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Resin printer maiden voyage

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    If I can get my buddy at work to 3D print me a new dashboard for my tractor with one of our printers
    and it actually turns out well, I will stop trashing on them. We have like 6 of them and
    they are constant problems.

    -Doozer
    What tractor? Got a pic of the dashboard?

    They can be fiddly and problematic, but it depends how much you expect of them and how much you tweak and screw with it. My expectations are low, and I don't tweak with them at all lol. They fill a unique niche of machine shop support equipment for me, nothing more nothing less.

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    • #32
      Here's last night experiment. Wife has an electric spinning wheel (Hansen), and has asked me to make more bobbins for her (for a while now....) The regular bobbins are easy (still haven't made them though....lol), but the one for a wooly winder has a level wind mechanism, (she uses it for plying) and a gear is required. I make NO claims that is is an "accurate" gear, the extent of my gear knowledge could fit in a thimble. BUT, this gear shaped object (GSO) "works" (by works I mean meshes with the other gear, in a way that "looks" like a gear ). I printed this more as a fitment test, but it left me with 2 "useable" GSO that I will turn into extra bobbins for her. Not sure how far down this rabbit hole I will go, but I'm impressed thus far. I used the Geargen plugin for rhino, and judging from the measurements I took (and using an online calculator) from the existing gear is was a 24t 32DP 20*PA. Like I said above, this is my first foray into gears and I haven't a clue what I'm doing. It's a vast subject that's for sure....

      I also don't know if the life of these will be measured in hours, minutes or years (hopefully not seconds). I also wonder if these will cause unnecessary wear on the mating gear but for the application I think they will be fine. I'm kinda curious now about other applications and might play around a bit. If I get some time tonight I might draw some gears the way we learned in college and compare the geometry to the plugin, as that's probably the best place to start chasing accuracy, and practicability . Garbage in/garbage out. Life span and accuracy compared to proper generated gears is most likely not even a comparison (not looking to start that debate again, I get it....), but for low use shop stuff it might be a viable option for some "practical" gears. Especially for prototyping designs.

      For a "time invested" comparison, I have about 30-40 minutes of hand on time (including desing and cleanup) invested in these 2 GSO. They took around 3hr to print overnight.

      They're really tough to photograph with my camera phone, parallax error makes them look worse in the pics than they do in real life. They actually DO "look" pretty damn close to the original judging by my "eyecrometer". How close that is to a "spec" I have no idea. I'd really be curious to find out though.







      Now I need to turn some wooden end caps. I made the step there a press fit for 1/2" copper pipe.

      Bill, here is the support system I use for circular objects. This is probably revision 10, as I change and tweak it everytime I make it, but it really helps getting stuff up off the build plate, relieving suction, and they come off easy. the contact face tapers down to about 0.01" (I simply 2d scale it to fit the part I'm printing) I've got a knob printing right now with a different more skeletal style, and will post up when it comes off. I was in too much of a hurry to clean these up I never thought to take pictures of the actual parts. I do something similar with other shaped parts too. In short, I HATE the pock marks the stock support systems leave all over and try to model as much of the supports as I can. Or eliminate them completely through part design. The pock marks might disappear under a coat of paint on a figurine, but on a finished part they're unsightly.




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      • #33
        Mr Z's livelihood is machining gears, so I understand how he must feel about this subject. Much like everyone with a SLR camera thinks they are a professional photographer. Truth be told, close enough is good enough, these printed gears work great. We aren't putting printed gears in automotive transmissions or accessorie gearboxes on jet engines.
        Your gear looks great. Neat support. Will try it when I get back home

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        • #34
          Originally posted by RB211 View Post
          Mr Z's livelihood is machining gears, so I understand how he must feel about this subject. Much like everyone with a SLR camera thinks they are a professional photographer. Truth be told, close enough is good enough, these printed gears work great. We aren't putting printed gears in automotive transmissions or accessorie gearboxes on jet engines.
          Your gear looks great. Neat support. Will try it when I get back home
          Yeah, I wasn't trying to start that debate again lol. That's specifically why I said "gear shaped object" . Zahnrad is a gear professional, I respect his experience, and input. For my own curiosity I'd like to see how far off the tooth profile of these is off though (both to what was drawn via plugin, and what it "should be" to spec), and how that relates to service life, and general use etc. Everything I've measured off this thing has been within a thou or 2 (or better) in the XY (outside linear measurements with a mic/calipers), Inside measurements have always been a few though tight though, but I suspect it's just due to not getting them clean enough. The ultrasonic has helped tremendously, I'm now looking at getting a better one also to use for carb cleaning (the reason I got this HF one in the first place). I should print a test block with a bunch of features and 3d form to check on the CMM at work.

          I do agree with you though that in many hobby cases good enough, is good enough. A printed gear will probably never (in my lifetime anyway) live in an automobile transmission, but it might be serviceable in a spinning wheel bobbin..... Or an RC car/boat/tank/train/lego etc. There is an application for everything.

          I printed a 20mm cube along side those GSO last night directly on the bed, and It was 20.00 in both x and y, and 19.61 in z (mitutoyo calipers), with a bit of a foot on it that measured 20.11 across both sides. The cube I printed at an angle on point measured 20.02 - 20.05 with a bit of out of square skew (didn't measure how much) and distortion on the edges. I suspect my Z axis isn't perfectly perpendicular to lcd. If one were to build a proper rigid, adjustable Z axis with a good slide and screw (instead of parts bin chinesium garbage), and a more rigid build plate you'd have a pretty capable "machine". The resolution in the cheap screens is pretty good for most applications. Resin properties are evolving too. I still haven't tried my flexible stuff. Only ever printed in elegoo black.

          I get that I might come across as a printing fanboy to some here when I share this stuff, but IMO I've always been the opposite. I've just tried to worked with them in ways that play up their strengths, while understanding the weaknesses, and approaching everything with skepticism. I've been one of the biggest critics of printing since I first got started, but have found a place for both resin and FDM in my shop and projects. I didn't get my resin printer for stuff like this, I got it specifically to generate high resolution 3d patterns efficiently (requiring very little human processing and tending to). It does that VERY well, I've just been surprised at what else it does well too.

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          • #35
            Like I said above, this is my first foray into gears and I haven't a clue what I'm doing. It's a vast subject that's for sure....
            Since I will never be more that a half vast machinist these 3D printed gears will be better than any I machine. I love being able to 3D print a gear with any number of teeth I want with no dividing head involved.

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