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Thoughts on this Hardinge HLV-H

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

    -Why? What if you're not doing production work?

    Doc.
    I wouldn't of bought my 10EE for 3,000, nor my surface grinder for 1500. Has nothing to do with production work, and every reason why my 3D printer gets used constantly. It allows me to get more done with my time. Yes, I know, never leave a CNC machine by itself. Even so, CNC is a huge time saver, turns out a single complex part faster than I could do manually, much more accurately and quickly. I have a wife constantly wanting my attention, helping with the kids, helping keep up with the house.

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    • #17
      In my head and on my computer(Fusion360), every project I have lined up or dreamed up is geared towards CNC. I can do the CAD/CAM quickly, it isn't a hindrance to me, and quite frankly, my brain is wired for that kind of workflow. Manual is perfect for fixing things, simple things. Both have their place but CNC is king when it comes to producing actual parts I design in CAD.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        Although, that much money spent on a used lathe or any machine tool, I'd be looking for something CNC.
        Different machines. and if you did get a cnc for that, its not liklely its an up to date model, one of the best ones ever made and loaded with tooling.
        .

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        • #19
          Thing about these machines, is that IBM had a whole room full of them at one time, creating the worlds first CNC spindles among other things, back in the 60's. By the time an HLVH has degraded its accuracy to "normal" lathe levels, its probably 40 years old... and the normal lathe is brand new and you're still paying for it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by RB211 View Post
            In my head and on my computer(Fusion360), every project I have lined up or dreamed up is geared towards CNC. I can do the CAD/CAM quickly, it isn't a hindrance to me, and quite frankly, my brain is wired for that kind of workflow. Manual is perfect for fixing things, simple things. Both have their place but CNC is king when it comes to producing actual parts I design in CAD.

            You make it sound like you just download a cad file to a cnc machine and it just poops out a part.
            Is that how it works??

            -D
            DZER

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
              You make it sound like you just download a cad file to a cnc machine and it just poops out a part.
              Is that how it works??

              -D
              On the new controls all you have to do is turn your computer monitor towards the machine and it will just figure it out. True story

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              • #22
                In my past experience, the digital pictures always make it look nicer, better than real life. You need to go see in person and take some time, and cash. Around here nice lathes or machines like that will set for months on Craigslist. Sorry to say not that many hobby machinists like us around. Another pitfall good used machine sales….. the newbie has to have cash. A lot of these younger folks are used to credit cards and free shipping.
                Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                  I am confused. Oil bath bearings should last virtually forever, but sealed for "life" only lasts the life of the lubricant. The bearings in our--addmittedly cheaper--rockwell are on their way out. Only a 40-50 year old lathe.
                  Most sealed bearings can be regreased. If sealed with a "rubber" seal you can carefully pry it out usually from the inside or smaller dia. If it is a metal usually "shielded" bearing you can drill a small hole in the seal and inject grease, then clean the hole area and reseal with a small dab of silicone gasket maker. If a bearing starts to make noise and you get it soon enough it may be able to be saved with this relubeing. I have seen many bearings that I have relubed this way go for a long time, it works.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Doozer View Post


                    You make it sound like you just download a cad file to a cnc machine and it just poops out a part.
                    Is that how it works??

                    -D
                    For me, pretty much, in terms of generating the CAM, for most HSM types, apparently no?
                    It isn't hard?? Heck, very similar to 3D printing. Slicer generates Gcode, CAM is like a more visually interactive slicer with more control.
                    Last edited by RB211; 12-03-2019, 02:47 PM.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                      I am confused. Oil bath bearings should last virtually forever, but sealed for "life" only lasts the life of the lubricant. The bearings in our--addmittedly cheaper--rockwell are on their way out. Only a 40-50 year old lathe.
                      I think we're agreeing, oil bath seems to last forever, but being sealed, I said I'd do some due diligence on how long they should have lasted. Whats the life of the lubricant years or miles or both? The answer to that (maybe you know, I don't which is why I said DD) would might make the replacement of concern or not. I'm also not crazy about the average bear replacing precision bearings......you just never know.
                      Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-03-2019, 04:10 PM.
                      .

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                      • #26
                        Cost of spindle bearings in a Hardinge (down payment on a house) would make me think twice, but everything else would be fair game. I would be willing to bet they're OK tho.

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                        • #27
                          I thought about picking up a basketcase HLV at auction about 3 years ago. But my $300 ceiling was less than the $800 reserve. The other bidders felt the same and it went unsold, twice. When I inspected it after the auction, I found just so many problems. Broken halfnut, bearing slop, etc. Whew! One of those cases where it was a relief that I didn't get it, probably at any price. My 10ee is more than enough project, and it isn't the only one..

                          I recall there was a yahoo group for the HLV-*, and that is where most of the heavy discussion occurs - a vast resource. Looks like it moved over. If I was getting serious about HLV's, I probably ought to spend a lot of quality time reading.

                          https://groups.io/g/hardinge-lathe

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                          • #28
                            I find machining by moving the dials and levers, is a bit like hetero sex.. more fun to do it yourself than to watch someone do it in front of you.
                            but.. I suppose... if you are not good at it , the you may be better off watching it get done for you..

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by wdtom44 View Post

                              Most sealed bearings can be regreased. If sealed with a "rubber" seal you can carefully pry it out usually from the inside or smaller dia. If it is a metal usually "shielded" bearing you can drill a small hole in the seal and inject grease, then clean the hole area and reseal with a small dab of silicone gasket maker. If a bearing starts to make noise and you get it soon enough it may be able to be saved with this relubeing. I have seen many bearings that I have relubed this way go for a long time, it works.
                              I think we will try something like that this winter, but right now we can't have it down for that length of time.

                              Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

                              I think we're agreeing, oil bath seems to last forever, but being sealed, I said I'd do some due diligence on how long they should have lasted. Whats the life of the lubricant years or miles or both? The answer to that (maybe you know, I don't which is why I said DD) would might make the replacement of concern or not. I'm also not crazy about the average bear replacing precision bearings......you just never know.
                              I inspected a 1943 oilbath lathe last Wednesday that dad and I intend to get (I'm going light on the details until it's on the trailer. I'll make a thread once it's home), and the headstock was nice and quiet and free on that one. I highly suspect the bearings to be original, and with with the backlash adjustment on the tapered rollers, you can run them pretty far worn. I doubt the oil has been kept clean or the right type used (no detergent). So yeah, I got to admit I'm a bigger fan of oil bath bearings. That's part of why I've never been interested in 10EE, HLV-Hs, and other precision lathes. I want a gear head. My line of work doesn't really care if there is tiny amounts of tooth chatter. I respect what Robin Renzetti can do with little one, but I much prefer Adam Booth's line of work.

                              Sorry for the tangent.

                              Uh to answer your question, I'm guessing it's more age dependent, but I'm sure it's possible to wear them out with use too. I think you'd have major bed wear at that point though. Contamination is of course the real killer.
                              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                                I am confused. Oil bath bearings should last virtually forever, but sealed for "life" only lasts the life of the lubricant. The bearings in our--addmittedly cheaper--rockwell are on their way out. Only a 40-50 year old lathe.
                                HLV bearings are neither oil bath nor sealed for life. They are un-shielded angular contact bearings, and they can be cleaned and re-greased (if you're brave enough). I am sure that the HLV-H are similar construction (if slightly different size and arrangement).
                                Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                                Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                                Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                                Monarch 10EE 1942

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