -D
                    DZER

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                    • #40
                      Doozer, you miss the fact that sometimes there is reason to be concerned. O/A has several rules that must be followed to use and store them safely. I was going to get an O/A rig for occasional use, and came to the conclusion that I can't count on myself to always remember and to always follow those rules if I only use it a few times per year. So I passed on the O/A in favor of simple propane / MAPP along with MIG and TIG.

                      Sometimes caution is not a bad idea.

                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                      • #41
                        Just because you are paranoid, it does not mean that they aren't out to get you.
                        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          And oranges in a thread for celery...

                          One point.... when you get into oxy torches, and particularly acetylene, in many places, if you have a fire, the FD comes, and if they find out there is oxy, and especially acetylene, but often any large fuel gas tanks in the structure, they back off, watch it burn, and protect other structures. Small stuff they expect, industrial tanks no.

                          They do not want to be roasted or hit by big tanks flying out of the place. Just recall any of the many youtube videos of tank storage on fire, even just trailers full. Tanks come randomly flying out. How bad you want to go in and aggressively fight a fire that is going to "shoot at you" with heavy tanks rocketing around?

                          Something to remember when you decide what to use, and where to store it. Outside in a fenced area where they can cool the tanks with a hose is likely best. Just like the welding shops often do.
                          There is more in my shop to be concerned with than just the oxy/acetylene rig. I would back off too.
                          Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                          • #43
                            I know I'm coming late to the conversation but I do want to share some of my experience. Years ago while I was working at a silver-brazing station, natural gas was all that was used. In fact the gas was also piped to a pilot light on a lever torch holder. The whole apparatus facilitated one hand operation of the torch between parts. Just lift, light and braze:Click image for larger version  Name:	Image-150-600x600.jpg Views:	0 Size:	19.1 KB ID:	1839884

                            Anyway, use of natural gas means using a bigger brazing tip compared to acetylene. I think we ran about 7 psi on the gas. 15 psi on Oxi, but I don't remember for sure. So I would say to the OP that acetylene is not required for brazing. But it would also depend on the size of items you need to braze. Hope this helps.

                            Best Regards,
                            Bob
                            Last edited by rjs44032; 11-22-2019, 02:52 PM.

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                            • #44
                              USE is fine, storage is likely best OUTSIDE the building, where the FD can see it and cool it, and gas cannot leak out and form an FAE bomb from the building. Two potential threats, particularly if you have a heater in the building.

                              Safe is not paranoid (but a bit of paranoia can help safety.).
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                AND it is arguable soldered copper compressed air lines in a fire are a greater danger to firemen than a 40cf Acetylene cylinder given that the Acetylene will leave the cylinder at a controlled rate after getting itself free of the encapsulation and core.

                                Anyone who thinks Propane is safer needs to factor in Propane is NOT in a concretious core inside the can and liquid will be coming out shortly after the gas has left.

                                Last I checked firemen ain't drafted or impressed into the job and there is a long line of men and women seeking the job. You hire on you should learn the job abd do it, not sit back watching and telling the owner that's why you buy insurance.

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