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  • Nomex Welding Gloves?

    15 years ago when I was a volunteer firefighter, we had Nomex gloves. I find the big, thick, heavy leather gloves very unfriendly and hard to use and so don't usually use anything for short welding sessions. Do they make a relatively inexpensive Nomex welding glove?
    Peter
    Grantham, New Hampshire

  • #2
    I seem to have a general feeling that a lot of TIG welders user a lighter glove than MIG or stick welders for dexterity. Maybe look into some of those. I would caution that the reason I like a big heavy glove for MIG welding is that I sometimes have to get in there tight with my off hand and it cooks the leather on the forefinger of my left glove. Those insulated leather gloves allow me to get the job down before I burn my hand. Usually its an important enough job I don't mind the expensive of another pair of gloves, but now when I think of it ahead of time I wrap some muffler insulation around my forefinger first.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #3
      I don't know about the Nomex gloves. I have Arc welding gauntlets that are bulky and clumsy but protect the whole forearm. But I also have MIG gloves that cover the wrist and are about as thick as the common split hide leather work gloves. They allow a bit more dexterity. When finesse is needed I use the TIG gloves which are as thin as doe-skin driving gloves.

      Black Stallion makes gloves with strategically placed Nomex. http://www.blackstallion.com/product...ucts_per_row=5
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #4
        What type of welding process? I have and use different gloves for Mig, Tig, and Stick. My stick gloves are heavy crusty leather ones because I've usually doing heavy crusty welding work. My mig gloves are much lighter and flexible, and my tig gloves are very thin barely noticable. Gloves are cheap, and IMO trying to get one style to fit all processes is a compromise for all. I've also got a tig finger I use that comes in handy sometimes.

        Edit I just did a quick google search and came up with these. I'm heading over to princess auto this weekend and will pick up a set to try out. For $5 it's worth a shot. https://www.princessauto.com/en/deta...es/A-p8789216e
        Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 11-22-2019, 12:47 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
          Usually its an important enough job I don't mind the expensive of another pair of gloves, but now when I think of it ahead of time I wrap some muffler insulation around my forefinger first.
          I have a 'tig finger' insulator sleeve that I use when I have to TIG close to my feed hand. Same idea as the muffler insulation but in a nice format.
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

          Location: SF East Bay.

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          • #6
            Run on down to the favored grocery store or home supply store and get a pair of OveGloves. The insulation value is superior to most welding gloves and they're washable, at least a few times.

            Tig Finger is a folded hunk of wire loom covering. Direct from China, 4 bucks. make your own for a buck and include aluminum foil or silver Mylar in the outer fold to maximize reflection of the IR and UV heat.

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            • #7
              For stick or mig you need the heavy leather gloves but for tig there are thin deer skin gloves. If you get a size that is a tight fit they give great manual dexterity BUT the heat also get transferred to the skin faster.
              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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              • #8
                Over the weekend I bought some MIG gloves at Harbor Freight. I was doing a demonstration on Saturday and 10 different people tried them and all seemed to like them. I thought that they worked well and I did a fairly long session welding and did not feel any heat coming through. For $20, they seem like a decent buy. It will be interesting to see how they hold up, but at least they are usable and I will use them rather than the nothing that I have been using most of the time.

                https://www.harborfreight.com/profes...s-l-63487.html

                Peter
                Grantham, New Hampshire

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                • #9
                  Firefighting Nomex gloves are great but very expensive.

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                  • #10
                    I buy the cheapest "regular" welding gloves I can find--usually 7-8 bucks a pair--but I only use the LH one for
                    mig welding. I've never found the need for a glove on my right hand. Maybe once in a blue moon I'll come up
                    against something that gets hot enough to require a RH glove but not very often. All those fancy exotic material
                    gloves are a waste of money

