Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Small Parts Appreciation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Small Parts Appreciation

    I acquired a couple of singer sewing machines at a garage clean out. I spent several hours taking them apart to see what makes them tick. To my great surprise, I found all kinds of small parts (set screws, shoulder screws, clips, springs and on and on). I really was amazed at the engineering in these machines. When all said and done I will have several more coffee cans of stuff to add to my collection of "someday I might need that" pile. [will I really use it?] If you have a couple of hours to kill get one of these to add to your coffee can parts department. You will at least appreciate the engineering.

  • #2
    This is on my "to-do" list someday... I have heard that Singer, and many other makes used very unique screw threads on their older machines, proprietary pitch/diameter combinations. I once ran across a singer support website for dealers, that had specific taps for their machines.

    Comment


    • #3
      There was a real reason for standardizing screw threads. I have never liked anyone who used non standard screw sizes for no reason other than to ensure their sales of repair parts. And that includes that great US company, Starrett.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      Make it fit.
      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

      Comment


      • #4
        Ponder for just a minute on the reality that mass production could not have existed without Singer's standardized mass produced components. Henry Ford couldn't have built the Model T without Singer's standard parts.
        Most industry, even farm wagons exist because Singer created standard parts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Starrett wasn't half as bad a B & S. Look thru the Machinerys Handbook and you will find all sorts of special B & S tapers and thread sizes. One job I got when still an apprentice was to fab some lock screws for the sleeve of B & S inside mikes. The shop had a set of B & S mikes that some of the screws were missing. Had to turn and single point the thread. Got to checking the thread size, and it was 50 TPI. We had a very nice Monarch 10EE to use. Unfortunately, the 10EE would cut a 48 TPI and 52 TPI. Since the length of engagement was short, probably about 1/16th", we went with the 48 TPI and went a little under size.

          Sarge41

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Franz© View Post
            Ponder for just a minute on the reality that mass production could not have existed without Singer's standardized mass produced components. Henry Ford couldn't have built the Model T without Singer's standard parts.
            Most industry, even farm wagons exist because Singer created standard parts.
            Standardized mass produced components existed long before Singer came onto the scene.
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              Singer made most of their parts in house, including the fasteners. https://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk/screw_threads/

              Comment


              • #8
                Unless you have an awesome way of cataloging those parts you may spend as much time rummaging around in your bins as making the part from scratch.

                In that vein. Many years ago before I had my own contracting company I used to work with a fellow (Al Amick deceased) who had pouches and cans of assorted screws and "stuff" in his service truck. I watched him rummage around for an hour (literally) a few times, but he quite often found just the right part to finish a job. On one such job site he started his typical forage, and I wandered off out of boredom (or with purpose). I came back just in time to see him triumphantly show that he had found the right fastener. I said, "Well that's nice but the job is finished. I went to the store and bought one while you were looking." He was an interesting character. He had some good things to teach too. Never go up a ladder with just one connector or one screw to finish something. It will cost you hours looking for it in the grass when you inevitably drop it. I used to come home with spare screws and connectors in my shirt pocket nearly every day. LOL. I taught my guys the same thing. It cost me less money for them to take home a few connectors than it did for them to climb down off the ladder and look for the one they dropped. I think that's how Al wound up with all those pouches and containers full of useful detritus. He never threw away a screw or a connector. He just dropped it in his pocket.
                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think I heard once that Singer and Royal typewriter made gun (govt 45) and ordnance parts for the government during world war 2. Can any one confirm that?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I can confirm that GM Hydramatic Division made rifles for Vietnam. Does that help?
                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bob, I learned a long time ago to always carry spares whenever I was off the ground. Being a Lineman and working anywheres from a handful of feet up to 120 feet above ground level made that a "must do" practice.
                      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1911 a 1s were made by singer, remmington? (the typewriter one not the firearm remmington) , union switch and signal, And all parts from all brands would interchange,

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think I heard once that Singer and Royal typewriter made gun (govt 45) and ordnance parts for the government during world war 2. Can any one confirm that?
                          During WW 2 lots (most actually) of manufacturers were diverted to making armaments or other war goods rather than their normal output. I saw a program a few years back about Lionel (toy trains) who were initially diverted entirely away from their toy production, until FDR intervened so toy trains would be available at Christmas. He felt national morale was important enough to justify that decision.

                          I took army ROTC in college, and the M1 rifle I marched with was made by one of the typewriter companies ...forgotten which.
                          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If I recall, there were M1 carbines made during WW2 by Rock-Ola, a manufacturer of jukeboxes, that are somewhat sought after by collectors today.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Arcane View Post

                              Standardized mass produced components existed long before Singer came onto the scene.
                              Your assertion differs from my readings and understanding. On what do you base it?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X