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RECIPROCATING "CHAIN SAW" Help

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  • #16
    I think he is talking bigger trees like 20 to 30 inch diameter.
    I did some research last time I had to remove a tree, cherry about 10 inch at the butt..
    first leave the tree high like 4 to 10 feet.. no low stump.
    use water pressure, like a hose to was dirt away from roots, if on a hill, ditch it to let water run away. As roots get washed clean, cut them. Once you are about 1/2 way around , you can pull on the stump, higher up, even better..longer lever. Once the tree starts moving it starts lifting the roots.. even better.
    thinkI got the tree out in under an hour, was surprised.

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    • #17
      When the Erie Canal was dug by men and horses, many trees were cut and many stumps were pulled. Trees became lumber and stumps became potash to make soap. Stump puller was nothing but a god sized T made of timber with a large hauser that secured to the stump and traveled over the long branch of the T to oxen who provided power. Later designs used oxen to power a winch around an axle with a long lever.
      The whole trick to pulling stumps without destroying equipment and people is leverage and point of attachment to the tree. Hitch low and you pull hard. Hitch hgh and the tree helps you.

      My preference remains with burning stumps out.

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      • #18
        Seems to me that a common electric chain saw would work as well. Mine has a 14" blade and a 2.4 kW motor - same size as a builder's circular saw. It has the HUGE advantage that when I release the trigger the chain stops instantly. Let the trigger go and dump it on the ground immediately. It gets used around the farm far more than any of my petrol chainsaws. And it makes nice clean straight cuts (subject to good chain sharpening).
        Cheers
        Roger

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Franz© View Post
          When the Erie Canal was dug by men and horses..............
          Stump puller was nothing but a god sized T made of timber with a large hauser that secured to the stump and traveled over the long branch of the T to oxen who provided power. ......
          I'm trying to visualize the arrangement of this T. Is it placed on the ground, upside down, i.e. with the crossbar on the ground, perpendicular to the direction of the pull? I'd guess you'd want to initially tilt it toward the stump so as to provide more lift as it's pulled upright. (??)
          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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          • #20
            Wow what a blast into the past, think it's safe to say that the Wright saw is the Wrong saw for just about any job lol

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JFLingg View Post
              It will not clear sawdust from the cut, you must work the saw back and forth.
              JFLingg
              I think this is a great observation and seems to be the reason as to why the thing stalled out in Willy's vid.

              It chokes on it's own cuttings...

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              • #22
                As an avid watcher of Ave I always got a kick out of the tiny chainsaw he uses to open boxes.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2dJLDxoTIY
                Andy

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                • #23
                  This is very interesting looking at this crankshaft it appears as if the saw had about a 3 inch stroke. Assuming that the small crank throw is the throw that power the blade. Does anyone know what the specs are ? Edwin Dirnbeck
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 12-04-2019, 12:59 PM.

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                  • #24
                    We had a pneumatic saw at work for cutting up big blocks of Styrofoam ( 4'x2'x8') It had twin reciprocating blades like an electric carving knife.The teeth were about an inch long and were triangles sharpened on both edges. It sounded like a machine gun when it ran!

                    Dennis

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                    • #25
                      I want a USB powered chain saw!

                      https://www.wired.com/2009/07/usb-po...s-credibility/



                      I already have a "pocket chainsaw":

                      https://www.instructables.com/id/Pocket-Chainsaw/

                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

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                      • #26
                        And I thought I went bad when I bought my 18 volt battery driven ChinkWaukee chain saw.

                        Actually the ChinkWaukee outcuts my Echo the same size cause it starts by just pulling the trigger rather than spending hours pulling the rope on the echo and more hours with horse liniment on my shoulder.

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                        • #27
                          I never knew there was such a thing. Chainsaws--Sure, been around forever, but I never heard of a gas powered reciprocating saw.---Brian
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • #28
                            The full name was Wright Saw, Rebel. I remember seeing them demoed at a
                            tool rental place that the old man frequented back in the olden days. Never
                            saw [sic] one in use by any actual owners. Not a big seller.

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