                    Tig gloves are a bit different; you need relatively good ones to protect your hands but, again, no need to go
                    overboard. When he's working on some serious alum. tig welding my brother can burn through a pair of tig gloves
                    in a few days. They are, after all, just consumables...
                    Keith
                    __________________________
                    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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                    • #11
                      While Nomex does not burn it is still damaged from high heat. So I think you'd find that the gloves "wear out" faster than the leather ones. Especially when exposed to a lot of weld spatter. And the other issue is that for Nomex to protect it needs to be used in multiple layers. So Nomex gloves may not be as thin and dexterous as you expect. Case in point is that racing drivers wear Nomex suits of multiple quilted layer suits and single layer Nomex socks but still wear thin leather gloves and shoes.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CPeter View Post
                        15 years ago when I was a volunteer firefighter, we had Nomex gloves. I find the big, thick, heavy leather gloves very unfriendly and hard to use and so don't usually use anything for short welding sessions. Do they make a relatively inexpensive Nomex welding glove?
                        Peter
                        Some of the best gloves I ever used were lined with nomex. Leather on the outside. After wearing the leather gloves for a week or two they break in. (I was welding 8 hrs a day at work)

                        EDIT: those were also some of the most expensive and longest lasting gloves on the market. Cost double what everyone else was charging. Amazingly comfortable after break-in, and lasted forever.

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                        • #13
                          I use cow hide work gloves for MIG/TIG. I have leather BBQ gloves as stick welding gloves as they came in different sizes and I found a set that fit well at a good price.

                          Here is something that might work. Sounds like what nickel-city-fab is talking about.

                          https://www.speedwaymotors.com/shop/...4-24-512-14639

                          TX
                          Mr fixit for the family
                          Chris

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                          • #14
                            Try these: https://www.weldersupply.com/P/2257/...ngGloves850REV

                            No affiliation with the seller, but that is the type and brand. Elkskin lines with nomex.
                            From the ad:
                            ""Revco Black Stallion FR Nomex® Lined Elkskin Premium Stick Welding Gloves #850REV
                            Specially constructed for those extra hot and splattering welding jobs that require quick and flexible dexterity, the fire-resistant Nomex® lined elkskin #850 premium stick welding gloves from Black Stallion help you get the toughest projects completed.

                            The classic tan color of premium lightweight elkskin leather looks great and allows is thick enough to protect against heat, flame and abrasion. The comfort doesn't stop there as the natural insulating Dupont Nomex lined back offers extra fire-resistant protection while being lightweight. As with most Black Stallion products, the Kevlar stitching doesn't just hold these tremendous gloves together, it also protects against parks and resists abrasion. You'll feel why these lightweight, heat resistant, and flexible gloves make your old, thick leather gloves obsolete.""

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                              Try these: https://www.weldersupply.com/P/2257/...ngGloves850REV

                              No affiliation with the seller, but that is the type and brand. Elkskin lines with nomex.
                              From the ad:
                              ""Revco Black Stallion FR Nomex® Lined Elkskin Premium Stick Welding Gloves #850REV
                              Specially constructed for those extra hot and splattering welding jobs that require quick and flexible dexterity, the fire-resistant Nomex® lined elkskin #850 premium stick welding gloves from Black Stallion help you get the toughest projects completed.

                              The classic tan color of premium lightweight elkskin leather looks great and allows is thick enough to protect against heat, flame and abrasion. The comfort doesn't stop there as the natural insulating Dupont Nomex lined back offers extra fire-resistant protection while being lightweight. As with most Black Stallion products, the Kevlar stitching doesn't just hold these tremendous gloves together, it also protects against parks and resists abrasion. You'll feel why these lightweight, heat resistant, and flexible gloves make your old, thick leather gloves obsolete.""
                              I've got a pair of those. I like them very much. But I don't think there is a "one size fits all" glove when it comes to welding. I've got traditional "oven mitts" (the typical leather welding glove you can get at hardware stores), which work great for things you know are going to be hell on the gloves. I've also got some very thin goat and deer skin TIG gloves that are great when I don't need a lot of heat protection but I do need good dexterity and good protection from UV radiation. I've also got the above pair of gloves as a general purpose stick or MIG welding glove. Then I have some of these for really high heat applications: https://store.cyberweld.com/tiweglalbaex.html

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