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Oil Filter Cover for DC Motor

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  • Oil Filter Cover for DC Motor

    I have project coming up that I will using a DC motor in Vertical position,the Treadmill Motors I have are all open on the top end.I will shorten filter in pic and mount similar to Total Enclosed Fan Cooled cover to keep foreign objects out.

  • #2
    Sheer genius.
    Simple and effective is best.

    -D
    DZER

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    • #3
      X2, sheer and simple genius, I like the fact that you get to reuse something you've already paid for.

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      • #4
        something to think about---those motors are designed and built to run in a horizontal position. You might want to consider a thrust bearing.
        Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Duffy View Post
          something to think about---those motors are designed and built to run in a horizontal position. You might want to consider a thrust bearing.
          Thanks Doozer&Nickel City Fab,I'm not concerned with running it vertical.It will still be belt driving so most will side load,have had numerous motors running Vertical on the farm over the years.Most recent a 10hp TEFC 1 ph that lasted 32 years in a very dusty environment and was wide open to all types of weather.
          Spoke to a fellow at Motor Rebuild&Refurbish shop he said they don't worry about vertical mount excluding very large motor 100HP and bigger

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post

            Thanks Doozer&Nickel City Fab,I'm not concerned with running it vertical.It will still be belt driving so most will side load,have had numerous motors running Vertical on the farm over the years.Most recent a 10hp TEFC 1 ph that lasted 32 years in a very dusty environment and was wide open to all types of weather.
            Spoke to a fellow at Motor Rebuild&Refurbish shop he said they don't worry about vertical mount excluding very large motor 100HP and bigger
            Whew, Thanks for that! I've spent several hours whittling out an aluminum adaptor/mount to graft a T/M motor onto the X2 mill head assy for my home-made CNC bridge mill project. I hadn't thought about the vertically mounted motor causing a bearing problem & got worried when I saw Duffy's post.

            Milton

            "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

            "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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            • #7
              The bearing problem likely is not a problem IF the motor has ball bearings, as pretty much all that I have seen do. Any sensible ball bearing can take the minor end loading of the armature weight.

              Plain bearings might be a different matter, they could need some form of thrust bearing.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

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              • #8
                In defence of my suggestion an explanation. Back in the 80s, I was working on problems associated with dangerous fumes leaking into the mechanical penthouse of a laboratory. My employer, (Govt of Canada,) had built a new, largish laboratory, and not only did the penthouse stink, it stank dangerously. We had to identify and fix the problem or personnel would have to wear breathing apparatus to service the equipment. While "poking about," I found a "motor graveyard" in a room- a pile of 40 or 50 motors. Upon asking, it was explained to me that these had ALL suffered rear bearing failure. Why it took that many motors to determine the issue, I did not dare ask! This was the first new lab built in about twenty years. It had about 150 fume hoods and the designer had elected to exhaust them using vertical propeller fans-at the time, something new. It seemed like a great idea-less floor space, less ducting, and easier to service. BOY! did they need service! Changing motors. These were GE motors made here in Canada, however, the fan belt had to be cut off and the fan disassembled to install a new one, (nobody thought of link belt!) Eventually, GE determined that, for this application, the motors required a rear thrust bearing. My contribution to this "Chinese Fire Drill" was to identify that the contractor used chemically porous flexible connector fabric, allowing fumes to escape, (canvas REALLY did not work- we substituted vinyl.) Ah fun and games in the past!
                Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Duffy View Post
                  In defence of my suggestion an explanation. Back in the 80s, I was working on problems associated with dangerous fumes leaking into the mechanical penthouse of a laboratory. My employer, (Govt of Canada,) had built a new, largish laboratory, and not only did the penthouse stink, it stank dangerously. We had to identify and fix the problem or personnel would have to wear breathing apparatus to service the equipment. While "poking about," I found a "motor graveyard" in a room- a pile of 40 or 50 motors. Upon asking, it was explained to me that these had ALL suffered rear bearing failure. Why it took that many motors to determine the issue, I did not dare ask! This was the first new lab built in about twenty years. It had about 150 fume hoods and the designer had elected to exhaust them using vertical propeller fans-at the time, something new. It seemed like a great idea-less floor space, less ducting, and easier to service. BOY! did they need service! Changing motors. These were GE motors made here in Canada, however, the fan belt had to be cut off and the fan disassembled to install a new one, (nobody thought of link belt!) Eventually, GE determined that, for this application, the motors required a rear thrust bearing. My contribution to this "Chinese Fire Drill" was to identify that the contractor used chemically porous flexible connector fabric, allowing fumes to escape, (canvas REALLY did not work- we substituted vinyl.) Ah fun and games in the past!
                  Did not mean to down play your suggestion and different applications seem to get varied results.I think conventional drill press motors have standard type ball bearing,but not sure.

                  One application that should not work at all is Grain Augers(some call them screw conveyer).Most of them use a standard type self aligning ball bearing with 95% of the load being end thrust and most last a long time.

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