Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT Weather

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    It does "that St Louis thing" here..... rainy and about 34 degrees. I'd rather it was -20F, that is at least an "honest" sort of cold weather, the damp cold is horrible.

    Those Canadian temps seem warm. Back in Minnesota it used to get down near -40C (-40F too) back in the 1950s-1960s. Should have been a few degrees colder further north.
    Last Feb we had Nasty Cold temps here 24 days straight -44c at our house some morning and colder in low areas.There was a lot of morning we were coldest in North America that includes all the way to North Pole!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
      Nickel-city-fab---Did you see the big rattlesnake that lives in the old wooden well casing at Stovepipe Wells? Many, many years ago someone dug a well where the old stovepipe used to be, and cased it with boards. It has a hinged wooden lid. That big old snake that lives in there has surprised more than a few desert travelers.
      No, but I heard a few stories. I did see a few scorpions and lizards. They are edible, too. I'll never forget the snow we had in Buffalo, November 2014 tho. I'll be telling stories about that one till the day i die.

      Comment


      • #18
        200F sauna takes the chill off, regardless of the outside weather.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

          True, but it will never get hotter than our own body temperature when we are properly insulated. That is quite tolerable. Far more tolerable than 130F in the desert, especially if you are taking salt tablets and water. You'll sweat like a pig but you won't die. I was doing 12-hour days like that.

          Back up north here, the issue is not only cold, but also humidity and high wind. The dampness just sucks the heat out of you.
          Your body is a 500 watt heater even in light physical work (ie walking around) and without external cooling(extreme insulation) you are going to overheat pretty fast.
          100kg/200lbs persons body would heat up at a rate of 4 Cel per hour at that power level. You would be operational(but sweat like pig) for about half an hour and after 45 minutes experience severe heatstroke.

          Being able to work in 130F desert for entire workday is only possible thanks to evaporative cooling (sweating and breathing)

          Comment


          • #20
            Hovering around freezing here, maybe a bit on the minus side... Cold is not really the problem, the lack of daylight is worse. Of course the attempts to remedy that results in light pollution so I don't even get a nice starry sky to look at.

            Comment


            • #21
              I don't want to start another pissing contest again, i know Americans use Fahrenheit, but i just noticed Canadian posters using Celsius.
              Is this correct?
              And if so, must come from either the Metric (French) side of things or being part of the Commonwealth.
              Back on topic, Nov-early Feb is our cool season in the North here in Thailand, cool enough at night to put a jacket or sweatshirt on, dewy mild frosts in the mountains first thing, and a wonderful zero humidity mid 20's (C) daytime.
              Best time of the year.
              Motorcycle riding weather...

              Click image for larger version

Name:	335.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	2.07 MB
ID:	1841272

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                Hovering around freezing here, maybe a bit on the minus side... Cold is not really the problem, the lack of daylight is worse. Of course the attempts to remedy that results in light pollution so I don't even get a nice starry sky to look at.
                eXPLAIN THE LACK OF LIGHT THING. ?Are you close enough to the pole that you have very long nights and how long is a night. ?In summer are there problems with long days and how many months of long night and day do you have.?

                Comment


                • #23
                  Yes I'm about 400km south of the arctic circle. Dawn happened some time around 9:40 this morning and the sun will set again around 15:10. The payback for these dark months (around february it gets better again) are the light summer months, in june and july you can see the sun during the night, yes it dips below the horizon a short time because we are below the arctic circle but due to atmospheric refraction we still see it a little.

                  The long days are not problems, but the payoff for the long nights.

                  edit: See this for a complete info dump on sunrise and sunsets for the whole year near my location
                  https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/finland/vaasa
                  Last edited by DennisCA; 12-02-2019, 04:55 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post
                    ...I don't want to start another pissing contest again, i know Americans use Fahrenheit, but i just noticed Canadian posters using Celsius.
                    Is this correct?
                    And if so, must come from either the Metric (French) side of things or being part of the Commonwealth...
                    We Canadians, in our wisdom, have adopted a "bastardized" sort of metric system. We are "officially" metric and
                    have been for some time. Gasoline and diesel fuel are sold by the litre; speedometers are calibrated in in kilometres
                    and foodstuffs are generally sold by the kilogram. We have been this way for many years--fuel and road mileages (sic)
                    were metricized in the 70s.

                    Our construction and fabrication industries are a real hodgepodge. Just about any drawing that comes from an engineer
                    or architect will be drawn and dimensioned in metric but virtually all materials are still imperial--we still have 2 x 4s and
                    4' x 8' sheets of plywood and just about every piece of steel we buy is dimensioned in inches.

