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    I see some ares of the States are in for a bit of a freeze.Here in S Africa an area called vioolsdrif reached 129,9 degrees (54c) You wonder how hot it can get before a human cant survive anymore. Quite scary.

  • #2
    Come on over to my place in Ontario, Canada Plunger. It was -8 degrees when I got up this morning. We did have about 10 cm of snow earlier in November but a warm spell melted it. Looking at heavy snow in the next two weeks.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #3
      Plunger,
      what you write of reminds me of the place called "Death Valley" in the US, I have been there. It often reaches 50 C there, the animals live under ground and only come out at night. I live an hour away from Brian Rupnow, on the American side of the border with Canada, so -8 C with snow is very common for me also.

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      • #4
        I’m in central Alberta Canada and it’s -19C right now. Was something like -23C yesterday. We didn’t get hit with too much snow but south of us they got a foot or more.

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        • #5
          In the southern interior of British Columbia........ minus 12c here this morning.
          If it wasn't done the hard way, I didn't do it.

          Lillooet
          British Columbia
          Canada.

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          • #6
            I wonder whats worse hot or cold. You can put clothes on but can only take a certain amount off.In my area the historical low is about 8 c.But Im curious to know from a heat point of view. Lets say the stars all line up for the perfect storm and you have a sustained period of time that the temp is hovering in the fifties.Or if there is a bit of an oopsie and the temp spikes .When is it life threatening. You will not be able to sit in a shower at fifty degrees .It will kill you . At what temp would air temp actually kill you.
            This is the hottest recorded temperature in Africa recorded at a recognized meteorological station.Do we need to start getting nervous.?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by plunger View Post
              I wonder whats worse hot or cold. You can put clothes on but can only take a certain amount off.In my area the historical low is about 8 c.But Im curious to know from a heat point of view. Lets say the stars all line up for the perfect storm and you have a sustained period of time that the temp is hovering in the fifties.Or if there is a bit of an oopsie and the temp spikes .When is it life threatening. You will not be able to sit in a shower at fifty degrees .It will kill you . At what temp would air temp actually kill you.
              This is the hottest recorded temperature in Africa recorded at a recognized meteorological station.Do we need to start getting nervous.?
              HOT is definetely worse. 80 degrees below your body temp (-40Cel) is tolerable with enough clothing even for long periods but 80 degrees above body temp (120cel!) is impossible to survive for longer perioids.

              Humans can cope with quite high temperatures if the humidity is low and you have enough drinking water. Half an hour in 110 Cel sauna is nothing if the air is dry whereas 80 Cel @100% relative humidity is pretty bad.

              https://www.weather.gov/oun/safety-summer-heatindex

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              • #8
                One thing to remember is that clothing keeps the heat out just as well as it keeps it in. When I first started work, I was on a crew of migrant laborers in the southwestern desert. They wore wool, from head to toe, covered with leather. They ate hot peppers and salt and goats meat, and of course we carried plenty of water. On the very bad days, we would get a 3 hour break in the middle of the day, and find some shade for a nap.

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                • #9
                  I live in Maryland where the temperature in summer rarely exceeds 100F, but humidity is often over 70% where the least bit of exertion makes me sweat profusely and uncomfortably, so I have a hard time doing work or play outdoors. I don't recall it being so stifling 10 or 20 years ago when I was younger, although I remember times when I was a kid in the city and being unable to sleep with just a window fan. We didn't get A/C until I was a teen and had severe hay fever, and I got a window unit. My mother got a central A/C unit not long after my father died in 1983. By that time I had bought my $35 window A/C unit which I still have and use, although it is usually about 10F cooler here in a "holler" under many mature trees, but it is also very humid.

                  Some of my friends have moved to Florida, primarily (I think) to escape the cold and snow of winter. But our temperatures in January are typically 42F / 28F and it rarely drops below 20F, and sometimes we have delightful days where it reaches 60F or more. I enjoyed my time in FL when I left a 25F day with sleet, and arrived to be greeted with 65F. The locals were shivering in jackets and sweaters, while we took our shirts off and worked on a winter tan. I was also in FL in August, where it was 95F and high humidity, and that was brutal outdoors (we went to Disney World and Sea World).

                  I'm not really fond of cold weather, but it's not all that bad, and I enjoy doing things like cutting and splitting wood and gathering kindling for the wood stove. My 1500 watt electric baseboard heater keeps my bedroom (where I also have my computer, work table, and TV), warm enough when the wood stove cools off. My main concern is that the plumbing will freeze up in the kitchen when temperature drops below about 20-25F for very long. I have heat tape on some of the pipes but it needs to be redone, so I just let the water run at a fast drip overnight.

                  When it's really cold I like to read Jack London's "To Build a Fire".


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                  Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                  USA Maryland 21030

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                    One thing to remember is that clothing keeps the heat out just as well as it keeps it in. When I first started work, I was on a crew of migrant laborers in the southwestern desert. They wore wool, from head to toe, covered with leather. They ate hot peppers and salt and goats meat, and of course we carried plenty of water. On the very bad days, we would get a 3 hour break in the middle of the day, and find some shade for a nap.
                    Only difference is that humans produce heat energy instead of cooling. Good enough insulation and we can survive at -40c for weeks, but only few hours with "ideal" insulation in hot weather.

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                    • #11
                      I dont know how you guys can live in such cold weather.But it sure looks nice to cozy up to a fire. here where I live it gets to 82degrees in Feb but the humidity is 91%. I cant work in my garage under a tin roof . Its just too unbearable.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                        Only difference is that humans produce heat energy instead of cooling. Good enough insulation and we can survive at -40c for weeks, but only few hours with "ideal" insulation in hot weather.
                        True, but it will never get hotter than our own body temperature when we are properly insulated. That is quite tolerable. Far more tolerable than 130F in the desert, especially if you are taking salt tablets and water. You'll sweat like a pig but you won't die. I was doing 12-hour days like that.

                        Back up north here, the issue is not only cold, but also humidity and high wind. The dampness just sucks the heat out of you.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by plunger View Post
                          I dont know how you guys can live in such cold weather.But it sure looks nice to cozy up to a fire. here where I live it gets to 82degrees in Feb but the humidity is 91%. I cant work in my garage under a tin roof . Its just too unbearable.
                          Actually your February sounds exactly like my summer time, say, June, July, and August. The farmers are busy, everything grows almost by magic all by itself.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                            Back up north here, the issue is not only cold, but also humidity and high wind. The dampness just sucks the heat out of you.
                            It does "that St Louis thing" here..... rainy and about 34 degrees. I'd rather it was -20F, that is at least an "honest" sort of cold weather, the damp cold is horrible.

                            Those Canadian temps seem warm. Back in Minnesota it used to get down near -40C (-40F too) back in the 1950s-1960s. Should have been a few degrees colder further north.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #15
                              Nickel-city-fab---Did you see the big rattlesnake that lives in the old wooden well casing at Stovepipe Wells? Many, many years ago someone dug a well where the old stovepipe used to be, and cased it with boards. It has a hinged wooden lid. That big old snake that lives in there has surprised more than a few desert travelers.
                              Brian Rupnow

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