                    There are two problems:

                    One is that all the old farts like me still think and live in an imperial world. I'm not opposed to metric and I work with metric
                    dimensions a lot but, unfortunately, I still find it difficult to "think" in metric....somehow or other 025 mm is not the same as
                    .001". The old fart thing "will" sort itself out eventually because, thankfully, our youth are being taught in metric only, My
                    19 year old grandson who is taking engineering at UBC in Kelowna doesn't know what I'm talking about when I use imperial
                    measurements--this is a good thing.

                    The other, of course, is that our economy is so closely tied to that of the US that we must use imperial units in many cases
                    to appease them. Maybe someday the States will wake up to the fact that the metric system is a better way to go but until
                    that time we will have to "dumb it down" a bit to keep them happy...

                    Keith
                    __________________________
                    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      At least y'all drive on the right (correct?) side of the road!

                      For those countries that drive on the left (sinister?) side, I wonder if you also carry this convention to people walking on the sidewalk?

                      And I've also wondered about the standard sizes and spacing of construction materials and specs in fully metric countries. Do you have 5x10 lumber instead of 2x4s? Are concrete blocks 200x200x400 mm instead of 8"x8"x16"? And studs on 400mm centers?
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        People here talk about 50x100mm (sawn) or 95x45mm (planed) and also as two by fours or 2x6 or 2x8, because the old names live on even if the units haven't been used for nearly a century.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                          At least y'all drive on the right (correct?) side of the road!

                          For those countries that drive on the left (sinister?) side, I wonder if you also carry this convention to people walking on the sidewalk?

                          And I've also wondered about the standard sizes and spacing of construction materials and specs in fully metric countries. Do you have 5x10 lumber instead of 2x4s? Are concrete blocks 200x200x400 mm instead of 8"x8"x16"? And studs on 400mm centers?
                          Centimeters are not used much in construction or industry, only millimeters or meters. So 2x4 lumber would be 50x100. But it is still pretty commonly referred as 2x4. Weird enough the 2x4 in here is actually much closer to 2x4" than american 2x4" that is more like 1.5" x 3.5" in US. (we have also that size but its referred 38x89mm)

                          Studs or joists can be on various c-c dimensions, 300, 400, 500,600 and 800mm are some commonly seen ones. Concrete blocks and clay bricks come in gazillion different sizes depending on use.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by plunger View Post

                            eXPLAIN THE LACK OF LIGHT THING. ?Are you close enough to the pole that you have very long nights and how long is a night. ?In summer are there problems with long days and how many months of long night and day do you have.?
                            Half of the year the day is shorter than night and vice-versa. Up north it gets pretty extreme.

                            Sun set over a week a ago in Mehamn in Nothern Norway (71 N where I went to fishing in the summer.)
                            Next sunrise in Mehamn is 22. January 2020!
                            Bit over 2 months of polar night without sun rising above horizon.
                            Same goes in reverse during summer time, sun wont set for 2 months.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by LKeithR View Post

                              ...Maybe someday the States will wake up to the fact that the metric system is a better way to go but until
                              that time we will have to "dumb it down" a bit to keep them happy...
                              "Someday" was back in about 1870 or so...... that's when the US adopted the metric system.

                              The problem is that people just kept using the "customary" units, and did not change, and unlike some places, there was no government dictated requirement that after such and such a date there would be no more inches, by law, with penalties.

                              Most any food item is dual-labeled, and much of everything else is as well. But odds are that we will continue with most "customary" sizes of things, even if it may be labeled in metric units, just in order to fit what is there, much like Canada.

                              If we went "hard metric" by law, where round numbered metric sizes are required, and no metric equivalent of, say, an 8 1/2 x 11" piece of paper (216 x 279.5mm) was allowed, there would be chaos, just due to the huge installed base of existing "stuff" that would have to be discarded or updated to satisfy the law.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                                "Someday" was back in about 1870 or so...... that's when the US adopted the metric system.

                                The problem is that people just kept using the "customary" units, and did not change, and unlike some places, there was no government dictated requirement that after such and such a date there would be no more inches, by law, with penalties.

                                Most any food item is dual-labeled, and much of everything else is as well. But odds are that we will continue with most "customary" sizes of things, even if it may be labeled in metric units, just in order to fit what is there, much like Canada.

                                If we went "hard metric" by law, where round numbered metric sizes are required, and no metric equivalent of, say, an 8 1/2 x 11" piece of paper (216 x 279.5mm) was allowed, there would be chaos, just due to the huge installed base of existing "stuff" that would have to be discarded or updated to satisfy the law.
                                True. However I am sure the US will effectively be metric in a generation or two, much like Canada. Manufacturing is all metric now, and my nephews have never known any different.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X